Definition of dynamic in English:

dynamic

adjective

  • 1(of a process or system) characterized by constant change, activity, or progress:

    ‘a dynamic economy’
    • ‘The transaction process is a dynamic system that is composed of the interplay of the three information flows.’
    • ‘The key to development lies in a dynamic private sector.’
    • ‘The dynamic nature of curricula in general, and the curriculum at our school in particular, also poses a challenge to the interpretation of the results.’
    • ‘In this context, climate change should be viewed as a dynamic system of atmospheric processes and their products.’
    • ‘It could cap off an immense performance that has embraced all types of offensive records and included the development of a dynamic defense.’
    • ‘Because many factors are involved and they are dynamic, responses of crops cannot be easily predicted, yet agronomically they are of considerable importance.’
    • ‘All clinical interactions with adolescents must be seen against this dynamic background of development.’
    • ‘Human society, like any system composed of dynamic processes, depends on an external energy source.’
    • ‘The daytime social system is dynamic, with only some members of the population seen together at a time.’
    • ‘Both the capitalist economy and the world climate are complex, dynamic systems.’
    • ‘The many sequences involving herds of horses racing at full speed are very dynamic with effective use of the surrounds.’
    • ‘To use a cliché, the only constant in a dynamic economy is change.’
    • ‘The bulk of these are high-powered, dynamic events with ideas sparking and wit at a maximum.’
    • ‘According to MacDougall, game development is, by nature, dynamic.’
    • ‘The dynamic nature of the security market, combined with its seemingly perpetual immaturity, can leave any forecast about its future off target.’
    • ‘Emotional structures are not simply on or off: they are dynamic, and hence prone to myriad fluctuations in relation to thought and perception.’
    • ‘In this work, networks are conceived as dynamic systems that self-assemble and evolve in time through the addition and removal of actors and ties.’
    • ‘The critical point to be made at the outset of this discussion of the new regionalism is the dynamic relationship between developments in different parts of the world.’
    • ‘They see this as an area that needs to be better planned in order to deliver the kind of roads and other back up services demanded by a modern dynamic economy.’
    • ‘Web sites, by their very nature, are dynamic and need to change over time.’
    modern, liberal, advanced, forward-looking, forward-thinking, go-ahead, enlightened, enterprising, innovative, up-and-coming, new, avant-garde, modernistic, disruptive
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    1. 1.1Physics Relating to forces producing motion.
      Often contrasted with static
      • ‘The primary means by which a fly wing creates aerodynamic force is dynamic stall.’
      • ‘As for the carbon monoxide complex, our main interest was to characterize the dynamic motion of the 02 and imidazole axial ligands.’
      • ‘We would therefore postulate that individual lipid molecules in fusion intermediates would have canonical structure but increased dynamic motion.’
      • ‘The water going down your plughole, the planets going around the sun, the electrons spinning around a nucleus, they all reflect the same dynamic tension between opposing forces.’
      • ‘For Bernoulli's principle to dominate a dynamic situation, friction must be less dominant.’
    2. 1.2Linguistics (of a verb) expressing an action, activity, event, or process.
      Contrasted with stative
      • ‘This is a category of verb that contrasts with dynamic verb in the aspect system of a language, and relates to state and not action: in English, such verbs as belong, love.’
    3. 1.3 Denoting or relating to web pages that update frequently or are generated according to an individual's search terms:
      ‘the dynamic content of these sites keeps their audience informed and up to date’
      • ‘A CMS system will very often require SEO more than static sites, depending of the dynamic nature of the pages.’
      • ‘Now, what if we changed the page to something dynamic.’
      • ‘A typical visit to Indymedia's main Web site (www.indymedia.org) reveals an active, dynamic presentation of news.’
      • ‘Backups protect the HTML content but are not critical, since the Web farms do not generally host dynamic data.’
      • ‘This article served as an introduction to using includes in PHP and building a simple, dynamic website.’
      • ‘The first and most important component of MIRA's dynamic content is its weekly Arabic newsletter, The Monitor [ 117 ].’
      • ‘For example, suppose you have a large dynamic website that uses advanced scripts to put a user interface on an organization's financial system.’
      • ‘Dynamic profiling is information gathered from actual executions of a program.’
      • ‘The majority of the movement's dynamic Internet content is presented in Arabic for local consumption.’
      • ‘To allow for more interactivity, the concept of dynamic pages was added.’
      • ‘Desktop wallpaper is interesting enough, but dynamic applications can be put on the desktop as well.’
      • ‘Of course, what is so compelling about e-cards is that they're easy to send, easy to personalize, and have dynamic content.’
      • ‘Try to convert your dynamic pages to static ones, or let the server do it for you to reduce the number of parameters in the URL.’
      • ‘A common problem for sites using databases concerns dynamic urls.’
      • ‘This can be particularly useful for report generators or dynamic Web sites.’
      • ‘The sidebar is the place where small, dynamic applications live.’
      • ‘Robot programs that are used by search engines to index sites hate dynamic pages.’
      • ‘Web page content on pages that ads are served should be static not dynamic.’
      • ‘Google says that a dynamic URL with 2 parameters "should" get indexed.’
      • ‘Do you feel that to be successful an e-business needs a dynamic website?’
  • 2(of a person) positive in attitude and full of energy and new ideas:

    ‘a dynamic young advertising executive’
    • ‘A party insider agrees that she is dynamic: ‘She is focused and intelligent, and doesn't suffer fools gladly.’’
    • ‘Along comes the brash dynamic young executive with pronounced ideas upon improving efficiency.’
    • ‘Yet, they are dynamic and open to assimilate and incorporate new ideas that explain further aspects of change.’
    • ‘Although still only a junior, she was dynamic and powerful, with routines of outstanding difficulty on all four events.’
    • ‘The Netherlands has arrived on the scene in the last few years with a crop of vital, dynamic young directors.’
    • ‘Tony Meola, the league's reigning MVP, was as inspirational as he was dynamic last season.’
    • ‘He is so dynamic, right inside himself, and beautiful, and charming, and funny.’
    • ‘Fassel can't seem to find the fight mix, but when he is on, he is dynamic.’
    • ‘She was dynamic, a bit high-strung, of strong character, and completely devoted to the cause.’
    • ‘He is dynamic, ahead of the pack, and 100 per cent for the customer.’
    • ‘She said: ‘She was full of ideas, very dynamic, a great leader and with it all she had a very real sense of humility.’’
    • ‘He is dynamic in the loose and we expect big things of him.’
    • ‘He is dynamic and quite quick, and gets in behind the defence, which I think is why he gets noticed a lot.’
    • ‘We are always adapting and changing; we are dynamic, not stagnant beings.’
    • ‘You are dynamic, forceful and assertive while making new beginnings at work and soft, gentle and loving in personal relationships today.’
    • ‘As a child I was always out and about with friends, constantly doing things, we were very dynamic.’
    • ‘He is dynamic and a good ball handler, yet he also has the ability to scrummage well.’
    • ‘On stage, he is truly dynamic, exuding a palpable charisma comparable to the likes of Elvis Presley and Frank Sinatra.’
    • ‘He's dynamic, he's bright, he's an inspiring person.’
    • ‘The two of them together are a dynamic team, full of energy, life and very headstrong.’
    energetic, spirited, active, lively, zestful, vital, vigorous, strong, forceful, powerful, potent, positive, effective, effectual, high-powered, aggressive, driving, pushing, bold, enterprising
    electric, magnetic, flamboyant, passionate, fiery
    go-getting, zippy, peppy, sparky, high-octane, full of get-up-and-go, full of vim and vigour, full of beans, gutsy, spunky, ballsy, feisty, have-a-go, go-ahead
    go-go
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  • 3Electronics
    (of a memory device) needing to be refreshed by the periodic application of a voltage.

    • ‘The research produced an article and a patent for a novel type of dynamic computer memory.’
    • ‘This describes the method and apparatus for detecting an initialization signal and a command packet error in packetized dynamic random access memories.’
    • ‘The patent pertains to the method of forming a data storage capacitor with a wide electrode area for dynamic random access memory using double spacers.’
    • ‘Although not as dense, SRAM is many times faster than dynamic random access memory.’
    • ‘This is a method for manufacturing dynamic random access memory capable of increasing the storage capacity of the capacitor.’
  • 4Music
    Relating to the volume of sound produced by an instrument, voice, or recording.

    • ‘Brilliant orchestral playing and dynamic rhythmic articulation were the hallmarks of a stunning performance.’
    • ‘The Dolby Surround audio is also more dynamic than the original stereo broadcast, offering crystal clear dialogue and punchy music.’
    • ‘In theory this produces a cleaner and more dynamic sound.’
    • ‘Now at the peak of her powers, Zajick can apparently do just about anything she wishes with her voice, at all dynamic levels and throughout her range.’
    • ‘Even better is the sound, a dynamic, active Dolby Digital 5.1 surround.’

noun

  • 1A force that stimulates change or progress within a system or process:

    ‘evaluation is part of the basic dynamic of the project’
    • ‘In addition, bearing in mind one's inherent location within the dynamic of gender relations should inform the way in which one interacts with others, male and female.’
    • ‘The core dynamic in each of these cases was hypothesized to be rebelliousness and a protest against overbearing parents.’
    • ‘There is thus a new dynamic in the processes by which the past is captured, and communicated in the present.’
    • ‘The group dynamic also explains why Cheryl has had such a hard initiation.’
    • ‘Preferring a more engaged approach, Boutin has been involved in a number of projects to improve the cultural dynamic of the city.’
    • ‘More and more nations understand that this is the basic dynamic of globalization.’
    • ‘It's both like and unlike the mass of Gunn's work, and that gives me as reader a dynamic I find stimulating.’
    • ‘A similar dynamic was probably at play with this traditional tale.’
    • ‘The brief introduction of each individual within the group dynamic adds texture to an uncomplicated tale, and offers multiple opportunities for comedic repartee.’
    • ‘If the family dynamic does not cause Tracy's downfall, it certainly presents no obstacle.’
    • ‘I think the same dynamic exists within the elite of every culture.’
    • ‘I didn't like being stuck in a power dynamic where I had to force people to do what I could do on my own.’
    • ‘The terrible poverty at the global level he sees as getting worse, with the same dynamic at work within all countries, even industrialised ones.’
    • ‘The secret of decorative patterns is that the dynamic of part-whole relations within them seems to energize them.’
    • ‘It would create a strong dynamic for change and efficiency.’
    • ‘Placing families under surveillance alters the whole dynamic of family life, and may force parents into what one father called ‘defensive parenting’.’
    • ‘This view has taken hold even despite the fact that the real dynamic of progress is currently unremarkable.’
    • ‘This system is characterized by an expansive dynamic which invades every pre-technological enclave and shapes the whole of social life.’
    • ‘This can be seen as an early version of the Marxist dynamic of dialectical materialism.’
    • ‘For the sake of the team dynamic, I'm inclined to go for another woman, which rules this candidate out.’
  • 2Music

    another term for dynamics

Origin

Early 19th century (as a term in physics): from French dynamique, from Greek dunamikos, from dunamis power.

Pronunciation

dynamic

/dʌɪˈnamɪk/