Definition of edit in English:

edit

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Prepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it.

    ‘Volume I was edited by J. Johnson’
    • ‘The excerpts have been edited lightly for clarification.’
    • ‘The published first-hand accounts of veterans are edited for one purpose or another.’
    • ‘These letters have been edited for clarity and space.’
    • ‘And what must he or she have thought when they were editing this stuff?’
    • ‘All have been carefully edited with helpful introductions, notes, reading lists and useful chronologies.’
    • ‘The work on editing the typescript in preparation for publication continues.’
    • ‘Even children's textbooks are edited to remove politically incorrect references.’
    • ‘At the moment I may not be too good at pumping out new material but I seem to find critiquing and editing old stuff okay.’
    • ‘After all, journalists, not proprietors, actually write and edit these papers.’
    • ‘He knows that the critical letters will be carefully edited for length.’
    • ‘Deborah is also editing an anthology regarding heterosexuality for Pluto Press.’
    • ‘And so it is quite disappointing that this volume was very poorly edited.’
    • ‘Feel free to use and edit the stuff I write, please.’
    • ‘Letters for publication must be signed and may be edited for space and clarity.’
    • ‘If you're some kind of a writer you might come back to them at intervals in search of material, or to edit them for publication.’
    correct, check, copy-edit
    select, choose, assemble, organize, put together, arrange, rearrange
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    1. 1.1 Choose material for (a film or radio or television programme) and arrange it to form a coherent whole.
      ‘edited highlights of the match’
      • ‘Then, the footage is carefully edited together and burned as a lesson to all concerned.’
      • ‘Premiere is a powerhouse of tools for editing your video giving you the equivalent of a studio full of traditional equipment only a few years ago.’
      • ‘The maker said it had edited the programme according to its time slot and had not allowed school-age children to be featured.’
      • ‘Hundreds of hours of raw footage were edited down to 90 minutes by the U.S. film makers.’
      • ‘I heard that he edited the film and showed it somewhere, but the footage is gone, and not in my hands anymore.’
      • ‘There's plenty of power on tap - enough to edit family videos - and most of the software you are likely to need is gratis.’
      • ‘Theoretically, it is possible to shoot and edit a whole programme, in a matter of 2 days, for less than £1,000.’
      • ‘When he started in TV news, crews edited news reports on film stock, prompting fewer edits and a slower visual pace.’
      • ‘The one-hour debate (with ads and news breaks) was severely edited for the purposes of the documentary.’
      • ‘Equally, cinema documentaries may have to be edited down for television.’
      • ‘And that telephone conversation was edited down to a few minutes in the film, but it was close to an hour and a half long.’
      • ‘It gives you the opportunity to edit together your own version of three scenes.’
      • ‘In some ways it almost feels like a much longer documentary designed for television that has been edited down for the cinema.’
      • ‘They worked hard over the weekend and filmed some great material from which to edit the forthcoming video.’
      • ‘Surely the one advantage of this being on tape is they could edit this stuff down?’
      • ‘Two years in the Serengeti and 600 hours of footage later, Downer and his team had to edit a film which matched Nye's script.’
      • ‘We then put it in, as I was editing the film, so that as it was going together, we were laying the score and trying it out.’
      • ‘Consequently, the snuff auteur edited the film to hide his identity.’
      • ‘Some 200 hours of footage have been edited down to the less than two hours that make up the completed film.’
      • ‘We know that he did work on the editing a long time, partly because he hadn't edited digital video before.’
      select, choose, assemble, organize, put together, arrange, rearrange
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    2. 1.2 Change (text) on a computer.
      • ‘Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit web page content using any Web browser.’
      • ‘To make this value unchangeable, simply edit the file as shown.’
      • ‘Although it uses an XML language format, the code will be pretty familiar to anyone who has worked with HTML to edit web pages.’
      • ‘Over the years I've used all kinds of software but a lot of the time I use my computer to edit text.’
      • ‘That's fine for display purposes, but if the file is edited and sent back to a PC, the original font selections are lost.’
      • ‘And because it's vector-based, designers can manipulate it without losing the ability to edit the text.’
      • ‘The software tracks who has edited a particular document and what changes were made.’
      • ‘Then I had to edit the text that showed up under the logo in the file boot.msg.’
      • ‘However, editing a file that uses entities in this way is tedious and difficult at best.’
      • ‘Finally, if you're done editing this file and want to see the first error in the next file use the: cnf command.’
      • ‘Techniques for editing the text displayed by a computer program are disclosed.’
      • ‘I'd rather not have to edit the history file manually, which seems to be the only way I know to cover my tracks.’
      • ‘There's no sense in trying to write / edit your text online, on a slow, timed connection.’
      • ‘Administrative interfaces are available to edit records.’
      amend, emend, correct, alter, change, adapt, copy-edit, rewrite, redraft, rescript, recast, rephrase, rework, update, revamp
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    3. 1.3edit something out Remove unnecessary or inappropriate material from a text, film, or radio or television programme.
      ‘the film's sexually explicit scenes have been edited out’
      • ‘Those Big Brother tactics were edited out of the official White House transcript.’
      • ‘He edited this remark out of the printed version of his comments, because he had found that people tended to recall his playful statements more readily than his serious ones.’
      • ‘Nah, someone would have edited it out after seeing a rough cut, wouldn't they?’
      • ‘However, when someone states something totally and obviously false as a matter of fact, it is up to the paper to either edit the error out, or provide the correct information.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, he said it in a show that was heavily scripted and not something that NBC was prepared for, but I regret that NBC edited it out on the West Coast.’
      • ‘In the end, this chapter will be edited out of the book, but you or I, or whoever writes it will have a lot of stimulating conversations that may very well unearth other directions for discussion.’
      • ‘The author apparently felt that this scene was too horrific and graphic to present to the audience, so he shrewdly decided to edit them out.’
      • ‘The best part is that all the waiting has been edited out, and we just get the good bits.’
      • ‘He also told his staff to make sure those jokes were edited out of those shows if and when they were rerun.’
      • ‘She played the unedited versions of songs - insisting that the meaning was changed when words were edited out.’
      • ‘I'd had to edit some bits out to make it more concise.’
      • ‘The song almost made it into the film but Disney, who monitored every stage of the three-year production process, decided it was too long and edited it out.’
      • ‘He seems to produce them without prior planning, and there is no effort to edit them out.’
      • ‘A piano tinkles somewhere in the back of the room and a loud cough interrupts one song: no-one had yet devised the means to edit it out.’
      • ‘And so it was edited out and it was actually changed to three times a week!’
      • ‘As a consequence that sequence was edited out in some parts of the country.’
      • ‘We'll assume that Brad answered that question but the explanation was edited out for space in the final edition.’
      • ‘It's clear that a great deal was edited out of Soderbergh's final cut, and, while the absence of this material doesn't render the storyline incoherent, there are occasions when the narrative becomes choppy.’
      • ‘Most of the positive stuff has been edited out for effect, but the message is both clear and encouraging.’
      • ‘Not only are they demanding an apology, the dissidents have also asked for the BBC's assurance that certain scenes will be edited out before the show is sold abroad.’
      delete, cross out, cross through, strike out, score out, scratch out, cancel, put a line through, blue-pencil, ink out, edit out, blank out
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  • 2Be editor of (a newspaper or magazine)

    ‘he began to edit the magazine in 1923’
    • ‘He has edited the programme for more than 30 years, but if anybody can do it, it is him.’
    • ‘He edited that newspaper from 1913 until his death in 1917.’
    • ‘She edited the school newspaper and was a class president.’
    • ‘Nelson was a graduate of Indiana University, where he edited the student newspaper when Ernie Pyle was one of the writers.’
    • ‘He was a writer, philosopher and political activist, and edited several newspapers and magazines.’
    • ‘He edits a newspaper that has won so many national and state journalism awards that he displays only the first-place plaques.’
    • ‘Yet, she managed to edit a community newspaper in Chennai for a brief period.’
    • ‘As an information specialist, he edited a military newspaper, the Southern Cross.’
    • ‘I edited a weekly newspaper in New Orleans and then did some freelancing for Deneuve Magazine.’
    • ‘If you're suddenly editing a newspaper, it's probably not at all what you thought it was going to be like when you were a writer.’
    • ‘He edited newspapers and participated in numerous reform movements.’
    • ‘He also edited a local newspaper and was a prominent member of the al-Dawa party, which nominally opposes the occupation and calls for Iraq to become an Islamic state.’
    • ‘In 1838 he founded and briefly edited a newspaper, The Long Islander.’
    • ‘I'm willing to bet she edited the college newspaper.’
    • ‘I edit a call-in programme for BBC Radio Leeds which today will be looking at whether its ever right to lie.’
    • ‘He became a university lecturer, and from 1957 edited The Africanist newspaper.’
    • ‘However, not much is known about the life, times and journalistic career of the legendary poet who had edited several newspapers during the freedom struggle.’
    • ‘For a time wen I was younger, I even edited a fanzine, though this was later abandoned in favour of getting more involved and writing for other people's fanzines.’
    • ‘While at Bucknell University, he edited the conservative newspaper, the Sentinel.’
    • ‘Kennedy becomes the first woman to edit a national newspaper in Ireland and only the fourth editor of the Irish Times in 40 years.’
    be the editor of, control the content of, control, direct, run, manage, be in charge of, be responsible for, be at the helm of, be chief of, head, lead, supervise, superintend, oversee, preside over, be the boss of
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noun

  • 1A change or correction made as a result of editing.

    ‘the system has no word wrap feature—so even small edits involved extensive rekeying’
    • ‘These consist of scenes that have small edits in them, either a few words of dialogue or a joke that was eventually cut from the final film.’
    • ‘When he started in TV news, crews edited news reports on film stock, prompting fewer edits and a slower visual pace.’
    • ‘It makes sense only in tiny individual edits - exactly like every other dimwitted action spectacular.’
    • ‘But don't hold these cinematically essential edits against the genre.’
    • ‘Miramax, initially intending to release the movie to compete for the 2002 Oscars, shelved the picture at the last minute after deciding that re-shoots and edits were needed to get it into shape.’
    • ‘After they painstakingly restored the film to its 222 minute glory, David Lean wanted to make a few edits.’
    • ‘All of these segments were digitally captured on video using a single camera in one uninterrupted, 90-minute take, with no edits or re-shoots.’
    • ‘There have also been rumors of massive last-minute edits (possibly connected with Webb's demand), which may explain the choppiness of the film's narrative.’
    • ‘The edits adjust the pacing to keep the movie feeling like one big Looney Tunes epic, rather than a cheap ‘clip job’ compilation.’
    • ‘I hope you'll participate in this effort by contributing feedback, edits, criticism, corrections, and additional anecdotes, either through the comments field below or by sending me email.’
    • ‘And then it goes one step further: 99% of the curse words and sexual references are removed in odd, disorienting edits.’
    • ‘But the Hollywood Reporter concluded that ‘even extensive edits had failed to produce an acceptably balanced portrayal.’’
    • ‘There were endless delays, right up until the premiere at Cannes earlier this year, where the film arrived a couple of days late due to some last minute edits.’
    revision, alteration, change, modification, qualification, adaptation, adjustment
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A version of written, recorded, or filmed material made as a result of editing.
      ‘a rough edit of some delightful Javanese gamelan music’
      • ‘Rough edits of visuals were sent out to musicians who were asked to use them as the basis for producing soundtracks.’
      • ‘A special edit of Basement Jaxx's Good Luck will accompany the opening coverage.’
      • ‘Having seen a recent edit in Hong Kong, the film is getting better day by day.’
      • ‘The final edit premieres tomorrow evening.’
      • ‘Studio executives agreed to re-edit the movie to appease censors, who are now happy with the final edit.’
      • ‘Can't wait to share the final edit with you in the coming months!’
      • ‘Sometimes scenes that work on the stage don't work in the final edit.’
      • ‘There are many edits of this film out there - some with nudity and some without.’
      • ‘The film received 20 minutes of applause when a rough edit was shown and won the Palme d'Or at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.’
      • ‘First up are a few remixes and edits of previously released songs, which are intriguing but hardly essential.’
      • ‘Has anyone else seen the new edit of Star Wars?’
      • ‘On the DVD that comes with the box set, a specially produced edit of the film makes this narrative clear.’
      • ‘Several of these tracks are edits of lengthy jam sessions.’
      • ‘As the days went on, I was keeping a close eye on how many shots I had in the bag, and I began cutting a rough edit of all the best clips we had.’
    2. 1.2 A featured selection of clothes, accessories, beauty products, etc. from a particular season or collection.
      ‘this is ELLE’s personal Autumn/Winter 2012 edit’
      • ‘Shop our edit of the best workwear pieces to nail office chic’
      • ‘Myer’s Autumn/Winter edit received a spectacular unveiling at Mural Hall last Thursday.’
      • ‘The shoe edit – we’ve got a great selection of treats for your feet, from dainty heels to flip flops, which will get you through every occasion this summer.’
      • ‘Last night, I went to the Time Warner Center to hear all about the L.K. Bennett Spring/Summer Edit.’
      • ‘Have a peek through our gallery to find our edit of the sales pieces worth splurging on.’
      • ‘Are you a fan of Rebecca’s designs? What do you make of her Autumn/Winter 2012 edit?’
      • ‘The high street edit: we bring you our pick of the season's best buys.’
      • ‘Be crafty with our edit of spring's best patchwork pieces.’
      • ‘For a quick-fix capsule beach wardrobe, here's our edit of the best at M&S.’
      • ‘Get inspired by our top two accessory trends as seen in the JETS Autumn/Winter edit for the season ahead!’

Origin

Late 18th century (as a verb): partly a back-formation from editor, reinforced by French éditer ‘to edit’ (from édition ‘edition’).

Pronunciation

edit

/ˈɛdɪt/