Definition of emancipation in English:



mass noun
  • 1The fact or process of being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions; liberation.

    ‘the social and political emancipation of women’
    • ‘They also offer joyous, kidlike emancipation from the lonely work of conditioning.’
    • ‘At a different scale, we may invoke female emancipation to explain the declining populations of Europe.’
    • ‘It is certain that for him, emancipation is no part of a reform program of the church for society.’
    • ‘Learning how to serve had begun to yield to women's changing aspirations and increasing economic emancipation.’
    • ‘To the proletariat the imperial suffrage has been a mighty weapon in its battle for emancipation.’
    • ‘Marx pointed out that political emancipation was a different thing from universal human emancipation.’
    • ‘He wanted to push for rights for his people and ultimately called for Catholic emancipation.’
    • ‘Religion is meant for the emancipation of living beings.’
    • ‘This state of emancipation is a state beyond mind and matter, where both sensation and perception cease.’
    • ‘The old ideas, in the old organisations, represented quite the opposite of social emancipation.’
    • ‘In their emancipation lies the wellbeing of the world.’
    • ‘He was really fighting for national emancipation.’
    • ‘Big Maggie heralds a new emancipation in Irish society.’
    • ‘Perhaps the bicycle's most important legacy is its effect upon some women's emancipation.’
    • ‘In the person of our heroine we are presented with a plea for emancipation.’
    • ‘One could even say the story implies that emancipation is not properly a woman's pursuit or destiny.’
    • ‘It is a question of cooperating with the oppressed and supporting their emancipation.’
    • ‘Actually the majority of the essay regards the question of women's emancipation.’
    • ‘It has not yet raised the inspiring banner of working class emancipation.’
    • ‘Emancipation enormously raised the stature of the Union cause internationally.’
    freeing, liberation, liberating, setting free, release, releasing, letting loose, letting out, setting loose, discharge
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The freeing of someone from slavery.
      ‘the early struggle for emancipation from slavery’
      • ‘Emancipation was supposed to have settled all that over 150 years ago.’
      • ‘Retelling the myth of emancipation from slavery impels you to reclaim the story of your wider self.’
      • ‘He went into that Alliance and there denounced the only true friends of emancipation - the abolitionists.’
      • ‘Emancipation in fact did little in the short run to change the structure of Russian society.’
      • ‘This history of struggle did not end with the emancipation of the slaves.’
      • ‘Some say the serfs were better before emancipation; some say things became better after emancipation.’
      • ‘The emancipation of the serfs in 1861 left the countryside in deep poverty.’
      • ‘The country squires were firmly opposed to emancipation.’
      • ‘The emancipation of the slaves was fought for and won by the slaves themselves.’
      • ‘The truth is that the emancipation of the slaves was a parliamentary reform, the act of the nation and not of its rulers.’
      • ‘McClellan made no secret of his opposition to emancipation.’
      • ‘Following emancipation, we are able to feel with Elisabeth what it must have been like to suddenly have a surname.’
      • ‘Some deal with war or politics, some deal with the bittersweet issues surrounding emancipation.’
      • ‘Our subject, of course, was how to represent the story of slavery from the slave trade to emancipation in six hours.’
      • ‘Fairclough chronicles the circumstances in which Southern black educators worked from emancipation to the 1970s.’
      • ‘Emancipation is the event most associated with Lincoln next to the preservation of the Union.’
      • ‘Disgust at this treatment of Africans led to demands for emancipation of the slaves and the abolition of the slave trade in the 19th century.’
      • ‘Freedom was preferable to slavery, and African Americans had gained benefits from emancipation.’
      • ‘But the ultimate example of Lincoln's constitutional scruples was emancipation.’
      • ‘He insists that emancipation was perhaps the single most significant act ever carried out by a US president.’