Definition of duumvirate in English:

duumvirate

noun

  • A coalition of two people having joint authority or influence.

    ‘real power will devolve into the hands of a duumvirate’
    • ‘Part of Scotland's political problem is its journalism; successive first ministers and their colleagues have been unfairly treated by that odd media duumvirate of those two publications.’
    • ‘In truth, they worked superbly as a team - they were the duumvirate who, in the first, formative years of independence, effectively united and strengthened India.’
    • ‘They suggest a duumvirate rather than a single leader will run the final four weeks of this campaign - and it is conceivable the chancellor will emerge from the election as the senior partner’
    • ‘But, lo and behold, who should be sitting at the next table in the Paxman Club last week but the duumvirate who have been running our country now for over seven years?’
    • ‘It suits the French to adopt an anti-war posture at the moment because they are trying to propitiate a revival of their duumvirate over the European Union with the Germans.’
    • ‘One of the first acts of the duumvirate was reopen the national wage case and intervene in favour of the principle of equal pay for work of equal value.’
    • ‘Instead of a threesome, Iran is reverting to a duumvirate such as that which prevailed following the death of the founder of the Islamic Republic in 1989.’
    • ‘A show of unity, a joined-at-the-hip duumvirate at the top was what the party wanted to see.’
    • ‘Adding to latent mistrust of West Paksitan among Bengalis was the duumvirate's removal of him from Prime Ministership.’
    • ‘The interesting thing about this Government is not so much the sporadic outbursts of guerrilla warfare between Nos 10 and 11 Downing Street as the fact that the duumvirate of these two has endured for so long.’
    • ‘Townshend remained in office until his resignation in 1730, and for most of the 1720s the ministry should be seen as a duumvirate.’
    • ‘The duumvirate that has governed New Labour for a decade is just about stable…’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin duumviratus.

Pronunciation:

duumvirate

/djuːˈʌmvɪrət/