Definition of east-west in English:

east-west

adjective

  • 1Extending between the east and the west.

    ‘freight leaving the port travels on an east–west axis’
    as adverb ‘there are several major rivers running east–west’
    • ‘The mountain range runs east–west across the island; the highest peak, Pico Ruivo, is 6,106 feet tall.’
    • ‘A look at a map will confirm that the "natural" east–west rail and road links converge on Montreal.’
    • ‘Round bales in east–west rows often have drifts on the south side.’
    • ‘The school was oriented along an east–west axis, providing due north and south exposures to all primary classrooms.’
    • ‘The hills run east–west, starting at the shore.’
    • ‘A key distinction is its east–west orientation that creates a wind tunnel effect, pulling heat from California's fertile Central Valley during the day and cool air from the Pacific Ocean at night.’
    • ‘It seems to this east–west migratory bird that we would do well to listen to them squawk.’
    • ‘Together, the two roads form a long east–west highway bisecting the centre of the city.’
    • ‘The site is also relatively long in the east–west direction, so avoiding the sun's glare at dawn and in the late afternoon.’
    • ‘In light of the situation, an unprecedented evacuation was underway along the entire south east American coast, with horrendous traffic jams along every east–west interstate highway.’
    • ‘The principal level of the building is organised along an east–west corridor, and efforts have been made in the planning of the major spaces to suppress an overtly institutional feel.’
    • ‘Any journey east–west involves mountain passes, some up to 4000m high.’
    • ‘The country's second east–west highway will have to connect the valleys.’
    • ‘The general orientation of the buildings is east–west, with most window openings in the north and south faces.’
    • ‘He informs us that Dresden was a main east–west railway junction for all of Germany.’
    • ‘It has been a major east–west city route for almost two centuries.’
    • ‘The place to begin is to re-establish the historic east–west streets running south of St Paul's Chapel.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to the relationship between the eastern and western parts of the world or of a country, region, or town.
      ‘East–West economic ties’
      • ‘The film is filled with quirky scenarios and surreal imagery depicting the East–West cultural clash.’
      • ‘No longer is there only a passive acceptance of the principle of a harmonic East–West combination.’
      • ‘For once, the plot and characters are almost secondary to the message about contemporary east–west politics, the nature of dictatorships, and our attitude to asylum seekers.’
      • ‘Scotland is a country of immense regional diversity, with the vast urban metropolis in central Scotland and its east–west rivalries in Edinburgh and Glasgow.’
      • ‘He also observes that US apparel importers continue to focus increasingly on north–south trade within the Western Hemisphere rather than on east–west trade between the Far East and the United States.’
      • ‘The East–West conflict is not new; it only became noticeable because of globalisation.’
      • ‘His book shows how through east–west fusion, using the elements of western design and eastern thinking, we can organise and decorate our rooms, design and plant our gardens, prepare and cook our meals to transform the home into an oasis of tranquillity.’
      • ‘This montage sold me on a hilarious, uplifting, and triumphant story of retro East–West politics.’
      • ‘The East–West rivalry has re-shaped the landscape of Europe.’
      • ‘That former naval base has been transformed into a special economic zone showing enormous commercial promise as a hub for East–West trade.’
      • ‘All these are examples of an east–west cinema (Asian-American, in this case) but they happen also to discard the latter part of the hyphen to focus more or less on the remaining eastern part.’
      • ‘I think the East–West rivalry is past its sell-by date.’
      • ‘Ani was on the main East–West trade route—the Silk Road—and more easily defended than Kars.’
      • ‘Together such passages point toward a different model of East–West relations, where it does not really make sense to think of the two sides as partners in the creation of modernism.’
      • ‘The annual event offered a spicy mix of East–West contemporary choreography that was both tasty and tart.’