Definition of end in English:

end

noun

  • 1A final part of something, especially a period of time, an activity, or a story.

    ‘the end of the year’
    ‘Mario led the race from beginning to end’
    • ‘We we nearing the end of June and the trip was less than two weeks away.’
    • ‘We got the early goal, scored right at the end of the first half and got another within seconds of them getting their goal.’
    • ‘Both Governments are working towards brokering a deal before the end of next week.’
    • ‘By the end of the session they're breathing out big, solid clouds into the chill air.’
    • ‘On the evidence of this performance both sides will be in the running for honours at the end of the season.’
    • ‘On stepping on the scales just before the end of the week she exclaimed to me in terror that she had in fact gained weight.’
    • ‘At the end of the journey he wished to express his appreciation for the favour by treating me to a drink in a bar.’
    • ‘Like him or not, we're seeing the tail end of a key era in Canadian politics pass.’
    • ‘At the end of our journey, back in Zheleznitsa, we lay down by the side of the river and even had a quick dip in it.’
    • ‘At the end of this hellish journey, Japan Rail made my father pay for two more tickets.’
    • ‘We made a list and set a goal of playing at least one club on the list by summer's end.’
    • ‘Much beer was consumed, of course, and I had a bit of a nightmare journey home at the end of the night.’
    • ‘Another financial goal is to have the redecoration of our house completed by the end of March.’
    • ‘All have time-sensitive deadlines that mark the end of August.’
    • ‘The major pipe work is expected to be completed by the end of March 2005.’
    • ‘Final financial approval is expected by the end of June.’
    • ‘"Last year marked the tail end of a bad downturn in the electronics business, " he says.’
    • ‘The Kildare fire services hopes it will have contacted most guest houses by the end of this year.’
    • ‘You go out to a night club all happy and then the fights at the end of the night ruin it all.’
    • ‘Many say the two new injections could be made available to the public by end of the year.’
    • ‘There was a mighty battle in the middle of the park and at the end of it the honours were shared.’
    • ‘The first stage will be completed by the end of March.’
    conclusion, termination, ending, finish, close, resolution, climax, finale, culmination, denouement
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A termination of a state or situation.
      ‘the party called for an end to violence’
      ‘one notice will be effective to bring the tenancy to an end’
      • ‘If Labour wins its expected second landslide it will mark the end of a century of Conservative hegemony.’
      • ‘The last few weeks have seen the end of a link between Hull and the university that has been part of city life for many years.’
      • ‘For the best part of a century, that clanging sound signalled the abrupt end of an English night out.’
      • ‘Ward councillors have reacted with dismay, saying it will mean the end of historical links.’
      • ‘His initial one month deal came to an end at the weekend but the Conference side were keen to keep him there for longer.’
      • ‘The only way to dismantle the " terrorist infrastructure " would be to put an end to the occupation.’
      • ‘Grappling with insurgency appears to be the daily assignment with no end in sight.’
      • ‘Some suggested its closure signalled the end of the upmarket steakhouse era.’
    2. 1.2 Used to emphasize that something, typically a subject of discussion, is considered finished.
      ‘you will go to church and there's an end of it’
      • ‘Mistakenly, I think that's the end of it.’
      • ‘Mr Monks added: "That was the end of it, there was no awkwardness."’
      • ‘She accepted that she might be mistaken about this point - so that is an end of it.’
      • ‘As far as we are concerned that is the end of it.’
      • ‘" You would no longer be any daughter of mine and there's an end of it!’
      • ‘Her mother said: "OK, that's the end of it."’
    3. 1.3 A person's death.
      ‘he realized that his end was near’
      ‘he would meet his end at the hands of a sorcerer’
      • ‘That was the end of her career on that ship, and Big Sal nearly gave up the ocean going life for one of nursery nursing.’
      • ‘I really thought that it was the end for jazz, that it would never recover.’
      • ‘By having four boys as it turned out, did that put a dead end to your career?’
      • ‘It was hardly the most glorious end for a man who had cheated death so many times in so many of the world's wilder places.’
      • ‘The deal signalled the end for group founder MacKenzie, who has since made his exit.’
      • ‘A scandal is upon me, certain to bring an abrupt end to my political career unless you help me.’
      death, dying, demise, passing, passing on, passing away, expiration, expiry
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4archaic (in biblical use) an ultimate state or condition.
      ‘the end of that man is peace’
  • 2The furthest or most extreme part of something.

    ‘the church at the end of the road’
    as modifier ‘the end house’
    • ‘She did a few laps, and then at one end of the pool, stopped to take a breather and relax.’
    • ‘They could travel from one end of the city to the other and never see the light of day.’
    • ‘Take your nail and place it so that the pointed end rests against the top of the block of wood.’
    • ‘The precast-concrete panels were attached to the steel ribs at the quarter points of the panels, with the top and bottom ends left unsupported.’
    • ‘They have put signs up at each end stating there have been eighteen deaths in two years.’
    • ‘It seemed to me as if the sky split open from one end to the other to rain down fire.’
    • ‘Place the nail or paper clip at one end of the coil and then connect the coil to the battery.’
    • ‘As he does, we see a door at the far end of the hallway slightly open.’
    • ‘She grabbed one of the ropes and tied one end to a four by four that was supporting the roof.’
    • ‘This one sounded tired, as if the owner had just run from one end of the world to the other.’
    • ‘The axle of the truck is a rod the goes from one end of the hangar to the other and sticks out on both sides.’
    • ‘I couldn't even see the far end of the tunnel.’
    • ‘Alternatively, you can telephone the phone numbers given at the end of this piece.’
    • ‘They live in a stark, unpainted, concrete house at the end of a five-mile dirt road.’
    • ‘A door opened and slammed shut again at the far end of the hallway.’
    • ‘None of them knew which end of the club to hold five years ago, and all of them can now play well.’
    • ‘In some cases, gable end cladding can be replaced with space sheeting.’
    • ‘At one end of the line, was a man with a large soupspoon dishing out a brown meaty stew.’
    • ‘Laura sat curled up at one end of her bed, a book in hand and a notebook in the other.’
    • ‘He drew up a chair at one end of the table, motioning for me to do the same as he took a sip from his cup of coffee.’
    • ‘On the floor just below the north tower there was a balcony with statues on each end of it.’
    • ‘Where once it took three hours to get from one end of the island to the other, it now takes one.’
    • ‘The door of the house at the end of the street is open and anyone is welcome in.’
    • ‘Bend one end of each ribbon and seal edge only with fabric glue to form the rod pocket.’
    • ‘The cashier will also be moved to the opposite end of the service area to improve customer flow.’
    • ‘The dog should be put on a leash and the owner and the dog should stand at one end of a hallway or a room.’
    extremity, furthermost part, limit, margin, edge, border, boundary, periphery
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    1. 2.1British A small piece that is left after use.
      ‘an ashtray full of cigarette ends’
      • ‘For example 9 billion cigarette ends get dropped around Australia every year.’
      • ‘Some hang on to so-called stub ends, a few shares held for old time's sake, even though they decided to sell out of a position.’
      butt, stub, stump, remnant, fragment, vestige
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A part or person's share of an activity.
      ‘you're going to honour your end of the deal’
      • ‘If she isn't holding up her end of the deal than she should get a job and bring in some income.’
      • ‘It probably is a cautionary tale for the rest of us who are in this end of the business.’
    3. 2.3 A specified extreme of a scale.
      ‘homebuyers at the lower end of the market’
      • ‘At extreme ends of the scale, the choice as to what you can grow is limited to plants that are suitable to either acid or lime.’
      • ‘At the other end of the scale of size, at the atomic and subatomic level, another great mystery resides.’
      • ‘All of us work along a spectrum with emotions at one end and the intellect at the other.’
      • ‘The table gives the official minima for combinations at opposite ends of the spectrum.’
      • ‘These two devices mark the bottom and top ends of the mid-market respectively, Quantum said.’
      • ‘The majority of offences committed by juveniles are not at the serious end of the scale.’
      • ‘At the opposite end of the scale, Charlton went all season without earning a single spot-kick.’
      • ‘Would it not have been better to invest that money in raising the level of grants at the lower end of the scale?’
      • ‘Visitors will have the chance to eavesdrop on preparations for two weddings involving women at opposite ends of the social scale.’
      • ‘It has gambled on ventures elsewhere in the world to get a bigger share of the luxury end of the market.’
      • ‘So how does the low end of the performance scale do here?’
      • ‘Today, the companies are vastly different operations and producing returns at opposite ends of the scale for their owners.’
      • ‘Coffee house patrons from all ends of the political spectrum rebelled and eleven days later the coffee houses were reopened and their numbers continued to increase.’
      • ‘But the hottest souvenir buy this year comes from the other end of the fashion scale.’
      • ‘However, at the other end of the scale the worst site was at Ballybeg which had been a problem for a long time.’
      • ‘People from what would be considered opposite ends of the social spectrum mingle openly.’
      • ‘This poverty coexists with obscene wealth at the other end of the social scale.’
      • ‘And its not just those at the lower end of the economic scale who are feeling the pinch.’
      • ‘Folks at the upper end of the scale also pay the vast bulk of income taxes in the country.’
      • ‘A structural shift in the nature of the public markets means that opportunities for venture capitalists that weren't there previously are now arising at both ends of the deal spectrum.’
      • ‘The market has changed from having a top end, a middle market and a lower end.’
      • ‘During a space mission, astronauts and their spacecraft are exposed to temperature extremes on both ends of the scale.’
      • ‘It is not just at the larger end of the deal spectrum where firms appear to be struggling to find good deals.’
      • ‘Only those at opposite ends of the social scale joined up.’
      aspect, side, section, area, field, part, share, portion, segment, province
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    4. 2.4 Either of two places linked by a telephone call, letter, or journey.
      ‘‘Hello,’ said a voice at the other end’
      • ‘Despite demonstrating I attempted to purchase a ticket at both ends of my journey and enclosing a copy of a travelcard I bought, my appeal was rejected.’
      • ‘These chocolate soldiers of the air breeze past their human cargo apparently determined to avoid eye contact at both ends of the journey.’
      • ‘When I got out of the tube at the other end of my journey, his voicemail was waiting for me.’
      • ‘Fantastic routes do go down other sides of the mountain though, with their ends linked to free bus connections heading back to the lifts, hotels or bars.’
      • ‘He recommends that the southern end of the link should go ahead in the short-term.’
      • ‘Sometimes I would buy a ticket from the machine at the other end of my journey, then rip it up and put it in the bin.’
      • ‘At the end of the journey, I feel as if I've reached a sort of Velocipede's nirvana.’
    5. 2.5 Either of the halves of a sports field or court defended by one team or player.
      ‘when they changed ends, the goals kept coming’
      • ‘He has become timid at both ends of the court, and his playing time has been cut.’
      • ‘He demands that his players play both ends of the court.’
      • ‘Warrick works hard at both ends and is a team player.’
      • ‘Martin plays well on both ends of the court, unlike those one-dimensional players.’
      • ‘Ham consistently plays team basketball on both ends of the court-a concept his teammates don't embrace.’
      • ‘The team needs consistency on both ends of the court.’
      • ‘Although he still is overpowered at times, Miles has been very effective at both ends of the court playing closer to the basket.’
      • ‘Saunders always has used a team approach on both ends of the court.’
      • ‘Wallace led the onslaught with his sparkling play and boundless energy on both ends of the court.’
      • ‘Both players were trying to dominate with fast, attacking shots and they shared the next two ends to take it to a deciding set.’
      • ‘One rule in tennis is that every other game you switch ends of the court with your opponent.’
      • ‘Goalless at the end of normal time, the teams changed ends for extra-time.’
      • ‘A tireless, relentless player at both ends of the court, he is always in the middle of the action and seems to have a knack for coming up with the ball.’
  • 3A goal or desired result.

    ‘each would use the other to further his own ends’
    ‘to this end, schools were set up for peasant women’
    • ‘Sadly this often results in the initiative itself becoming the end in itself rather than the means to it.’
    • ‘But on the other hand, if we are down about life, and unsure of our ends and goals, enhancement technologies won't help us.’
    • ‘In other words, no one can prove conclusively we are lying, so we will continue to lie in order to further our own ends.’
    • ‘Surely the administration would not resort to blackmailing us into allowing the use of the airport to further their own ends?’
    • ‘Human action is the purposeful striving after desired ends.’
    • ‘He was happy to use me to further his own ends, secure in the knowledge that he'd take me out with virtually no effort when the time came.’
    • ‘So he obviously developed a way to use nationalism and identity to further his own ends.’
    • ‘Indeed, it is arguable that one can only achieve ones ends by engaging in means that those who oppose you will understand and that will hurt them seriously enough to make them take notice.’
    • ‘Our ends and values are shared with others and conditioned by the societies in which we live.’
    • ‘The Respondent, on the face of it to further his own ends but also in his view to further the wishes of the assignors, dealt with the matter in such a way that he simply cut out the input of the assignors' solicitors.’
    • ‘This refers to a group of persons who participate in common activity and experience a psychological sense of togetherness as shared ends are sought.’
    • ‘The religious leader said politicians were trying to use religion to further their own ends, using sectarian violence as a tool.’
    • ‘If you have caused his family any unnecessary pain to further your own ends, then you do not deserve to be in his life at all.’
    • ‘To this end I believe that the County Board must act now before an incident like this ends tragically.’
    • ‘This view fuelled an increasingly ruthless pursuit of methods by which to harness nature for purely utilitarian ends, motivated by desire for control, power and wealth.’
    • ‘Carla and Paul are drawn to each other, forming a strange partnership, partially fueled by somewhat repressed desire, as well as their willingness to use each other to further their own ends.’
    • ‘So if we believe that economic growth is what makes societies happy, promoting innovation can be this way linked to human ends.’
    • ‘But the only people who share identical ends for the identical reasons with identical intensity are identical people.’
    • ‘Some might try and use those deaths for their own ends, or to justify their belief that we should never have walked this path.’
    • ‘In brief, shared ends are insufficient to anchor the liberal polity; there must be shared justifications as well.’
    aim, goal, purpose, objective, object, grail, holy grail, target, mission
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  • 4(in bowls and curling) a session of play in one particular direction across the playing area.

  • 5A lineman positioned nearest the sideline.

    ‘a defensive end’
    • ‘His presence was also valuable in set pieces at both ends of the pitch.’
    • ‘The ends line up directly in front of the offensive tackles.’
    • ‘The team puts four ends on the field and gets heavy pressure without blitzing.’
    • ‘"He's one of the top defensive ends in this league, " Lewis says.’
    • ‘They are, however, ready to finally have a decent receiving tight end.’
    • ‘He was a pass-rushing defensive end in college.’

verb

  • 1Come or bring to a final point; finish.

    no object ‘when the war ended, policy changed’
    ‘the chapter ends with a case study’
    with object ‘she wanted to end the relationship’
    • ‘Another version ends with the death of the gang members and their leader.’
    • ‘The meeting in Geneva thus ended abruptly in high-visibility failure.’
    • ‘Make sure every training session ends on a happy note, this is crucial.’
    • ‘His career was prematurely ended by his tragic death in a plane crash in 1939 at the age of 55.’
    • ‘The season ends on a positive note with the beginnings of a more experienced team.’
    • ‘There could not be a better way to end what has been a great campaign.’
    • ‘The first season's contest ends on Thursday.’
    • ‘After all, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire begins with a nightmare and ends with a death.’
    • ‘The campaign and the European war officially ended at midnight on 8 May 1945.’
    • ‘Death ends life before you have a chance to learn and live.’
    • ‘The sale of this house ends yet another tradition.’
    • ‘The film ends with the death of the kestrel at the hands of the boy's older brother in brutal retribution for a bet he didn't place.’
    • ‘Here the film ends on a high note, suggesting that the experience is a positive one.’
    • ‘Improbably yet convincingly, the film ends on an optimistic note.’
    • ‘When the interview ends, you share a burst of laughter with your mates because of the near miss.’
    • ‘The first half, which was full of excellent football, ended scoreless.’
    • ‘The waiter arrived with our meals, effectively ending our conversation.’
    • ‘The opera ends not with the death of Rusalka and the Prince, but with Rusalka's sexual thawing.’
    • ‘For folks of my political persuasion, last year ended on a very bleak note.’
    • ‘Some faculty members find the prospect of abruptly ending their academic careers distasteful and choose instead to postpone retirement.’
    • ‘We do not believe that life ends with this death.’
    • ‘The deal ends two weeks of consolidations in the sector.’
    • ‘The year ended on a positive note with their films performing well at the box-office.’
    • ‘The French midfield star's dazzling season was prematurely ended by a knee injury he picked up last week.’
    finish, conclude, terminate, come to an end, draw to a close, close, stop, cease
    break off, call off, bring to an end, put an end to, call a halt to, halt, stop, drop, finish, terminate, discontinue, dissolve, cancel, annul
    destroy, put an end to, extinguish, snuff out, do away with, wipe out, take
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Reach a point and go no further.
      ‘the surfaced road ends at the farm’
      • ‘An alley runs from 12th Street behind the entire strip, and it ends before reaching 13th in a concrete wall.’
      • ‘It was still rather foggy out, so I couldn't tell where the dirt path ends or begins.’
      • ‘The K, or critical point, marks where the landing area ends and the hill begins to flatten out.’
      • ‘A winding road that ends at the back of the property in a shady grove of trees reaches the main office.’
      • ‘The two men fell out over where their respective remits began and ended.’
      • ‘The universe is so large that we can not even fathom where it ends or begins.’
      • ‘You see our district had no boundaries that we knew of, so we had to find out where it began and ended, if it did at all.’
      • ‘Where the top blade ends, the bottom blade makes a beveled angle of thirty degrees until the sharp tip is even with the edge of the upper blade.’
      • ‘It ends when we reach the quantum limit to computing speeds.’
      • ‘But there's a strange exception to this doctrine. It ends when you reach America's shores.’
      • ‘It is hard now to identify at what point high principle ended and pre-election politicking began.’
      • ‘A few kilometres from the last former Soviet army checkpoint, the tarmac ends and the journey to Ground Zero continues off-road, across the parched and endless steppe.’
      • ‘Following the course of these small island spate rivers to where their journey ends and heather turns to sand is a fine way to fish.’
    2. 1.2no object Perform a final act.
      ‘the man ended by attacking a police officer’
      • ‘Frankie thanked the fans for all the support, and ended by pledging that he'd be back.’
      • ‘It ends perfectly, with a satisfyingly decisive, koto-like twang.’
      • ‘It ended by adding a word of caution.’
      • ‘He ended by saying that the agreement provides for disputes to be resolved by adjudication.’
      • ‘The bishop ended by apologising for upsetting his flock and saying he had been honoured to serve the Church.’
      • ‘Both the French and the Russian version of utopianism ended by drenching their countries in blood.’
      • ‘The letter ends by saying: ‘The doctor has been reminded of his responsibilities with respect to all of these issues.’’
    3. 1.3end inno object Have as its final part or result.
      ‘the match ended in a draw’
      • ‘Mexico has won seven times, and four matches ended in a draw.’
      • ‘But after their two children were born, the marriage went downhill, eventually ending in divorce.’
      • ‘Remember their fine display against Dublin this time a year ago when the match ended in a draw?’
      • ‘As the game drew to a close, it seemed a fairly even match would end in defeat on all four rinks.’
      • ‘This is true, he says, despite the fact that almost one in three marriages eventually ends in divorce.’
      • ‘The Josephians are unbeaten this season having played eleven matches and all ending in no decision.’
      • ‘We've all heard the statistic that half of all marriages end in divorce.’
      • ‘There was very little between the teams and it was appropriate that the match ended in a draw.’
      • ‘It was the first one-day international final to end in a tie and only the fourth in England's history.’
      • ‘To date all the matches had ended in a stalemate.’
      • ‘The encounter ends in a draw and everyone, young and old, is friends again.’
      • ‘It is a love that cannot last, a love that must be terminated or will end in death.’
      • ‘Caroline's two previous marriages ended in disaster.’
      • ‘As he tells the BBC, there's no point undertaking a project out of malice as it usually ends in bad results.’
      • ‘That was the third and last time Kent visited these parts and it was the only game that ended in a definite result.’
      • ‘Glenda was nursing a broken heart after her first marriage ended in divorce.’
      • ‘The floral notes came through in the flavour, matched with a real wheaty balance and ending in a crisp dry finish.’
      • ‘My argument was that whenever I watch even part of a football match, it ends in a penalty shoot-out.’
      • ‘They might have expected to finish last but both ended in fifth place scoring vital points for the team.’
    4. 1.4end upno object Eventually come to a specified place or situation.
      ‘I ended up in Eritrea’
      ‘you could end up with a higher income’
      • ‘It seems that every politician who presumes to lecture us on the way we should live ends up being ridiculed.’
      • ‘If your money ends up in a right muddle, you could lose the roof over your head.’
      • ‘Whatever the intent, the film ends up being none of these things.’
      • ‘City had led in their first meeting at half-time only to end up losing.’
      • ‘I especially like the way the burglar ends up joining them for a cup of tea at the end!’
      • ‘In fact, most of the songs end up sounding virtually the same.’
      • ‘Sport can be very cruel when a team plays its best football for years and ends up with nothing.’
      • ‘In such circumstances being more open with the press and the public ends up making things worse.’
      • ‘Traditional salt usually ends up at the side of the road because it cannot stick when the surface is damp.’
      • ‘Entering the Bridge Hotel we followed the signs eventually ending up in a dark panelled bar.’
      • ‘It's going to be interesting to see where it ends up some ten years from now.’
      • ‘My opinion is that people take it from their mouths, toss it towards the bin but it misses and ends up on the floor.’
      • ‘I never thought that I would end up falling in love with her too.’
      • ‘At his age, he's unsure about where he'll end up working.’
      • ‘He eventually ended up working for a shipping company guiding boats to enter the port.’
      • ‘Why do you people think that Ryo and I are going to somehow end up falling in love?’
      • ‘Eventually we both got tired and he ended up staying in the spare bedroom.’
      • ‘If he does end up staying, he'll have a difficult time adjusting.’
      • ‘Trying to juggle too many things at once, she sometimes fears she ends up not doing any of them well.’
      • ‘You'd think his talents would give him at least some benefit in the situations where he ends up in combat.’
      • ‘It is the curse of the diplomat who, in attempting to please everyone, ends up pleasing nobody.’
      finish up, land up, arrive, find oneself, turn up, come, go, appear
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • all ends up

    • informal Completely.

      • ‘He does brilliantly to clear a shot off the line after Marcos was beaten all ends up by a Brazilian whose identity remains a mystery to me.’
      • ‘It's one thing to be beaten all ends up from start to finish, but quite another to be solid most of the time and then throw in a poor scrum for no obvious reason.’
      • ‘The ball came flying across and my attempted clearance beat our own goalkeeper all ends up, rocketing into the corner of the net.’
      • ‘He had had enough of this Dutch mastery and plowed through the Dutch and banged in a lightening strike as the Dutch goalkeeper was beaten all ends up.’
      • ‘The ‘keeper was beaten all ends up by a rising Curran shot in the 11 th minute of the second half.’
      • ‘United surged forward and he let rip with a daisy-cutter into the bottom left which had the keeper beaten all ends up.’
  • at the end of the day

    • informal When everything is taken into consideration.

      ‘at the end of the day I'm responsible for what happens in the school’
      • ‘I think it is all about money at the end of the day and I don't think it should be.’
      • ‘And at the end of the day that is what trust in political leadership has to be all about.’
      • ‘Yet, at the end of the day, it's just another lousy Hollywood movie, so why all the fuss?’
      • ‘By the very nature of the job, one side will hate you at the end of the day.’
      • ‘I really hope it can be saved from closure but it is down to the Post Office at the end of the day.’
      • ‘I continued to study mathematics, and at the end of the day, that is what my degree is in.’
      • ‘Either way, the fish farmers will, once more, doubtlessly turn a profit at the end of the day.’
      • ‘Quite a lot of people have written us off, but at the end of the day that suits us.’
      • ‘Besides which, at the end of the day, I still have the love of you, my dear, dear readers.’
      • ‘If, at the end of the day, the decision becomes that of the patient, then how could it lead to murder?’
      • ‘But, at the end of the day, they still do not have last say as to where your site will be listed.’
      • ‘But I should just not go into that because it is the choice of the woman at the end of the day not the man.’
      • ‘That, at the end of the day, may be his biggest achievement in the game that has made him a rich man.’
      • ‘But at the end of the day there are policemen actually who are beginning to speak up.’
      • ‘Because at the end of the day, nobody wants to make a decision which might affect their whole career.’
      ultimately, eventually, in the end, in the long run, at length, finally, sooner or later, in time, in the fullness of time, after some time, in the final analysis, when all is said and done, one day, some day, sometime, at last, at long last
      View synonyms
    • informal

      see end
  • be at (or have come to) an end

    • 1Be finished or completed.

      ‘negotiations were virtually at an end’
      • ‘The spokesman for the environmental group says the research has come to an end and should be concluded.’
      • ‘‘The talks with officials had come to an end, but before we concluded they came up with the new issue which did not concern us,’ he said.’
      • ‘It is clear that, if a contract did exist and was at an end, then negotiations can continue.’
      • ‘They insisted that although they still wanted negotiations to continue they had to regard them has having come to an end.’
      • ‘Only when these issues have been addressed and the occupation has come to an end will democracy cease to be an empty concept.’
      • ‘As this young soldier realises his life has come to an end, he stops and he thinks.’
      • ‘It was only as a result of a threat of legal action by the developer that the dispute had come to an end.’
      • ‘He said: ‘Now the money is at an end the Tourism Partnership ceases to exist.’’
      • ‘The signs weren't looking good last week but indeed after this past week's events I think it's safe to conclude that our time on this planet has come to an end.’
      • ‘They do not cease to exist even after the body has come to an end.’
      1. 1.1(of a supply of something) become exhausted.
        ‘our patience has come to an end’
        • ‘I've been respectful, accepting, and tolerant, but my patience is at an end.’
        • ‘‘That promise has not been kept and, speaking personally, my patience is at an end on this issue,’ he said.’
        • ‘However, it turns out that the social-democratic electorate's patience has come to an end.’
        • ‘Fire Brigades' Union delegates emerged from a national meeting after deciding their patience was at an end and they had no option but to stage a new, 24-hour walkout.’
        • ‘A storm is brewing, patience is at an end, and war looks inevitable.’
        • ‘Graduate trainees, who said ‘their patience had come to an end,’ have accused the government of political interference in appointments.’
        • ‘Within two minutes, however, it was Sanft touching down at the other end and adding the goal points.’
        • ‘By mid-September the emissary's patience was at an end.’
        • ‘I have no idea as to how long he had been waiting, but it was clear that it was his turn and his patience was at an end, you might say.’
        • ‘But the evidence now suggests that their patience is at an end.’
  • be at the end of

    • Be close to having no more of (something)

      ‘she was at the end of her patience’
      • ‘Unfortunately, they were at the end of the batch.’
      • ‘Mrs Murphy, whose family run a manufacturing plant on the estate, said they were at the end of their tether.’
  • be the end

    • informal Be the limit of what one can tolerate.

      ‘you really are the end!’
  • come to (or meet) a sticky end

    • Be led by one's own actions to ruin or an unpleasant death.

      ‘behave yourself or you will come to a sticky end!’
      • ‘Apparently in the 33 years they have been parachuting at Cark, only three skydivers have met a sticky end and all were pros doing tricky jumps.’
      • ‘One police source said: ‘If they start criminal activities I think they'll come to a sticky end.’’
      • ‘Many others who, in classical times, hungered after gold came to a sticky end.’
      • ‘And all cowards come to a sticky end, sweetheart, whether you like it or not.’
      • ‘He's gonna come to a sticky end if he keeps this up.’
      • ‘History is littered with many an aimless younger sibling who has come to a sticky end through no fault other than the fact that he was the second born.’
      • ‘Historically, imperialism always comes to a sticky end, thank God.’
      • ‘It was a promising start but the initiative came to a sticky end.’
      • ‘It wasn't a surprise for Dance to play a character who comes to a sticky end.’
      • ‘And he doesn't mind playing the ‘bad guy’ who eventually meets a sticky end.’
  • end of story

    • informal Used to emphasize that there is nothing to add on a matter just mentioned.

      ‘Men don't cry in public. End of story’
    • informal

      see end
      • ‘Juveniles are not put in with adults, end of story.’
      • ‘Our campaign is not going to be about one big bang and that's it, end of story.’
      • ‘Winning is success, losing is failure - end of story.’
      • ‘Pupils here are in school all day, no exceptions, end of story.’
      • ‘Business should be run by businessmen - end of story.’
      • ‘I work long hours, I'm on an average wage, end of story.’
      • ‘I went to a party; I had a little too much to drink, end of story.’
      • ‘I knew it wasn't the full story, the investigators knew it wasn't the full story but it was the statement that was going to be made, end of story.’
      • ‘They are getting phased out of the picture, end of story.’
      • ‘From now on I'm doing the disciplining around here, end of story.’
  • end one's days (or life)

    • Spend the final part of one's life in a specified place or state.

      ‘she ended her days in London’
      • ‘George goes off the rails again, ending his days in The Chelsea Hotel in New York.’
      • ‘As he boarded a plane from Manchester last February he was looking forward to ending his days in the bosom of his new-found family.’
      • ‘A young soldier answers the call to fight for King and country, and ends his days in a society that disputes the necessity of soldiering.’
      • ‘He ends his life as a bankrupt and a dependant of Flashman's aristocratic father-in-law.’
      • ‘There are various stories doing the rounds over the past few year as to why Gavin is not ending his days at the Showgrounds where his experience would be a decided asset to a team bereft of wise heads.’
      • ‘And Bertram, full of the most charisma and promise as a youth, ends his days as a minor and mildly eccentric academic.’
  • an end in itself

    • A goal that is pursued in its own right to the exclusion of others.

      ‘competition is not an end in itself’
      • ‘State power, in that context, is a means to an end, not an end in itself.’
      • ‘Now winning, or doing well in that competition appears to be an end in itself.’
      • ‘Children must be made to know that they exist for the society in which they live, rather than seeing the family as an end in itself.’
      • ‘It is a means toward a goal rather than an end in itself.’
      • ‘Though Cha took an intellectual approach to art making, theory was not an end in itself.’
      • ‘Selling quality food overseas is not just an end in itself.’
      • ‘Affirmative action is not an end in itself, but an instrument in the struggle for anti-racist movement.’
      • ‘In some cases the process of seeking someone to blame has even become an end in itself and seems to lead some people even further astray.’
      • ‘They are, of course, immune to the notion of money as an end in itself.’
      • ‘We do not believe that it can be pursued as an end in itself.’
      • ‘Any rational nation will treat the U.N. as a means to pursue its ends, not as an end in itself.’
  • end in tears

    • Have an unhappy or unpleasant outcome.

      ‘this treaty will end in tears’
      • ‘The outcome nearly always ends in tears, with tantrums on both sides and withheld fees.’
      • ‘The battle to save the Special School ended in tears and acrimony this week when councillors voted to close it.’
      • ‘These women follow the same pattern in their dealings with the media: first they are used by Fleet Street, then they try to use Fleet Street, then it all ends in tears.’
      • ‘It wouldn't be right for you to get involved in this kind of relationship because from experience it nearly always ends in tears.’
      • ‘Meanwhile Bobby and his friends start a rock group but it all ends in tears.’
      • ‘Of course, the story ends in tears for him.’
      • ‘Either no one listens, or you get all carried away and proclaim yourselves as prophets, and it all ends in tears and fireballs.’
      • ‘The tragedy is that the love affair looks like ending in tears.’
      • ‘In my experience, close proximity ends in tears more than anything else.’
      • ‘And, on both occasions, it all ended in tears.’
      • ‘It always ends in tears when prime ministers think too much of their place in history instead of simply trying harder to govern the country well.’
  • end it all

    • Commit suicide.

      ‘his life was meaningless without Coleen, so he would end it all’
      • ‘Elsewhere, Beth and Angel are debating the relative merits of hanging and drugs as methods of ending it all.’
      • ‘Should we, if we know we haven't got long to live, be allowed to take the option of ending it all?’
      • ‘He decided one day that enough was enough and ended it all, and left me with a new-born baby and two other children to cope with on my own.’
      • ‘‘There were times when I really wanted to end it all because life was just so awful and helpless,’ she said.’
      • ‘Not all of us have been in a situation when you watch someone die slowly and painfully but I'm sure we can all imagine. Wouldn't it be so much easier if they could end it all?’
      • ‘For those who are alone and lonely, that anonymous, comforting voice on the other end of the line might be one thing that prevents them from ending it all, there and then.’
      • ‘For the sake of her children, she decided to battle on against the virus instead of ending it all by killing herself.’
      • ‘I had a ‘dark night of the soul’ and even considered ending it all, but I got through it and decided to use my talents to help others.’
      • ‘I wouldn't want anyone to get the idea that having my mother staying with me this week has led me to thoughts of ending it all.’
      • ‘Several times now I have contemplated ending it all.’
      • ‘On a cold January night, he decided to end it all by drowning himself.’
      • ‘At one point a couple of years ago, he says, he thought about ending it all, going out after one last amazing, self-destructive bender.’
      • ‘Van Gogh said the only solution was to end it all.’
      • ‘Without hope, thousands prefer to end it all by swallowing pesticide.’
      • ‘She begged her best friend to help her to end it all, but her friend, too afraid of going to prison, could do nothing but watch helplessly, unable to ease her best friend's suffering.’
      • ‘You do feel despair and I know a lot of people do contemplate ending it all.’
  • the end justifies the means

    • Wrong or unfair methods may be used if the overall goal is good.

      ‘we excuse our greed by claiming that the end justifies the means’
      • ‘Maybe at some point he fell into the trap of believing the end justifies the means, that it's OK to mislead somebody to get them to say what you need them to say, because the message is more important than how you get the message.’
      • ‘A career cop who followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, he believes the end justifies the means.’
      • ‘When the end justifies the means, then everything is permitted.’
      • ‘When it comes to winning arguments, they seem to think that the end justifies the means and that truth is an irrelevance.’
      • ‘I understand that for them the end justifies the means, but I can't help worrying about where society will eventually draw the line.’
      • ‘But I still cannot believe in the idea that the end justifies the means.’
      • ‘There is a train of thought in some political circles that the end justifies the means.’
      • ‘It does not matter how it happens, the end justifies the means.’
      • ‘I don't accept that the end justifies the means and I've taken a strong stand on that within the union movement and will continue to do so.’
      • ‘It's drama at the end of the day, and it's up to the audience to decide if the end justifies the means.’
  • the end of the road (or line)

    • The point beyond which progress or survival cannot continue.

      ‘if the damages award is not lowered it could be the end of the road for the publisher’
      ‘they've been offered compensation and they'll accept, but only because they feel they've reached the end of the line’
      • ‘For the little biotech company, it may be the end of the road, their destruction.’
      • ‘In Los Angeles, motorway capital of the world, car chaos has taken the city to the end of the road.’
      • ‘Some say it's the end of the road for players like Paul and others.’
      • ‘A meeting will take place today to decide if it is the end of the road for workers at the plant.’
      • ‘This week, as in previous years, a number of politicians some nice and some barely competent, have come to the end of the road.’
      • ‘Police will start using a new radio system today meaning the end of the road for eavesdroppers who listened in to police messages.’
      • ‘It is the end of the road for these buses, as the company has been sold off amid a huge backlog of repairs and maintenance work.’
      • ‘It marks the end of the road for him and for all who bullied and killed in his name.’
      • ‘After 170 years of wacky inventions and strange new models, it seems we may finally be at the end of the road for the electric car.’
  • the end of one's tether

    • see end
      at one's wits' end, desperate, not knowing which way to turn, unable to cope
      View synonyms
    • Having no patience or energy left to cope with something.

      ‘I don't know what to do. I'm at the end of my tether’
      ‘these individuals have reached the end of their tether’
      • ‘There's no need to wait until you are at the end of your tether before you come here.’
      • ‘But, when it's an individual who is obviously very distressed and at the end of their tether and upset, you feel heart-sorry for them.’
      • ‘The ad, which speaks to a patient at the end of his rope, states, ‘If you have advanced HIV, your options are limited.’’
      • ‘Gardeners are near the end of their tether because of youngsters rampaging through their allotment, leaving a trail of devastation behind them.’
      • ‘Neighbours are also at the end of their tether with the trouble.’
      • ‘He said children had repeatedly kicked a football at his gable end wall for two years and that the thudding had brought him and his wife, Sue, to the end of their tether.’
      • ‘She said she can't cope with it anymore as she's at the end of her tether.’
      • ‘We have some members of the group who have reached the end of their tether and feel they can't go on.’
      • ‘‘It's at crisis point, teachers are at the end of their tether,’ he said.’
      • ‘Residents are at the end of their tether with regard to youth crime in the area.’
      • ‘I am at the end of my tether and I feel that I can no longer cope with the behaviour of the defendant and her family.’
      • ‘A lot of residents are at the end of their tether and I don't think he realises exactly what he has done.’
  • the end of the world

    • 1The termination of life on the earth.

      • ‘The Earth and the inhabitants of the planet were preparing for the end of the world.’
      • ‘It had seemed like the end of the world, with explosions like one would picture with Armageddon.’
      • ‘Interesting examples of this occur with doomsday cults, which set dates and times for the end of the world.’
      • ‘And we have become almost immune to those harbingers of doom who foretell the end of the world.’
      • ‘People screamed and flung themselves face down upon the earth fearing it was the end of the world.’
      • ‘That was how the prophets of doom predicted the end of the world at midnight on the millennium.’
      1. 1.1informal A complete disaster.
        ‘it's not the end of the world if we draw’
        • ‘A defeat on January 12, while not spelling the end of the world, would hardly do morale all that much good.’
        • ‘It would be great to make a million dollars but if we don't, that's not exactly the end of the world..’
        • ‘There will be some who will proclaim this result a disaster, the end of the world.’
        • ‘Lets face it - contrary to the hysteria - missing out on a first-round offer is not the end of the world.’
        • ‘‘It was like the end of the world for the whole family, when this happened to Lydia,’ he said.’
        • ‘It's not the end of the world if everything doesn't work out to your expectations.’
        • ‘Leaving it a little more open-ended wouldn't be the end of the world.’
        • ‘But by now you will all have gotten those dreaded results and you will know that it is not, in fact, the end of the world at all.’
        • ‘Relax, take a deep breath and remember, it's not the end of the world.’
        • ‘It's also the end of the world if another actor is singled out for praise, especially if you have a similar-sized part.’
        • ‘Go back to read the Hansard report from 1954 when commercial television was being launched and the view then was that it was the end of the world.’
        • ‘She learned that it wasn't the end of the world to try really hard to achieve something and then not win.’
        • ‘Suffering from diabetes does not have to mean the end of the world.’
        • ‘It's not the end of the world, it only really matters if I apply to grad school.’
        • ‘Fear of failure is a bona fide force but, fall just once, and you'll see that failing is not the end of the world.’
        • ‘So defeat at Spurs last night was not the end of the world.’
        • ‘But it is not the end of the world - even though it feels like it right now!’
  • end on

    • 1With the end of an object facing towards one.

      ‘seen end on, their sharp summits point like arrows’
      1. 1.1With the end of an object touching that of another.
        ‘stone tiles had been layered end on with incredible skill’
        • ‘For three blocks the surrounding streets have been closed off except to motorcycles and as far as the eye can see Harleys are parked end on to the curb.’
        edgewise, sidewards, side first, edgeways, end on
        View synonyms
  • end to end

    • In a row with the end of one object touching that of another.

      ‘bales were laid end to end for a delivery’
      • ‘Pipes often need to be connected end to end to reach from one roadside to the other.’
      • ‘If every Barbie doll ever manufactured were laid end to end, they would circle the earth three and a half times.’
      • ‘Once he has reached that figure he will begin laying the coins end to end to try and form the longest line of pennies ever.’
      • ‘They are planning to surround their school with coins placed end to end.’
      • ‘If they had been laid end to end, the trees would measure 12 times the height of Blackpool Tower!’
      • ‘If all the glass, wine and beer bottles were laid end to end, they would stretch from Ireland to Sri Lanka.’
      • ‘If you laid all your blood vessels out end to end, they would wrap twice around the equator.’
      • ‘Well, imagine laying standard playing cards end to end from New York to San Francisco.’
  • get (or have) one's end away

    • vulgar slang Have sexual intercourse.

  • get one's end in

    • vulgar slang Have sexual intercourse.

  • in the end

    • Eventually or on reflection.

      ‘in the end, I saw that she was right’
      • ‘It may cost a little more to do it that way but in the end their passengers would think better of them for it.’
      • ‘I wasn't keen on the first part of the gas mask story, but it all worked out in the end.’
      • ‘What is a challenge worth when there is no prize in the end to make up for the travails?’
      • ‘He has got there in the end, even if the work he has put in has been free labour.’
      • ‘We lost heavily in the end, but it never looked like it was going to happen that way.’
      • ‘I think we got it right in the end, but it'll be a surprise tomorrow to see what happens.’
      • ‘This film will make you laugh and make you cry and fall in love and feel good in the end.’
      • ‘My Dad stayed behind in the end as they didn't think I was fit enough to be left alone.’
      • ‘The plot is basically about unrequited love and the boy ending up with the right girl in the end.’
      • ‘Moralising on the basis of hurricanes and storm surges is not going to help anybody in the end.’
      • ‘They would either have to let me go in the end and face doing time in jail if they were caught or they would have to kill me.’
      • ‘He rang the county clerk's office to sort out the error, and was able to vote in the end.’
      • ‘I struggle on a while longer, deciding in the end to leave this tough job to the experts.’
      • ‘Young men are like that, but it helps with the preservation of the species, in the end.’
      • ‘I know there will be a couple of grumbles along the way but, in the end, they would be happy.’
      • ‘The walls are now the wrong shade of white. this is the sort of thing which drives you mad in the end.’
      • ‘So, in the end, we gave her an old football, and she soon grew to love it like a special friend.’
      • ‘We shouldn't have had to go five times to the well, but we got our reward in the end.’
      eventually, in the end, in the long run, at length, finally, sooner or later, in time, in the fullness of time, after some time, in the final analysis, when all is said and done, one day, some day, sometime, at last, at long last
      View synonyms
  • keep (or hold) one's end up

    • informal Perform well in a difficult or competitive situation.

      ‘Michael had to keep his end up against attacks’
      • ‘The youngster held his end up in the tight exchanges and after scoring the first try he actually side-stepped a winger to score another in the second half.’
      • ‘It's hard for guys to step into a team and he's still naive when it comes to calls and knowing our players but he's held his end up competently.’
      • ‘The girls keep their end up but are really in a different league.’
      • ‘He held his end up gracefully, and even more kudos to him for being able to flirt in a foreign language.’
      • ‘You have to be able to keep your end up in an argument and show that your position is consistent.’
      • ‘This was a most enjoyable and rewarding experience and I think with the usual Kiwi exuberance we were able ‘to hold our end up’ quite well.’
      • ‘‘At least I'm prepared to consider the odd risk here and there,’ she argued, more to keep her end up than with any conviction.’
      • ‘I can certainly keep my end up in the school choir, which I love.’
      manage, survive, subsist, look after oneself, fend for oneself, shift for oneself, stand on one's own two feet, carry on, get through, get on, get along, get by, muddle through, muddle along, scrape by, bear up, make the grade, come through, hold one's own, keep one's end up, keep one's head above water, keep the wolf from the door, weather the storm
      View synonyms
  • make an end of

    • Cause (someone or something) to stop existing or die.

      ‘we regret that the printers did not make an end of half-paid female labour’
      • ‘Finally, we must reject supernatural explanations for the practical and simple reason that they make an end of science instead of advancing it.’
      • ‘One day the brothers who had been driven out came together, killed and devoured their father and so made an end of the patriarchal horde.’
      • ‘In the meantime, however, the time has come for us to make an end of him, and it is for that reason I requested you to visit me tonight.’
      • ‘The English spectators, respecting his determination to make an end of himself, stood politely by and let him drown.’
      • ‘As Daniel says - He has made an end of sin and finished transgression.’
      • ‘She answered, ‘I forgive you with all my heart, for I hope you shall make an end of my troubles.’’
      • ‘He did not want to see her suffer, and, thinking that it would be more merciful to make an end of her, he went into the kitchen to fetch his skinning knife.’
      • ‘The task which is posed by history is not to support one part of the imperialist system against another but to make an end of the system as a whole…’
  • make (both) ends meet

    • Earn just enough money to live on.

      ‘they were finding it hard to make ends meet’
      • ‘Liz and Nick were always out to work but they barely had enough money to make ends meet.’
      • ‘The reduction of overtime will also hit staff, many of whom are in debt and rely on the extra money to make ends meet.’
      • ‘Some want to make enough money to make ends meet; others want money for extras or just a way to stay busy.’
      • ‘As the majority of my salary was swallowed up by my obsession, I ended up borrowing a lot of money to make ends meet.’
      • ‘In the initial stages, the salary offered would not be enough to make both ends meet.’
      • ‘By doing some casual work, like designing computer software, he has managed to make both ends meet and has enough left over to invest in his bicycle journeys.’
      • ‘She said that £190 a week was simply not enough to make ends meet living in the capital.’
      • ‘They have been put up by people desperate to make some extra money in order to make ends meet.’
      • ‘This will lead to loss of trade to the shopkeepers who are all having a hard enough time to make ends meet as it is.’
      • ‘Life was hard, he said, but he managed to make ends meet.’
      manage, cope, get by, survive, exist, subsist, muddle along, muddle through, scrape along, scrape by, scrape through, get along, make do, barely have enough to live on, scarcely have enough to live on, keep the wolf from the door, keep one's head above water, scrimp, scrape a living
      View synonyms
  • never (or not) hear the end of

    • Be continually reminded of (an unpleasant topic or cause of annoyance)

      ‘a criminal court which admitted such a defence would never hear the end of it’
      • ‘When everyone else finds out I am pregnant I will never hear the end of it.’
      • ‘My goodness we didn't hear the end of that one for months.’
      • ‘I don't want to take the light away from her or else I'll never hear the end of it.’
      • ‘If everything I say is analysed to such an extent we'd never hear the end of it.’
      • ‘Man, don't tell anyone about that or I'll never hear the end of it.’
      • ‘Just let him play with us or you'll never hear the end of it!’
      • ‘I didn't hear the end of that one for a long, long time.’
      • ‘Don't use the word ‘rat’ as an uncomplimentary epithet around Jane, or you'll never hear the end of it.’
      • ‘‘You put a photo of him in the paper and we'll never hear the end of it,’ they warned.’
      • ‘If she knew you were doing this you'd never hear the end of it’
      • ‘You know this means we'll never hear the end of it from him.’
      • ‘I had a feeling I would never hear the end of this one.’
  • no end

    • informal To a great extent; very much.

      ‘this cheered me up no end’
      • ‘His daughters have come from abroad to see him and he has brightened up no end!’
      • ‘You know how it is when you suddenly become aware of some part of yourself, and it bothers you no end?’
      • ‘And I was shown a picture of the Other Half in knee socks, which cheered me up no end.’
      • ‘It pleased me no end, trying to make amends for many years of imposed suppression.’
      • ‘They showed remarkable fight on Sunday last, never gave up and this game will help them no end.’
      • ‘That cheers me up no end knowing that in four weeks the depression will melt away.’
      • ‘We're hoping to get a bit of gardening in tomorrow and, if so, the fresh air and gentle exercise will buck me up no end.’
      • ‘That cheered me up no end and the round of applause after that was mentioned went on for minutes!’
  • no end of

    • informal A great deal of.

      ‘emotions can cause no end of problems’
      • ‘It's expensive, it's unrewarding, and we'll get no end of criticism for doing what must be done.’
      • ‘This has caused no end of problems with the central government.’
      • ‘Michael provided us with no end of entertainment.’
      • ‘But it will have done no end of harm to his reputation.’
      • ‘She apparently suffers no end of teasing on account of it.’
      • ‘This has done no end of good for the studio's profitability.’
      • ‘It's a question with a long history and no end of long answers.’
      • ‘My current housemate has no end of casual tricks.’
      • ‘All this adds up to no end of bureaucracy and delay.’
      • ‘Election fever is gripping the area, with no end of opinion polls every day.’
      countless, innumerable, untold, legion, numberless, unnumbered, numerous, very many, manifold, multitudinous, multifarious
      View synonyms
  • on end

    • 1Continuing without stopping for a specified period of time.

      ‘sometimes they'll be gone for days on end’
      • ‘Sometimes their legs are tied together for years on end in the misguided hope that this will heal them.’
      • ‘It's just one of those silly rituals or in-jokes you tend to get when you have a group of men together on tour for weeks on end.’
      • ‘The Cochin Port Trust continued to maintain the steel structure for years on end.’
      • ‘Sonic would keep me occupied for hours on end.’
      in succession, in a row, at a time, successively, consecutively, running, straight, on end, one after the other, continuously, without a break, without interruption
      View synonyms
    • 2In an upright position.

      ‘he brushed his hair, leaving a tuft standing on end’
      • ‘The chord and respective melody movements are so genuinely perfect that they could make the hairs on your neck stand on end.’
      • ‘Linda's hair was messed up and Aaron's auburn hair was standing straight on end.’
      • ‘The other kind of trailer is the one that knocks your socks off, stands your hair on end, sears the retina and leaves you gasping.’
      • ‘The thought of spending thirty days in a glass tank with up to 2700 of them was enough to set my hair on end.’
      • ‘Suzanne's hair stood on end and her eyes bulged with a maniacal glee.’
      • ‘Oh, and needless to say, Ronnie Spector is a complete goddess whose voice can make the hairs on the back of one's neck stand on end.’
      • ‘If you are outside in a lightning storm, you may notice that your hair starts to stand on end.’
      upright, erect, perpendicular, plumb, straight, straight up and down, on end, standing, upstanding, bolt upright, upended
      View synonyms
  • put an end to

    • Cause (someone or something) to stop existing or die.

      ‘injury put an end to his career’
      ‘he decided to put an end to himself’
      • ‘Unfortunately, Hancock was too close to him to avoid a collision and he hit a wall, putting an end to his race before it had begun.’
      • ‘One judge finally puts an end to two disputed elections’
      • ‘He tried to freeze wages but the high court put an end to that the same day with a very quick ruling.’
      • ‘Amanda opened her mouth to say something but I put an end to that by throwing a salt shaker at her.’
      • ‘When an injury to her knee put an end to her dancing, Riefenstahl switched to skiing.’
      • ‘This will put an end to the agonising wait at the bus stop for the harried commuter.’
      • ‘A Government inspector has finally backed a controversial road scheme, putting an end to five years of debate and acrimonious protests.’
      • ‘But a new project, launched in Bexley in September, aims to put an end to all that.’
      • ‘This deal puts an end to three years of circus.’
      • ‘Predictably, the tree caught fire, putting an end to any more time-saving innovations.’
      • ‘They set up housekeeping in a vacant lot, but a farmer with his tractor soon puts an end to that.’
      • ‘And I want to be generation that puts an end to that.’
      destroy, kill, bring to an end, be the end of, end, extinguish, dash, quell, quash, ruin, wreck, shatter, smash, crush, scotch
      View synonyms
  • the sharp end

    • 1The most important or influential part of an activity or process.

      ‘he was born at the sharp end of history’
      • ‘Unlike any university-based course, the WPI programme exposed us to the sharp end of power, wealth, and social and political influences.’
      • ‘That's why it is so important that the people on the sharp end of these structural changes are given the opportunity to get their message through - loud and clear.’
      1. 1.1The most risky or unpleasant part of a system or activity.
        ‘businessmen are at the sharp end of the recession’
        • ‘The fundamental reason is that they are at the sharp end of the social effects of unemployment, job insecurity and low pay.’
        • ‘He was spot on when he said ‘Rough sleepers are at the sharp end of social exclusion.’’
        • ‘What the Executive now needs is to start developing the skills which would allow it to understand how demanding life is at the sharp end of public service delivery for teachers, doctors, police officers and others.’
        • ‘‘The guys on the street are at the sharp end of things,’ he says.’
        • ‘‘All local prisons are at the sharp end of overcrowding,’ the report points out.’
        • ‘But we cannot, in the process, join in the attacks on those very people who are at the sharp end of racist attacks.’
        • ‘One of the ugliest aspects of the risk aversion culture is the way we name and blame the beleaguered professionals who are at the sharp end of our failed policies.’
        • ‘State social work is at the sharp end of the welfare state.’
    • 2The bow of a ship.

  • a —— to end all ——s

    • informal Used to emphasize how impressive or successful something is of its kind.

      ‘she is going to throw a party to end all parties’
  • without end

    • Without a limit or boundary.

      ‘a war without end’
      • ‘Sadly, the Fire Brigades Union seem to have talked, and walked, themselves into a series of strikes without end.’
      • ‘We will be marching and attending rallies without end unless there is a significant and profound change in American life and policy.’
      • ‘No other land is in sight, only an ocean without end.’
      • ‘The appalling realities seem to continue without end.’
      • ‘There is noise, disturbance, pollution, and traffic without end - a habitat that only Homo sapiens can endure.’
      • ‘But work without end spells less time for study.’
      • ‘But war without end is not a policy; it's asking for trouble.’
      • ‘In the context of ‘a war on terrorism,’ which is a war without end, there is no enemy combatant per se, and it makes everything even heavier.’
      • ‘It has three times reduced taxes - mostly on the rich - careening the federal budget from a surplus to a deficit without end.’
      • ‘And to find it, you need love and courage without end.’
      • ‘The words it spoke were without beginning and without end, an eternal toll.’
      unlimited, limitless, infinite, inexhaustible, boundless, unbounded, untold, immeasurable, measureless, incalculable, inestimable
      continuous, unbroken, uninterrupted, never-ending, without end, non-stop
      View synonyms
  • world without end

    • Forever or infinitely.

      ‘the long summer days stretched ahead, world without end’
      • ‘Joyce's revision of Dublin in 1904 becomes a vision of world without end.’
      • ‘He was who he was, and she was who she was, and this was where they were, world without end, amen.’
      • ‘Our knowledge of the riches of the glory of God will increase forever and ever, world without end.’
      • ‘In fact, most people who finish are those who learn to get up at 7: 00 AM every morning and write until 10 PM - day after day after day after day, world without end, amen.’
      • ‘As Paul the apostle says in Ephesians 3: 21, ‘unto Him be glory in the church by Christ Jesus throughout all ages, world without end.’’
      • ‘We all remember the Dead Boys, the Germs, the Damned, the Clash, Television, etcetera and so on world without end.’

Origin

Old English ende (noun), endian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch einde (noun), einden (verb) and German Ende (noun), enden (verb).

Pronunciation

end

/ɛnd/