Main definitions of entrance in English

: entrance1entrance2

entrance1

noun

  • 1An opening, such as a door, passage, or gate, that allows access to a place.

    ‘the southern entrance of the palace’
    ‘the entrance to a tunnel’
    as modifier ‘an entrance hall’
    • ‘There is a gate lodge at the entrance to the estate, a number of cottages and a stable block, which may have potential for conversion to residential use.’
    • ‘This office is approached through the entrance to Settle town hall.’
    • ‘After fixing the gates across the entrance to the farmyard to keep the sheep in one place we marched up the hill to drive them down.’
    • ‘The Santa Monica courthouse has five entrances and most news channel had one camera crew at each entrance to try to get a picture.’
    • ‘The Golden Gate, a 4,200 ft suspension bridge, spans the Golden Gate Strait at the entrance to San Francisco Bay.’
    • ‘I've just passed under the grand arch at the entrance to Lions Gate Studios.’
    • ‘Tonsils and adenoids are located strategically near the entrance to the breathing passages where they can catch incoming infections.’
    • ‘Plainclothes members of the public security bureau were watching the great red gate at the entrance to the crematorium yesterday.’
    • ‘He paused before passing through the first gate and into the short passageway between the entrance to the fortress and the inner portcullis.’
    • ‘Two sets of wrought-iron gates herald the entrance to a driveway that sweeps in a horseshoe round the front of the building.’
    • ‘Finally, we reach the entrance to the gate, where two big doors swing open to let us in.’
    • ‘The entrance to the monastery is on the eastern side of the first level and at the far end of the entrance hall, behind a stonewall, part of which still exists, was the crypt.’
    • ‘The caretaker of the school will tend the site, closing an access gate and opening another entrance to the public at 4pm each day.’
    • ‘Improvement work will now allow an impressive entrance to the Saint Patrick Centre from Market Street.’
    entry, way in, means of access, means of entry, ingress, access, approach
    View synonyms
  • 2usually in singular An act or instance of entering somewhere.

    ‘at their abrupt entrance he rose to his feet’
    ‘their entrance into the political arena’
    • ‘Steps have already been taken to try and reduce the number of vehicles driving on the surface, with the placement of new bollards restricting the entrance of heavy vans entering the town.’
    • ‘However, the next day, he saw an opportunity to gain possible entrance into the warm building.’
    • ‘Startled by the abrupt entrance of his daughter, he got up quickly.’
    appearance, arrival, entry, ingress, coming, coming in, going in, materialization, approach, introduction
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    1. 2.1usually in singular The coming of an actor or performer on to a stage.
      ‘her final entrance is as a triumphant princess’
      • ‘A signature tune was also used to herald the entrance of an individual performer in variety shows, a practice that continues on some television chat-shows.’
      • ‘A conceited thespian, he treats every introduction as a stage entrance and every conversation is a source of high drama and shameless posturing.’
      • ‘The entrance on to the stage was greeted with a mixture of squealing, screams, shouts and rounds of applause!’
      • ‘The first idea we glean from him is his description in the stage direction that introduces his first entrance into the stage.’
      • ‘It was an entrance modelled on the performance of Gary Cooper in High Noon and here, just down the road from Hollywood, it was made by the biggest star in town.’
    2. 2.2mass noun The right, means, or opportunity to enter somewhere or be a member of an institution, society, or other body.
      ‘about fifty people attempted to gain entrance’
      as modifier ‘an entrance examination’
      • ‘The only way it will commend itself to students and become established is as a prerequisite of university entrance, demanded by students and vice - chancellors alike.’
      • ‘The cost of the outing included entrance fee, a guided tour of the garden and a light lunch of organic food.’
      • ‘The senate was usually limited to 600 members, and entrance was dependent on property qualifications and election to key offices.’
      • ‘He had a perfect A average as an undergraduate but his father, a milkman, had no political connections so he was denied entrance.’
      • ‘As they patiently waited in line, they continually saw people show up and gain entrance right away without having to wait.’
      • ‘There's even talk of instituting entrance exams to decrease the number of students entering community colleges.’
      • ‘The upcoming yearly college entrance examination creates a huge demand for such pencils.’
      • ‘By the time they have cleared the school examinations, professional entrance tests are upon them, catching them unawares.’
      • ‘Following graduation from high school, he set out for Tokyo to prepare for university entrance examinations.’
      • ‘She was well on course to gain the grades in chemistry, geology, biology and history she needed to gain university entrance.’
      • ‘If the reliability of the Bagrut exams is undermined, the universities will introduce entrance examinations, he warned.’
      • ‘It is widely regarded as an elite institution and only one out of every 100 candidates for the tough entrance examinations gain admission.’
      • ‘Places are determined by the results of the nationwide university entrance examination.’
      • ‘If they had this rule, ladies would have the right to demand entrance.’
      • ‘The winner is able to go straight to university without attending entrance examinations.’
      • ‘In the spring of 1924 Leopold passed the entrance exam to enter the law school at Harvard University in the fall.’
      • ‘Police are certain the three are connected because in each case entrance was gained via windows at the rear of the properties which were all in close proximity to each other.’
      • ‘This practice marked entrance into Baptist society, and demanded a rejection of infant baptism.’
      • ‘This now historic activity started in 1862 when the universities ceased to have entrance examinations and ended in 1968.’
      • ‘Universities took up this work, awarding certificates which exempted the holders from university entrance examinations.’
      admission, admittance, entry, access, ingress, entrée, permission to enter, right of entry, the opportunity to enter
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • make an (or one's) entrance

    • 1(of an actor or performer) come on stage.

      • ‘Her entrance is made toward the strobe lights of center stage.’
      • ‘The only true laugh I had was when the first actor out on stage tripped and fell as she made her entrance - it was all downhill from there.’
      • ‘Witness his first speech when he makes his entrance on stage.’
      • ‘The lights dimmed, and Mr. Showmanship made his entrance, flying across the huge stage in a cocoon of feathers, enough for a whole flock of purple ostriches.’
      • ‘While protocol states I shouldn't pass critical judgment on a preview performance, it might be okay to say that by far the most entertaining part came midway through the second act, when one of the actors was attempting to make his entrance.’
      • ‘The rain came down just as the band made a spectacular entrance, abseiling on to the stage to perform their No 1 single.’
      • ‘When she made her entrance on the stage last week, she was one of the youngest nominees but already an old hand at steering the limelight her way.’
      • ‘Then the explosions make their entrance, stage left to resounding fanfare.’
      • ‘He let his band make the big entrance and then strolled on stage to astonish the masses with his powerful and flawless new take on the 1974 gem.’
      • ‘We heard his voice before he makes his entrance on stage and what a sweet voice it was.’
      1. 1.1Enter somewhere in a conspicuous or impressive way.
        ‘she slowly counted to ten before making her entrance’
        • ‘When he makes his entrance into politics, he has to win.’
        • ‘I had to sneak up on to the roof of the north stand forty minutes before making my entrance while all the safety checks were made.’
        • ‘Shortly after the writer makes his entrance, a smiling housekeeper follows with two glasses of water and then vanishes.’
        • ‘To begin, let's assume that he makes his entrance by riding horseback up to reception at the best hotel in town.’
        • ‘The six colonies joined to form a federal Commonwealth, and the labour movement made its political entrance.’
        • ‘How do they make their entrance in Australian film?’
        • ‘There will still be tall windows, so that the staff can spot an approaching regular and have his drink poured before he makes his entrance.’
        • ‘Here's Scarlet O'Hara making her entrance in a dress made out of old drapes.’
        • ‘The animals make their entrance: a tiny elephant, a lion, a monkey, a rabbit, a giant peacock, a stork, another elephant and a buffalo with a wonderfully contorting and expressive face.’
        • ‘For the fifth consecutive day, the weather was kind and the Queen and her party were able to make their entrance in horse-drawn carriages.’

Origin

Late 15th century (in the sense ‘right or opportunity of admission’): from Old French, from entrer ‘enter’.

Pronunciation

entrance

/ˈɛntr(ə)ns/

Main definitions of entrance in English

: entrance1entrance2

entrance2

verb

[with object]
  • 1Fill (someone) with wonder and delight, holding their entire attention.

    ‘I was entranced by the city's beauty’
    ‘an entrancing girl’
    • ‘Something about her just entranced me, captivated me completely and totally.’
    • ‘His short stories and novels continue to delight and entrance readers all over the world.’
    • ‘I got enough information to realize how the cave entranced visitors with its wonderful underground scenery.’
    • ‘The story has entranced audiences for decades, teaching them never to be vain and always whistle while they work.’
    • ‘You come away entranced by the good nature of the couple.’
    • ‘I was absolutely entranced, it was so delightfully madcap.’
    • ‘The most distinctive feature, his face, would entrance girls to him; that very same feature would drive them off later.’
    • ‘Yet, the bright shimmer of the production that had initially served to distract from the songs slowly, ineluctably, entranced me.’
    • ‘Even the youngest children sat entranced by the story of a young girl's Christmas dream coming to life.’
    • ‘Into this complex situation steps Leyla, a beautiful woman who entrances him at the swimming pool, with horrible results.’
    • ‘Their powerful sound echoed through the gorge and entranced the crowd.’
    • ‘There were juggling acts that seemed to defy the laws of physics, entrancing Spanish musicians using their feet and weights attached to ropes to create a hypnotic rhythm.’
    • ‘The programme has entranced fans with its comings and goings.’
    • ‘Even as a one-year-old, he was entranced by music programs on radio.’
    • ‘I had only ever seen flat, safe beaches and seas before and I was absolutely entranced by the power and beauty of this new experience.’
    • ‘I was soon entranced and the kids remained spellbound throughout.’
    • ‘From the very first notes they played, the City of Oxford Orchestra entranced the audience last Saturday.’
    • ‘Even though I'd been in groups with Tony for years, I was still entranced by the hypnotic magic of his playing.’
    • ‘The whole crowd of people were entranced by their music and even some of the performers were stopping in front of them to watch.’
    • ‘The last short stories that succeeded in totally entrancing me were those contained in the first two books by him.’
    enchant, bewitch, beguile, enrapture, captivate, capture, mesmerize, hypnotize, spellbind, hold spellbound, send into raptures, send into transports
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Cast a spell on.
      ‘Orpheus entranced the wild beasts’
      • ‘Perfomance is about the capacity to entrance by entering into a trance.’
      • ‘In many nineteenth century ballets the women are in some way entranced, under a spell, or dead.’
      • ‘She pauses a moment, partially entranced before breaking the impending spell.’
      • ‘He cast a sleeping spell on him and entranced her.’
      • ‘It had bewitched her, entranced her, and now she found that she could not tear her gaze away from him.’
      cast a spell on, put a spell on, put under a spell, put in a trance, bewitch, witch, hex, spellbind, hypnotize, mesmerize
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (formerly also as intrance): from en-, in- ‘into’ + trance.

Pronunciation

entrance

/ɛnˈtrɑːns//ɪnˈtrɑːns/