Definition of duckboard in English:

duckboard

noun

usually duckboards
  • A board consisting of a number of wooden slats joined together, placed so as to form a path over muddy ground or in a trench.

    ‘he spread a tarpaulin over the duckboards’
    • ‘We deposited Paddy on the duckboards.’
    • ‘My first sight of a trench was of two greasy clay walls with a parapet on the top and duckboards on the bottom.’
    • ‘The descent was on a good track, past a nice farmstead, then a path through tufted grasses and a precipitous stretch right by the river that's made easy by very well engineered duckboards.’
    • ‘A trail of wooden duckboards led from Alma Road to the body, so as not to disturb any evidence.’
    • ‘The troops are staying in tents, on duckboards, and eating field fresh rations.’
    • ‘On a good day, the water in the trench bottom came to the tops of your boots; more typically it reached your knees or beyond, despite a double depth of duckboards laid somewhere in the depths of the mud.’
    • ‘However, all these surfaces were covered with timber-framed duckboards and this limited the general surface inspection although sections of boarding were lifted - where possible and safe in order to identify the covering material.’
    • ‘Indeed, Mr Tytherleigh did report on the condition of the duckboards and recommended their general replacement, yet made no mention of the danger or difficulty to him of removing them.’
    • ‘As though in sympathy, the path becomes boggier, and it eventually deteriorates to such a point that Forest Enterprise have put down some wooden duckboards.’
    • ‘A sump was dug in the bottom of each trench to accommodate water, and duckboards covered the sump.’

Pronunciation

duckboard

/ˈdʌkbɔːd/