Main definitions of dupe in English

: dupe1dupe2

dupe1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Deceive; trick.

    ‘the newspaper was duped into publishing an untrue story’
    • ‘I'd give this CD away to charity, but then of course, some sucker would be duped into paying for it.’
    • ‘His family claim he and other military personnel were duped into taking part in what they believed were harmless experiments.’
    • ‘And the media seem to have realised they've been duped into giving that cheap publicity.’
    • ‘Also when you are in a vulnerable state you can be duped into acting out of character in order to appease your new best friends.’
    • ‘Do you consider this period in history a downtime, or have we just been duped into thinking so?’
    • ‘Police in Wickford are urging residents to be on their guard after an elderly woman was duped into handing over money to bogus callers.’
    • ‘Yet thousands of low-income and not-so-low-income people have been duped into putting their modest savings into these funds.’
    • ‘Customers were duped into paying fees up-front in the belief that their business rates would be reduced or their money refunded.’
    • ‘Parents are duped into believing that their child will have a better future.’
    • ‘Shoppers are being duped into handing over thousands of pounds by to a gang of street vendors who claim to be collecting money for children's wheelchairs.’
    • ‘How many of you mums out there have been duped into thinking you're going to get a free pass for at least one of your children to use during the holidays and got told the same?’
    • ‘Staff working at the store were duped into clearing up a smashed bottle of vinegar while one of the thieves walked into an open office and swiped wads of cash.’
    • ‘This did not mean the united front was a trick to dupe workers into joining the Communist parties.’
    • ‘Yet he and his family claim they have evidence that he was duped into joining a heroin smuggling role which they cannot persuade a Bangkok court to hear.’
    • ‘An elderly Swindon woman has narrowly escaped being duped into sending money to a dubious get-rich-quick scheme.’
    • ‘They're being duped into believing that what they're doing is solid.’
    • ‘Everyone will have the right to continue to collect their benefit weekly so do not be duped into losing your local post office.’
    • ‘They are worried that unsuspecting members of the public are being duped into buying the killer substances for them and catching traders unaware.’
    • ‘The operation was launched after dozens of complaints from members of the public who had been duped into buying poor quality goods.’
    • ‘Now, however, the well has run dry and the same people who were duped into funding the excesses will have to pay for picking up the pieces.’
    deceive, trick, hoodwink, hoax, swindle, defraud, cheat, double-cross, gull, mislead, take in, fool, delude, misguide, lead on, inveigle, seduce, ensnare, entrap, beguile
    con, do, sting, gyp, rip off, diddle, swizzle, shaft, bilk, rook, bamboozle, finagle, pull the wool over someone's eyes, pull someone's leg, pull a fast one on, put one over on, sell a pup to, take to the cleaners
    sucker, snooker, stiff, euchre, bunco, hornswoggle
    pull a swifty on
    cozen, sharp
    mulct
    View synonyms

noun

  • A victim of deception.

    ‘men who were simply the dupes of their unscrupulous leaders’
    • ‘The investment of personal, political and moral identity that this represents is so immense that after a short while such gullible dupes are simply incapable of recognising reality even when it stares them in the face.’
    • ‘Leavers have been considered victims or dupes enticed by railroad propaganda, speculators out to make a buck, or incompetents without experience or knowledge of farming.’
    • ‘Many of the shamans, mystics and magic men doing their tricks and fooling countless dupes are using old magician's tricks - they simply aren't admitting that they're tricks.’
    • ‘In their time, the inspectors have been called many things: spies, pawns, dupes.’
    • ‘They believe that people who think otherwise are, at best, the innocent dupes of Satan.’
    • ‘African Canadian females bringing cocaine into Canada concealed in luggage, acquitted as unknowing dupes of others, also appear before these courts in numbers disproportionate to their percentage in the general population.’
    • ‘The consumer may also be a dupe, the victim of exploitation by powerful interests.’
    • ‘Never mind that he seemed more like an innocent dupe entrapped by the intelligence services of Russia, Britain, and the U.S. The case against him has never been brought to trial, so we'll never know.’
    • ‘Company managements may be innocent dupes of rogue employees, it is also added, by local sources.’
    • ‘And it has a slightly ugly tendency to treat those who might actually enjoy going to museums as innocent dupes.’
    • ‘But they were neither victims nor dupes, as some historians have suggested.’
    • ‘In a sense these ignorant dupes are as much victims of the terrorists as their targets are.’
    • ‘Sadly, leftists believe defending media violence makes them hip crusaders for freedom; no, it only it makes them pawns, dupes, slaves.’
    • ‘Essentially it was one of being an innocent dupe.’
    • ‘Now, obviously these observers were simply dupes, and I admire his perspicacity in seeing straight through them.’
    • ‘If this is true then it seems that Christianity is simply an illusion, and those who believe it, dupes.’
    • ‘It is the simplest scam in the world and accounts for 20 pc of all internet fraud, taking millions of pounds from innocent dupes.’
    • ‘Far from responding like innocent dupes, we armed ourselves with wariness.’
    • ‘In this way, one would see the characters not only as simple dupes, but one would recognize his or her own potential to be duped, the latter point being made even more emphatically for the first-time viewer of the play.’
    • ‘We are fond of dismissing the participants as dupes, but we are the bigger fools for believing that the shows represent some kind of truth.’
    victim, gull, pawn, puppet, instrument
    fool, simpleton, innocent
    sucker, stooge, sitting duck, sitting target, soft touch, pushover, chump, muggins, charlie, fall guy
    mug
    pigeon, patsy, sap, schlemiel, mark
    dill
    juggins
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century: from dialect French dupe hoopoe, from the bird's supposedly stupid appearance.

Pronunciation:

dupe

/djuːp/

Main definitions of dupe in English

: dupe1dupe2

dupe2

verb & noun

  • [as verb] ‘how to dupe 35 mm slides on to 35 mm film’
    short for duplicate, especially in photography
    [as noun] ‘black-and-white dupes’
    • ‘How about burning a mixed CD of the wackiest, weirdest songs of all time, then duping it and giving copies to all your friends?’
    • ‘During the fights in the film, he had taken risks in doing all the stunts on his own, without the use of a dupe or a body double.’
    • ‘You could dupe however many copies you wanted, right?’

Pronunciation:

dupe

/djuːp/