Definition of entrails in English:

entrails

plural noun

  • 1A person's or animal's intestines or internal organs, especially when removed or exposed.

    ‘a priest would find omens in the steaming entrails of a sacrificed animal’
    • ‘He would make one long incision - the length of the carcass - so that the entrails could be removed.’
    • ‘Much to my disappointment, however, this did not involve the use of animal entrails or crystal balls.’
    • ‘Battles were presented by having the men in white coats chopping up real animal entrails.’
    • ‘The 56-foot dead whale had been on a truck headed for an autopsy at a university earlier this week, when gases from internal decay caused its entrails to explode in the southern city of Tainan.’
    • ‘In ancient Rome, emperors would divine truth by reading the entrails of animals or vanquished foes.’
    • ‘Seers interpreted claps of thunder, lightning flashes or the condition of a sacrificed animal's entrails.’
    • ‘It's not quite trying to divining the future from animal entrails, but I wouldn't use it as the most definitive measure of economic life in the Valley.’
    • ‘All of them are relatively large parcels of offal mixed with cereal and enclosed in some suitable wrapping from an animal's entrails, usually the stomach.’
    • ‘It has become conventional-almost expected-that we should play the role of seer, cast the oracle bones, and examine the entrails of animals.’
    • ‘In the deluxe version, the brain was generally extracted down the nose and the entrails removed before the hollow body was dried out with salts.’
    • ‘There was also a Santeria altar, upon which animal entrails had been arrayed in hopes of bringing ill fortune to several people listed on an attached piece of paper.’
    • ‘The function of the haruspices was divination of the future from the entrails of sacrificial animals.’
    • ‘One had exposed entrails, like blood-flecked sausage.’
    • ‘Divination was accomplished by ‘reading’ the appearance and arrangement of the entrails of newly sacrificed animals such as chickens and sheep.’
    • ‘The original umbles were the innards of the deer: the liver, heart, entrails and other second-class bits.’
    • ‘Once the blood has drained, the stall-owner plucks off the feathers, removes the entrails and hands the bird over in a bag.’
    • ‘You could count the pulsing intestines and gleaming entrails in his breast.’
    • ‘I must confess I had no choice but to remove the rabbit's entrails and bones with my teeth.’
    • ‘In some cases, entrails of slaughtered animals are served back to others ‘stuck in the queue’ at slaughterhouses.’
    • ‘A large gash across the old male's abdomen glistened, his entrails exposed to the sun.’
    intestines, internal organs, bowels, guts, vital organs, viscera
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The innermost parts of something.
      ‘digging copper out of the entrails of the earth’
      • ‘To my horror, Tulsi Pipe Road was now shamefully dug up, its bowels exposed and the entrails left lying on one side for the world to see.’
      • ‘The dungeon is more like a catacomb, linking a series of tableaux that expose the grisliest entrails of York's history.’
      • ‘They descend, director and characters together, into the anal entrails and Sadean viscera of war.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French entrailles, from medieval Latin intralia, alteration of Latin interanea ‘internal things’, based on inter ‘among’.

Pronunciation

entrails

/ˈɛntreɪlz/