Definition of economist in English:

economist

noun

  • An expert in economics.

    • ‘Neoclassical economists say impatiently that it makes sense to borrow against the additional earnings that a university degree may generate.’
    • ‘Our senior economists were saying then that it could not happen again.’
    • ‘Development economists once were optimistic that the nation's poor countries could grow rapidly.’
    • ‘One of North America's leading agricultural economists said Tuesday that farms will have to adapt or perish.’
    • ‘Leading agricultural economists forecast that agriculture is moving to a bimodal system of production.’
    • ‘In the next decade, labor economists predict serious shortages in many forms of skilled and professional employment segments.’
    • ‘Japanese executives will probably never go as far a some free-market economists wish in slashing payrolls.’
    • ‘But many economists believe that relative poverty rather than absolute standards is what matters.’
    • ‘Now, labor economists argue that additional benefits are necessary.’
    • ‘Now they're greeting rising demand with more measured output, some economists believe.’
    • ‘Mainstream economists actually believe that in doing all of this they are seriously tackling environmental problems.’
    • ‘Some economists argued the rising price would not impact on the global economic recovery.’
    • ‘I am not in a position to tell economists how to pursue their craft.’
    • ‘But economists at universities still weren't impressed.’
    • ‘More important, economists are automatically skeptical about this sort of research.’
    • ‘The bull market in bonds in a deflation is completely ignored by mainstream economists.’
    • ‘Even industry backers are cautious about the new approaches, and some economists are skeptical.’
    • ‘Neoclassical economists have traditionally argued in favor of efforts to increase national saving in the long run.’
    • ‘He is chief economist at the Bank of Ireland.’
    • ‘Health economists have long noted variations in healthcare utilization by comparing geographic areas.’

Pronunciation:

economist

/ɪˈkɒnəmɪst/