Definition of elitist in English:

elitist

adjective

  • 1Relating to or supporting the view that a society or system should be led by an elite.

    ‘older men with an elitist attitude about music’
    ‘the image of polo as an elitist sport’
    • ‘Western as well as Eastern cultures are deeply elitist.’
    • ‘Is his doctrine too precious and elitist to be of real use?’
    • ‘Nineteenth century liberalism, with its emphasis on equality before the law, was therefore elitist and conservative.’
    • ‘Make no mistake, the Democrats are guilty as well, they are often elitist and paternalistic.’
    • ‘Indeed, there are schools in other regions which are openly elitist.’
    • ‘To do this we now turn to an approach based on contrasting views according to which modern democracies can be either elitist or pluralist.’
    • ‘There are some experiments, but universities in many of these countries are very elitist.’
    • ‘The irony is that the official programme is not particularly elitist, either in terms of classical art forms or cutting-edge postmodernism.’
    • ‘The labor history in this book will be as institutional and elitist as the rest of it.’
    • ‘However some see his group, founded in Madrid in 1928, as secretive and elitist.’
    1. 1.1 Demonstrating a superior attitude or behaviour associated with an elite.
      ‘some that say he is a spoiled, elitist snob’
      • ‘Despite the obvious appeal such elitist and exclusionary tactics lend to the club, it's sort of a shame.’
      • ‘They are at war with a liberal, elitist mainstream press.’
      • ‘The organization has again managed to avoid allowing transparency and accountability into its secret and elitist decision-making.’
      • ‘You may want to think of the fair as like an elitist high-society dinner party where certain guests don't want to be seated next to certain other guests.’
      • ‘And if you think those situations are completely unrelated to that discussion … then you're just living in your own closed, elitist fantasy world.’
      • ‘At the core of the crisis is the fact that many of our doctors are out of touch and elitist.’
      • ‘Fundamentalism is far more elitist and extortionist than we can imagine.’
      • ‘There was a time when success was considered elitist and mediocrity was the norm.’
      • ‘But not everyone is in love with hip-hop, or the elitist, only-cool-when-nobody-likes-you sensibilities of garage rock.’
      • ‘Many individuals, members of Congress, political leaders, and the news media showed its true racist and elitist nature.’

noun

  • A person who believes that a society or system should be led by an elite.

    ‘critics portray him as an out-of-touch elitist’
    • ‘He remains an elitist, a technocrat, a bourgeois.’
    • ‘You're a man of the people and I'm a snob and an elitist.’
    • ‘One spin of this DVD will make believers out of skeptics; music elitists be damned.’
    • ‘The basic charge is that these men, critics of capitalism, were racists and elitists.’
    • ‘Forget what the guilty rich elitists are selling you to keep you voting in their corner, and make up your own mind.’
    • ‘Despite the best intentions of nerds and elitists everywhere, such is the state of the popular music industry.’
    • ‘Thus he was labelled an elitist and his invitation to appear on Oprah's show was withdrawn.’
    • ‘He had become a jazz elitist who played with the best and demanded the best in himself.’
    • ‘Then again, perhaps we were just a bunch of chardonnay-swilling elitists totally out of touch with middle Australia.’
    • ‘The old snobberies of rock purists and classical elitists make less and less sense now.’

Pronunciation

elitist

/ɪˈliːtɪst/