Definition of Edwardian in English:

Edwardian

adjective

  • Relating to or characteristic of the reign of King Edward VII.

    ‘the Edwardian era’
    ‘a fine Edwardian house’
    • ‘The appearance of barbed wire, machine guns and trenches on the battlefields of the Boer War had made several Edwardian thinkers aware of the case for some sort of armoured land ship.’
    • ‘Most of the poems and stories Bloom selects are from the Romantic, Victorian, and Edwardian eras.’
    • ‘I once interviewed UK antiques expert Mark Franks, who is collecting cigarette cases and Edwardian desks to pay for his retirement.’
    • ‘Victorian and Edwardian influences abound on today's estates, which are full of brick-built homes with bay windows under pitched roofs.’
    • ‘The use of toys and tricks characteristic of an Edwardian nursery is another of many contributory strokes of imaginative genius; they not only fit the story perfectly, but double the potency of its telling.’
    • ‘Instead, the investigator turned out to be a grave young man attired in a three-piece suit with Edwardian collar and gold watch fob.’
    • ‘Elizabeth's Edwardian childhood was privileged and secure, a world dominated by nurserymaids and governesses, but two dates had fixed points in the firmament of her life.’
    • ‘Decorative tile manufacture reached its peak during the Victorian and Edwardian eras.’
    • ‘During the late-Victorian and Edwardian era British clerks were under considerable strain to construct a positive masculine identity and experience.’
    • ‘There'll be an afternoon festival of local music in the Edwardian setting of Bantock House and Park, Wolverhampton.’
    • ‘The York racecourse committee has also loaned Imagine York some excellent pictures of Edwardian racegoers enjoying a day out at Knavesmire.’
    • ‘A controversial plan to demolish an Edwardian house and replace it with flats has been approved by Bradford Council, despite a flood of objections from residents.’
    • ‘The controversy has attracted the interest of the Victorian Society which seeks to preserve Victorian and Edwardian architecture.’
    • ‘As for the new and currently practising writers of Edwardian times, those of the first decade of the century were distinguished for their prose rather than their prosody.’
    • ‘All have been individually decorated in a tasteful, graceful Georgian and Edwardian style - an atmosphere enhanced by the decanter of sherry waiting for you on arrival.’
    • ‘Built in 1910, this Edwardian house has been completely restored in recent years by its present owners and retains numerous original features.’
    • ‘Angry East Sheen residents determined to prevent the demolition of an Edwardian house were left reeling this week after amendments were made to a planning application on the site.’
    • ‘He was susceptible to her cosiness, appreciated her sense of humour and shared her weakness for the company of artists and Edwardian comfort.’
    • ‘Most people's concept of an ideal house still has much more to do with Edwardian design standards than environmental concerns.’
    • ‘Charleville Square is a modern development of Edwardian style houses off Butterfield Avenue in Rathfarnham, around four miles from the city centre.’

noun

  • A person who lived during the Edwardian period.

    • ‘These are some of the questions that exercise historians: they also exercised the Edwardians.’
    • ‘The Edwardians turned out for some curious entertainments.’
    • ‘In writing about the Edwardians, he eschews the conventional attitude which sees the 20th-century 'noughties' as a period of languorous weekends on the estates of the bloated plutocrats with whom Edward VII surrounded himself.’
    • ‘The Edwardians were no slackers when it came to enjoyment and in their heyday the grand Bohemian resorts of Marienbad and Carlsbad read like a roll call of honour for the great and glorious of the day.’
    • ‘I was a penniless student trying to tour the Greek mainland with the help of Pausanias, a Roman travel writer who lived nearly 2,000 years ago and was to Imperial Rome what Baedecker was to the Edwardians.’

Pronunciation

Edwardian

/ɛdˈwɔːdɪən/