Definition of election in English:

election

noun

  • 1A formal and organized choice by vote of a person for a political office or other position.

    ‘the 2008 local council elections’
    mass noun ‘he agreed to stand for election’
    • ‘They will be needed if anti-fascists are to dent the Nazi vote in the June elections.’
    • ‘The far left has failed to fully build on its vote in the presidential elections.’
    • ‘This year's presidential election looks to be even tighter; that should give rural voters the deciding voice in who wins.’
    • ‘Two thirds of the electorate in Hackney did not vote in the council elections this year.’
    • ‘The police chief is trying to keep his nose clean for the upcoming elections.’
    • ‘Its task was to frighten people at elections so that they voted for the Fascists.’
    • ‘When the party won a landslide election in 1984, the country was ready for reform.’
    • ‘He won last year's election campaigning on values: border protection, national security, and social order.’
    • ‘We are prepared to have one person, one vote elections and to give up our absolute power.’
    • ‘Ballot boxes will be left to gather dust in the June elections, as every vote will be cast by post.’
    • ‘Later on, there is an emphatic call for people to vote in the scheduled elections.’
    • ‘In the recent mayoral election in London, there was a small turnout of voters.’
    • ‘One measure of the outcome is the declining number of people who vote in elections.’
    • ‘They have taken out a group of people who are no longer in a position to disrupt the elections.’
    • ‘The party has been unable to make substantial gains in rural seats in western Canada in recent elections.’
    • ‘With a federal election looming, a new organisation says they are tackling the heart of youth voter apathy.’
    • ‘A solution has to be found to increase the numbers of people voting at elections at all levels.’
    • ‘After staging a vigorous media campaign, the opposition coalition wins the parliamentary elections.’
    • ‘What you vote for in elections is not more freedom and more democracy but more politicians.’
    • ‘The hope is that people will then feel secure enough to vote in the forthcoming elections.’
    ballot, vote, poll, referendum, plebiscite, general election, local election, popular vote, straw poll, straw vote, show of hands
    voting, voting in, choosing, picking, selection, choice, appointment
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1mass noun The action of electing or the fact of being elected.
      ‘his election to the House of Representatives’
      • ‘The fact that he was an unprincipled liar whose election was bought with Mafia help counted for nothing.’
      • ‘She is the first member of a party other than the Labour Party to win election to the postal executive.’
      • ‘Eligibility to stand for election to the Council is determined by the Council of Guardians.’
      • ‘Two are now seeking election to the board in what can only be a reflection of continuing unrest.’
      • ‘County councillors are members of the public who stand for election to serve the people of Essex.’
      • ‘This and his election to a praetorship for 62 established him as a man of power and importance.’
      • ‘From this platform he launched his campaign for election to the Lower House in 1958.’
      • ‘Among the honours which Mansion received was election to the Royal Academy of Belgium.’
      • ‘Congratulations to Peterhead and Elgin City on their election to the Scottish League.’
      • ‘He continued as a paid consultant to the company long after his election to the Dail in 1997.’
      • ‘His housemate was Campaigns Officer when I first stood for election to the council.’
      • ‘That same year he gained election to a fellowship at St John's College, Cambridge.’
      • ‘We mention now just a few of the topics he studied after his election to the Academy.’
      • ‘He said he was excited about the prospect of standing for election to the House of Commons.’
      • ‘In fact, more to the point, why stand for election to something you only want to destroy?’
      • ‘His memoir won the prize which in turn was the main reason for his election to the Academy.’
      • ‘All clergy who hoped for election to a benefice in the new constitutional Church had to take it.’
      • ‘Much has been made of Martin's election to a post which is not normally decided along partly lines.’
      • ‘Among his many foreign honours was election to the Académie des Sciences of Paris.’

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin electio(n-), from eligere ‘pick out’ (see elect).

Pronunciation

election

/ɪˈlɛkʃ(ə)n/