Definition of eminence in English:

eminence

noun

  • 1mass noun Fame or acknowledged superiority within a particular sphere.

    ‘her eminence in cinematography’
    • ‘The Edinburgh operation is in a very healthy situation, we are encountering very significant growth, and we can build on our core talents to operate from a position of eminence and strength in these competitive markets.’
    • ‘Some authors have been surprised that their eminence hasn't protected them from a mauling at the hands of ‘the mad, the bad, and the misinformed.’’
    • ‘And when eventually he realised the nature of the complaint, his defence fell back on the eminence of the good Sir Richard.’
    • ‘There are certain men and women who by reason of their genius, eminence, achievement, or idiosyncrasy seem to exercise a sort of magnetism on biographers and publishers.’
    • ‘Early nationalists in search of martial heroes raised him to the eminence of a ‘freedom fighter‘.’
    • ‘For eighteenth-century Europeans that was still the case, but, for west European intellectuals at least, Europe enjoyed an eminence over the rest of the world for secular reasons as well.’
    • ‘This is especially so if the expert is a man of great eminence and therefore likely to be respected, effective and persuasive.’
    • ‘‘I feel absolutely delighted but very humbled to have been included in this roster of eminence,’ she said.’
    • ‘Among the many ways Britain has been different from the continent has been not only the number but the eminence of female Sovereigns.’
    • ‘The honorary position is seen as a reward for professional eminence in the field.’
    • ‘While retaining strong connections with his roots, he progressed inexorably from unexceptional beginnings to a position of some eminence in Vienna.’
    • ‘Salieri, who has risen from humble origins to his position of eminence through sheer hard work, is a deeply devout man.’
    • ‘James, by contrast, has risen to a heady eminence which serves to further emphasize the humiliation of his sibling.’
    • ‘To achieve such eminence, there are doubtless various devices and elements in a novel which are more or less compulsory: crime fiction has to have a crime, for example.’
    • ‘He cites the eminence and experience of the writers, showing that they are not mere hacks but people with a reputation to maintain.’
    • ‘She is also renowned for the eminence of her contacts.’
    • ‘From modest roots, his rise to eminence was all the more remarkable.’
    illustriousness, distinction, renown, pre-eminence, notability, greatness, calibre, prestige, importance, reputation, repute, note
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun An important or distinguished person.
      ‘the Lord Chancellor canvassed the views of various legal eminences’
      • ‘The male cheerleader was something of a campus eminence, regarded as an up-and-coming entrepreneur and future captain of industry.’
      • ‘Margaret Atwood is one of the eminences of Canadian literature.’
      • ‘This was the perfect voice to carry pop culture through the mid-60s, till things went tragic and the Beatles turned into eminences cloistered enough to be their own parodies.’
      • ‘These were serious times, with the governing taste set by eminences from abroad.’
      • ‘The great railway barons, corrupt legislators, and assorted judicial eminences who made the legal history of American railroads are given only the most scant personal attention.’
      • ‘Generations of very clever Foreign Office eminences have devoted their meagre resources to just one futile aim - punching above our weight on the world stage.’
      • ‘Look at eminences in the past, and what stands out in their childhoods is an animus toward school, a tolerance for solitude and families with lots of books.’
      • ‘This point was driven home a few weeks later when, at a dinner for scientific eminences, a colleague introduced me to one of the nation's leading neuroscientists.’
      • ‘I came to suspect that my obit-writing guaranteed these eminences something like eternal life.’
      • ‘The 44 eminences charge that Britain's apparent lack of transparency and accountability threatens to undermine whatever moral high ground there is left.’
      • ‘Will there be letters from eminences and celebs to bring glitter to the letters page?’
      • ‘No wonder two film eminences have been trying to bring the lady's life to the screen.’
      • ‘Intellectual life was not so dissimilar, vitality after the war coming largely from external sources, émigrés from Central and Eastern Europe, with few local eminences.’
      important person, influential person, distinguished person, dignitary, luminary, worthy, grandee, notable, notability, personage, leading light, vip
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2His/Your Eminence A title or form of address given to a Roman Catholic cardinal.
      ‘His Eminence, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’
      • ‘Would Your Eminence be so magnanimous as to enlighten your most loyal servant to the identities?’
      • ‘As a peace offering, Liam gave the priest a small bottle of whisky for free, ‘just in case His Eminence might fancy something a bit stronger in the morning.’’
      • ‘The parade will be reviewed from the steps of Saint Patrick's Cathedral by His Eminence Cardinal Edward Eagan, Archbishop of New York.’
      • ‘‘In the courtyard, Your Eminence,’ replied Cygnatus, extending his arm toward the atrium.’
      • ‘The Church was dedicated to Our Lady of the Rosary on 3 October 1875 by His Eminence Paul Cardinal Cullen, Archbishop of Dublin…’
      • ‘So the Community is particularly touched this evening by the visit of His Eminence, Cardinal Rodriguez and the topic of the Lecture, ‘Signs of Hope’.’
      • ‘The blind must not lead the blind, Your Eminence.’
      • ‘I beg your forgiveness, Your Eminence, but we don't have any boards and considering the depth of the pit the wood will surely break.’
      • ‘And when mourners of every age, race, and creed praised him as a great man, I wondered what His Eminence had done to merit those words.’
      • ‘I curtsied low and said, ‘Good evening, Your Eminence.’’
  • 2literary, formal A piece of rising ground.

    ‘an eminence commanding the River Emme’
    • ‘Join us for five days of hiking around Uncompahgre and Wetterhorn Peaks, complete with deep valleys, rocky eminences, alpine tundra, and towering mountains.’
    • ‘We have some gently rounded, wooded, eminences.’
    • ‘The two gentlemen enjoy a philosophic view of the early morning landscape from a neighbouring eminence, Mazard Hill.’
    • ‘By the standards of most of England, East Anglia is a low-lying and relatively flat region, but there is in fact much variability in topography and even low hills form clear local eminences.’
    • ‘I thought we were never going to reach it; and then, almost unexpectedly, we suddenly came upon it - a small but ancient village, rising up on a slight eminence, but concealed from view by big clumps of tall-growing reeds.’
    • ‘But the most impressive structures along what became the A40 were the three big monumental brick blocks rising on the north side on an eminence at Park Royal.’
    • ‘Upriver loomed the rocky eminence of Nephin Mountain.’
    • ‘A striking iceberg that I had seen photos of before had two foothill eminences joined at the top by a soaring St. Louis Gateway Arch of ice.’
    • ‘The edifice… is built upon a beautiful eminence, on the Philadelphia road, affording on all sides, an extensive, and delightful view, with charming rural scenery, on every side.’
    • ‘The Armory was described by one British visitor as ‘beautifully situated on an eminence overlooking the town.’’
    • ‘There was in fact a splendid view of the mine from the eminence of the hill, even better than the one from Fred and Peggy's bungalow.’
    elevation, rise, raised ground, rising ground, height, hill, bank, mound
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Anatomy A slight projection from the surface of the body.
      ‘a swelling on the lower surface of the brain termed the median eminence’
      • ‘Note the relationship between the intercondylar eminence and the posterior cruciate ligament.’
      • ‘They are separated by an upward projection called the intercondylar eminence.’
      • ‘Shaking the patient's hand at the end of the consultation, the doctor noticed a raised lesion on the thenar eminence of his right hand.’
      • ‘The examiner's thumbs are placed on either side of the bony eminences of the tunnel (the scaphoid on one side and the pisiform and hamate on the other.)’
      • ‘Before reaching the anterior margin, there is a low eminence on the paracristid crest and an expansion of its lingual surface, these features marking the position of the paraconid.’
      • ‘Therefore, all bony structures of the face, including the malar eminences, orbital rims, zygomatic arches, mandible, and teeth, should be carefully inspected and palpated for irregularity or tenderness.’
      • ‘The articular eminence of the glenoid fossa is rectangular and broad transversely.’
      • ‘An accessory spine behind the ileopectineal eminence occasionally provides an attachment site for the psoas minor muscle.’
      • ‘The neurohypophysis proper comprises the median eminence of the tuber cinereum, the infundibulum, the pituitary stalk, and the posterior or neural lobe of the pituitary gland.’
      • ‘The origin of the tibial coordinate system was selected as the point midway between the tibial eminences on the proximal end of the tibia.’

Origin

Middle English: from Latin eminentia, from eminere ‘jut, project’.

Pronunciation

eminence

/ˈɛmɪnəns/