Definition of dud in English:

dud

noun

informal
  • 1A thing that fails to work properly or is otherwise unsatisfactory or worthless.

    ‘all three bombs were duds’
    • ‘They were all duds, made impotent by days of rain.’
    • ‘I've promised some seeds to a friend in more northern climes, but have held off sending them for a few days while I waited to see if I'd carefully stored duds all winter.’
    • ‘A bomb disposal expert from Catterick was called in and the bomb was found to be a dud filled with concrete.’
    • ‘In 1990, after years of duds like Oliver and Company, Disney roared back into theatres with The Little Mermaid, which just happened to be awesome.’
    • ‘This new album features instant classics as well as instant duds.’
    • ‘After suffering through countless duds, Sci-Fi has finally produced something tolerable, even entertaining, which is really saying something.’
    • ‘There's really not a dud in the lot here as each show is well written and well intentioned from the outset.’
    • ‘A dud with 10 games is the same as a dud with no games.’
    • ‘Many of the projects, it turns out, have actually been built, and they've proved colossal duds, leading a growing chorus of critics to question the studies' methods.’
    • ‘However, I also suspect subscriptions will start trickling in once people know they aren't duds.’
    • ‘In fact, that's only a fraction of the cost of a license, especially when the much-touted property turns out to be a dud.’
    • ‘The Brazilian's music is so uneven (partly because he was so prolific) that some instalments are likely to be more rewarding than others, and though it is decently performed, this is definitely one of the duds.’
    • ‘This winter's Peter Pan disappointed and now comes a dud.’
    • ‘The quality was ‘very bad’ and some shopkeepers and bar staff immediately realised they were being handed duds.’
    • ‘There are some duds, some poems that not only risk the ridiculous but also achieve it.’
    • ‘So, after several hours, much discussion, a few duds, a few ringers and a couple of clear favourites, we all agreed on six whiskies that will be taken to the Speyside whisky festival for the final deciding round.’
    • ‘He knows the eternal value of his famous exit and is too smart to risk replacing it with a dud.’
    • ‘This proposal is a dud, but at least it's an innovative dud.’
    • ‘Books which turn out to be excellent (either by literary or commercial criteria), are rejected; and some books are selected which later prove to be duds.’
    • ‘Case says his style is different from the approach taken by venture-capital and buyout funds that hope the home runs in their portfolios more than compensate for the duds.’
    1. 1.1An ineffectual person.
      ‘a complete dud, incapable of even hitting the ball’
      • ‘Still, it's not as if he has been a complete dud when it comes to raising money.’
      • ‘I've just got this feeling that maybe he's a complete dud.’
      • ‘If all the players you off-load turn out to be duds you could perhaps pat yourself on the back.’
      • ‘You can reduce the risk of hiring a dud by bringing someone on as a consultant or contractor first, says Cleveland biotech entrepreneur Andy Lefkowitz.’
      • ‘She has been a complete dud in the deputy's position.’
  • 2Clothes.

    ‘buy yourself some new duds’
    • ‘The heat may be rising outdoors, but you can look and feel cool at the office with these stylish and breathable business duds.’
    • ‘The stars put on their best Chanel duds for a party that was far from being a dud.’
    • ‘It has a small selection of women's shoes and belts and a wide choice of designer duds, from simple Armani all the way up to extravagant Versace gowns.’
    • ‘Forget about dressing down; be one step ahead of your co-workers with these stylish duds that'll make you forget you're at work.’
    • ‘The lucky couples had one week between being notified and tying the knot, during which time they had to procure some dressy duds, break the news to their families, and secure a New York State marriage license.’
    • ‘Organize a clothes drive and donate duds to a local shelter.’
    • ‘Check out these duds for ruggedly handsome brainiacs like yourselves.’
    • ‘There you are dressed in your designer duds and no one can see you.’
    • ‘My friend Pedo sent me this link with the message: ‘I think you'd look mighty fine in some of these fancy duds!’’
    • ‘A N.Y. Times article on the new designer duds for budget airline Song reveals some of the requirements for flight attendant uniform design.’
    • ‘However ‘street’ they look, these duds are designed for performing.’
    • ‘They'll pick up and deliver your duds like any regular laundry service - with a few critical extras.’
    • ‘I don't care who you are, how much money you have or what fancy duds you wear.’
    • ‘Though mannequins are fixtures at most clothing retailers, they usually end up playing a sad second fiddle to the duds they display.’
    • ‘People look forward to it like a holiday, place their bets, put on their best professional sports-watching duds and throw lavish Super Bowl parties.’
    • ‘If travel isn't in your budget, maybe you'd like to sport some fancy new duds from Brown Sound Clothing.’
    • ‘The svelte denim-look duds are actually waterproof and breathable poly-nylon wonders.’
    • ‘The actors eschew Victorian costumes in favor of contemporary concert duds that have enough embellishments to suggest who the characters are, and they use props sparingly.’
    • ‘I was on my way home from school when this bunch of jerks in archaic duds tried to drive a knife into me.’
    • ‘I was wearing a festive but not overbearing reddish shirt and Keith was decked out in some sleek black duds.’
    outfit, clothes, costume, ensemble, suit, clothing, dress, attire, garments, garb, turnout, rig, uniform, livery, array, regalia, robes, finery
    View synonyms

adjective

informal
  • 1Not working or meeting standards; faulty.

    ‘a dud ignition switch’
    • ‘He has trailed his party and made a series of dud judgements.’
    • ‘California's reliable climate means there's never a dud vintage, says William Foster’
    • ‘He is a dud director with an inconsistent tone.’
    • ‘Scottish consumers waste £12,000 in their lifetimes by signing up for dud products pushed on to them by banks and other financial institutions, according to a report.’
    • ‘And then, you will have bought a dud investment.’
    • ‘Hey, in the same 88-and-a-half grueling minutes you might spend with a dud date, you get to meet 20 dud dates.’
    • ‘There was always a dud round in there, always a tournament-wrecker amid some mini gems.’
    • ‘Alternatively, it could be argued that the chart made a dud prediction, and astrology is entertaining hokum that has as much to do with the real Jupiter as chocolate bars do with Mars.’
    • ‘What woman would pay that for a guaranteed dud root?’
    • ‘Pubs and nightclubs which accepted dud euro banknotes from youths aged between 15 and 17 in return for alcoholic drinks could be prosecuted for serving young people.’
    • ‘It is still saddled with a bloated bureaucracy, too many branches, and a portfolio of shaky or dud loans to state-owned enterprises.’
    • ‘In sum, there isn't one dud piece in this blazingly honest gem of an anthology.’
    • ‘Since then Richard, from Bredbury, has installed - and ripped out again - four faulty kitchen sets after the furniture company continued to send him units from a manufacturer's dud batch.’
    • ‘If someone discovers that they've been ripped off with excessive fees and charges 4 or 5 years down the track or they're in a dud product with a poor rate of return, it's very hard to unwind that product.’
    • ‘Braised greens with smoked ham were the only real dud I found; they were merely irony, briny, and thin.’
    • ‘Since then, Mann has made two albums in a row of glorious melodies matched to grim sagas of addiction, dud relationships and dead-ends.’
    • ‘Do they go with another dud sequel, maybe even a prequel, or do they just remake the original?’
    • ‘His lyricism has developed, the beats are tighter and there are no dud songs.’
    • ‘A woman who ran dud healthcare courses has been found guilty of handing out certificates she claimed were from qualifications body City and Guilds.’
    • ‘When it was really looked at, the Commission overturned it, not because there was any pressure on it, but because they realised it was a dud idea.’
    defective, faulty, unsound, inoperative, broken, broken-down, not working, not in working order, not functioning, malfunctioning, failed
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Counterfeit.
      ‘she was charged with issuing dud cheques’
      • ‘Samantha was eventually arrested by the police in Barstow, Nevada trying to cash a dud cheque she had been given in a third-rate casino in Vegas in 1978.’
      • ‘As far as your girl being a ‘gold’ digger, she'd be lucky to find a dud Bombay rupee in your piggy bank, James.’
      • ‘Tengberg does not specify how the fraudster perpetrated their dastardly deeds - wouldn't the company have been insured against dud credit cards?’
      • ‘Trading Standards officers have warned shoppers buying jewellery over the internet this Christmas that they could be at risk from online fraudsters passing off fakes and dud goods as the real thing.’
      • ‘Most of the fraud was done by banking dud cheques and drawing on the funds before the cheques had cleared.’
      • ‘There remains, however, a world of difference between making an honest mistake and deliberately passing off a dud antique.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Australian
informal
  • Trick or swindle (someone)

    ‘they became increasingly aware of their rights and how much they were being dudded’
    • ‘The state government has been attempting to muddy the waters by accusing the Commonwealth of dudding Victorians.’
    • ‘The Federal Government has dudded regional Australia this year and is set to continue to do so for the next three years.’
    • ‘As they became increasingly aware of their rights and how much they were being dudded, they started to join the union.’
    • ‘All bar the thickest voters know when they're being dudded.’
    • ‘I drove home feeling that I had probably dudded myself out of $77.’
    • ‘I've been dudded on my overtime pay.’
    • ‘If someone comes to you and says 'I want $10 to buy myself a meal', you give him the $10 and he goes off and buys a packet of cigarettes, you'd feel that you'd been dudded.’
    • ‘His union was required to pick up the pieces after workers had been dudded by a string of collapses.’
    • ‘While customers might reckon they're being dudded by this approach they can always look on the bright side.’
    • ‘In their haste to dud the customer of $50, the "Dishonour Team" outdid themselves.’
    • ‘The Commission found he had been dudded of $1680 in travel allowance during his seven months as an apprentice plasterer.’
    • ‘Two shonky financial advisers have dudded more than a thousand people out of their life savings.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense item of clothing): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

dud

/dʌd/