Definition of entryism in English:

entryism

(also entrism)

noun

mass noun
  • The infiltration of a political party by members of another group, with the intention of subverting its policies or objectives.

    ‘cases of alleged entryism have been reported in many constituencies’
    • ‘This promised a fate worse than death: if not entryism by extremist groups, then a withdrawal into a run-down citadel from which insults, but nothing more attractive, would be hurled at the outside world.’
    • ‘OK, OK, this sounds like entryism, and we know how discredited that philosophy is, right?’
    • ‘He said he hoped all these applicants would be vetted to prevent entryism by Stalinist, Vanguardist, Revisionist, Workerist or Adventurist elements.’
    • ‘In the party's brief life it has only suffered from ‘exitism’, not entrism.’
    • ‘The leadership at least realised that the organisation was being subjected to a concerted campaign of Trotskyite entrism.’
    • ‘Does the hard left still plan and theorise about how best to foment revolution in the UK, do they engage in entryism and agitation, and so forth?’
    • ‘Deeper, it's the usual thing of the main-streamers versus the Socialist Workers, who may or may not be up to their traditional practice of entryism depending on who you talk to.’
    • ‘But such entrism is of little value if the final product is rejected by the electorate as too extreme and too zealously focused on single issues.’
    • ‘I mean, I can see the logic of such entryism, but I think in the end it damages Britain's chance of becoming a truly tolerant and pluralistic society.’
    • ‘However, the entryism practised by the British Trotskyists was guided by a completely different perspective.’
    • ‘The group was following the policy of entryism, closing their eyes to all the main crimes of the leadership for the last 22 years.’
    • ‘I hope that this is an overreaction to the years of entryism..’
    • ‘For Marxist organisations, entryism is understood as work carried out within another organisation without, in the process, abandoning their own program or organisational structure.’
    • ‘Some fear falling membership has left political parties vulnerable to entryism.’
    • ‘As we awake from the dreary dream of entryism, we can start to see that what kept us slumbering in the last twenty five years was indeed a programme of controlled, if not quite repressive, desublimation.’
    • ‘Should we form a faction within an existing Parliamentary party and push for medium term control (ie entrism)?’
    • ‘‘This is a classic case of entryism, just like the Militant Tendency,’ says one worried Labour activist.’
    • ‘This was the culmination of a process of left-wing entryism which has seen unions representing communication workers, railwaymen, the fire brigades and the civil service fall like dominoes.’
    • ‘Disputes arose over state capitalism, the nature of the revolution in the developing world 7, the Eastern European states, whether entryism should be adopted and the precise structure of revolutionary parties.’
    • ‘The extreme left can't get a foothold in UK politics as independents, so it looks like a return to entryism for them.’

Pronunciation

entryism

/ˈɛntrɪɪz(ə)m/