Definition of elation in English:

elation

noun

mass noun
  • Great happiness and exhilaration.

    ‘Richard's elation at regaining his health was short-lived’
    • ‘It took me two months to work up the courage to ask her out and the relief and elation when she said yes was immeasurable.’
    • ‘My periods of distress and elation and my innumerable naps follow the pattern of jet lag, except I'm at home.’
    • ‘There will be fab bands and, as stated, elation that has never before been felt.’
    • ‘As we made our way to the car, our feeling of elation quickly fizzled.’
    • ‘However, that elation has been mixed with some sadness as well.’
    • ‘The feeling of elation and relief after completing the course was indescribable.’
    • ‘And together the group experienced elation and exhaustion as they slogged through stunning terrain.’
    • ‘Her temporary relief and elation was immediately washed away when she lifted her head again and looked around.’
    • ‘The effort and commitment meant the result offered accomplishment rather than elation.’
    • ‘The trek entails moments of extreme discomfort as well as overwhelming joy and elation.’
    • ‘Laughter is a gift from the divine. It is the divine expressing joy and elation through us.’
    • ‘Couldn't it be an illusion of people gone astray in elation and ecstasy?’
    • ‘I never knew it was possible to feel both elation and dread at the same time.’
    • ‘My surge of elation was fleeting; I knew it was too good to be true.’
    • ‘Mood may be labile, shifting from depression to euphoria or elation to fear and panic.’
    • ‘We caught the shuttle back to Heathrow, and arrived back with our heads still dizzy with emotion, a mixture of elation and relief.’
    • ‘You feel everything from a nervousness bordering on paranoia to relief and - hopefully - elation.’
    • ‘Taking off to places unknown, with your motorcycle for company and a feeling of elation can be a great experience.’
    • ‘Eventually the finish line draws into view and it is at an end: a complex surge of relief and elation floods the veins.’
    • ‘Misery gave way to elation, however, when spears of sunlight rent the clouds, gilding the watery flatlands of Lewis.’
    happiness, exhilaration, joy, joyousness, delight, glee
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French elacion, from Latin elat- ‘raised’, from the verb efferre (see elate).

Pronunciation

elation

/ɪˈleɪʃ(ə)n/