Main definitions of dub in English

: dub1dub2dub3dub4

dub1

verb

  • 1with object and complement Give an unofficial name or nickname to.

    ‘the media dubbed anorexia ‘the slimming disease’’
    • ‘For years he has kept a newspaper clipping that dubbed him ‘the most hated accountant in Britain‘.’
    • ‘But Clive Brassier, the tree pathologist who first discovered the disease, has dubbed it Kernovii - the ancient name for Cornwall.’
    • ‘Apple Computer, seeking to hold its share of the education market, introduced a new computer dubbed eMac, designed specifically for schools.’
    • ‘I'd see him on my shed roof or on the fence every so often, and I dubbed him ‘Chessboard’ because he was black-and-white, and I had to call him something.’
    • ‘This humble natural wonder may have a name, but I dubbed it One Man's Cascade.’
    • ‘In order to make it all a bit more interesting they dubbed it the Big Bird Race and gave the competitors names.’
    • ‘He long ago eschewed the standard hip-hop uniform of sportswear and designer labels in favour of a unique look he dubs the ‘gentleman rebel‘.’
    • ‘This side project was dubbed Fruit Bats, named after a type of large, flying, fruit-eating tropical mammal.’
    • ‘This is made clear in a key scene from the first episode when the battle hardened character dubbed Sergeant Scream leads his troops in a firefight.’
    • ‘His lack of personal depth led Milligan to dub him ‘The Mr Nobody of the 20th century.’’
    • ‘Soon dubbed the Wild Child by the media, the girl became a guinea pig for researchers who wanted to see how much human behaviour is learned and how much is instinctual.’
    • ‘Italian press dubs her the ‘Cinderella of Orbassano’.’
    • ‘That was what Ellen, the car's owner, dubbed her.’
    • ‘By early 1990, invitations were being extended for him to return to Europe in what some in the media dubbed his ‘victory lap.’’
    • ‘Christian Nerlinger has already dubbed himself the club's ‘forgotten German’.’
    • ‘The project, dubbed the African Christmas Tree Promenade, is in its second year.’
    • ‘The colourful character, dubbed the ‘Queen of the council chamber,’ has been part of city life for decades as politician, mayor, sheriff, alderman and charity tour de force.’
    • ‘Last summer, the broadcaster tested video-on-demand with a new service dubbed Interactive Media Player.’
    • ‘The frenzy for designer homes has been dubbed the ‘brand-name property game‘.’
    • ‘The media later dubbed it the Feingold Diet, and parents have called their support group the Feingold Association.’
    nickname, call, name, give a name, label, christen, term, tag, entitle, style
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Make (someone) a knight by the ritual touching of the shoulder with a sword.
      ‘he should be dubbed Sir Hubert’
      • ‘Don Quijote is mightily impressed with his squire and plans to dub him a knight.’
      • ‘Lancelot called out a name; Sir Gawain, carrying the legendary sword that Arthur had pulled from the stone, walked to the squire who was called and tapped him on each shoulder with the sword, dubbing him a knight.’
      • ‘On bended knees, he begs him - in the exaggerated speech he has learned from the books on chivalry - to dub him a knight.’
      • ‘Personal advisor to the Queen, he was dubbed a Knight of the British Empire by Victoria when he was only forty.’
      • ‘Janus had never had a prouder moment than the day King Lancus dubbed him Knight, First Class and he remembered the pride in his father's eyes as he marched down the streets of Hajalar.’
      • ‘He decides to have the first knight he meets dub him - just like in the books.’
      • ‘During his stay there, he persuaded the bewildered innkeeper to officially dub him a knight.’
      knight, bestow a knighthood on, confer a knighthood on, invest with a knighthood
      View synonyms
  • 2with object Dress (an artificial fishing fly) with strands of fur or wool or with other material.

    ‘prewaxed thread has dramatically eased the process of dubbing’
    1. 2.1 Incorporate (fur, wool, or other materials) into a fishing fly.
  • 3with object Smear (leather) with grease.

    Compare with dubbin

Origin

Late Old English (in the sense ‘make a knight’): from Old French adober ‘equip with armour’, of unknown origin. dub (sense 2) is from the obsolete meaning ‘dress or adorn’.

Pronunciation

dub

/dʌb/

Main definitions of dub in English

: dub1dub2dub3dub4

dub2

verb

[with object]
  • 1Provide (a film) with a soundtrack in a different language from the original.

    ‘the film will be dubbed into French and Flemish’
    • ‘The series will be dubbed into five Indian languages and will be aired on five satellite channels of the ETV network.’
    • ‘In Spain, English language movies are dubbed into Spanish.’
    • ‘‘We are planning a nationwide release next year and have ensured that the film can be dubbed into different languages,’ he said.’
    • ‘It could be dubbed into Polish or Mongolian and you'd still be able to identify it as a product of Paris.’
    • ‘The film has been dubbed into English so badly that it is frequently difficult to tell who is meant to be talking, and the humour is so juvenile that even children sat in stony silence during the screening I attended.’
    • ‘The version of High Tension that is finally getting a United States release has been slightly trimmed (to get an R rating) and dubbed into English.’
    • ‘And Tricia Stewart, 54, and Lynda Logan, 59, have just returned from Rome where the film has been dubbed into Italian.’
    • ‘As for being dubbed into Japanese, I think it's kind of strange.’
    • ‘The disc offers a choice between the original French language track (with or without English subtitles) and a soundtrack dubbed into English.’
    • ‘Like many, I dislike watching anime dubbed into English, but in this particular situation, you may find yourself switching over.’
    • ‘Before Jackie Chan made the move to Hollywood, his films from Hong Kong and China would be dubbed into English and released to the Western public.’
    • ‘Eventually two prints were found, one dubbed into French and the other with German subtitles.’
    • ‘His performance is even strong enough to survive being dubbed into Italian.’
    • ‘The commentary was dubbed into twelve languages.’
    • ‘Reversing the cross-over trend, this is a Hindi film that will be dubbed into English and exported.’
    • ‘Thus, the usual pattern of Greek films being dubbed into English for American distribution was reversed.’
    • ‘Some movies have been dubbed into the Dong language.’
    • ‘No Kannada films will be dubbed into any other language.’
    • ‘Television is dominated by films and soap operas from Thailand and Hong Kong, dubbed into Khmer.’
    • ‘He wants to know if they speak the language that the movie has been dubbed into.’
    1. 1.1 Add (sound effects or music) to a film or recording.
      ‘background sound can be dubbed in at the editing stage’
      • ‘The coming and going stopped, but nobody bothered to stop talking, because the sound would be dubbed in later.’
      • ‘This seems a pity, as her voice on the commentary track was quite pleasant, certainly much more so than the generic American voice they dubbed in.’
      • ‘Rather than having the actual band performance recorded on videotape, a professional performance of the same music was dubbed onto the tape for subsequent viewing.’
      • ‘But the song was so popular that it was dubbed into the film later.’
      • ‘Just make sure there are plenty of shots of the women from behind, so you can dub in some voices later without having to worry about lip-synching.’
      • ‘All the while their comments are dubbed in over top of the music - the supposed purpose for the video.’
      • ‘Sound and voice-over narration are dubbed in.’
      • ‘Among other things, she found it difficult to talk and look pretty at the same time, so a lot of her dialogue had to be dubbed in.’
      • ‘If they could mime with mouth and fingers, all that noisy rubbish could be dubbed in at the recording studio.’
      • ‘Not many know that songs once dubbed into films have a slight lag.’
      • ‘The songs, when dubbed into films, have a slight lag.’
      • ‘The sound for the exterior scenes had to be dubbed in later, a process that took months, due to the primitive state of sound technology at the time.’
  • 2Make a copy of (a sound or video recording).

    • ‘At that time, video rental was a pretty new thing and unscrupulous retailers saw nothing wrong with purchasing a copy of The Muppets Take Manhattan and dubbing a dozen to rent to customers.’
    • ‘You call a shop or drop in and say that you want to buy a copy of a film on DVD or video and they would burn or dub a copy while you wait after streaming or downloading the information from a general source.’
    • ‘Higher-quality versions dubbed from actual DVDs entrusted to movie-industry insiders and reviewers can be on the market within days.’
    • ‘They can learn more about the composition process, dubbing and distributing digital recordings themselves, he adds.’
    • ‘When it comes to music, only 18 percent say they would never dub an audio cassette or CD, even though 43 percent acknowledge that doing so is wrong.’
    • ‘Arrangements were made to dub the tape.’
    • ‘He would play either guitar or piano and sing his weird lyrics into cheap tape recorders, saturating friends and acquaintances with hand dubbed cassettes.’
    • ‘The videotapes were dubbed onto tape with a visible time code with resolution to the frame.’
    • ‘We'll see how it sounds after she dubs it, but I really think we should get them all.’
    • ‘While working at home he dubbed his demo tapes on the dual cassette recorder and drove around well into the night dropping them off at every radio station in town.’
    • ‘Recordings were made, tapes were dubbed, and all was forgotten.’
    • ‘But, for a tape that was dubbed probably many times, it was pretty clear.’
    1. 2.1 Transfer (a recording) from one medium to another.
      • ‘Now it was a simple job to tape your favourite pop single from a radio broadcast, or to hook your cassette recorder up to your ‘record player’ and dub an entire LP onto a tape.’
      • ‘I've spent the evening dubbing the tapes onto my hard drive and can proudly present my very first videoblog from the Auchamlong minefield.’
      • ‘An employee had been dubbing a pornographic tape on taxpayer time.’
    2. 2.2 Combine (two or more sound recordings) into one composite soundtrack.
      ‘at the subsequent dubbing session these are amalgamated on to one track’

noun

  • 1An instance of dubbing sound effects or music.

    ‘the level of the dub can be controlled manually’
    • ‘But viewers should know that the English dub and the subtitles show remarkable differences.’
    • ‘The performances in the dub are terrible and the recording does nothing to put the characters into their environments.’
    • ‘The English dub closely follows the subtitles, which means the English version is a faithful adaptation of the original meaning.’
    • ‘In both the English dub and subtitles, the dialogue is a bit wordy and stilted, but it's rarely distracting.’
    • ‘The effects and music in the English dub tend to sound slightly better than in their Swedish counterparts, although the dialogue seems unnaturally loud.’
    • ‘The English dub is passable and at times more evocative than the subtitled translations, but overall the subtitles seemed more faithful to the tone and spirit of the story.’
    • ‘Still, it's remarkable how far dubs of Asian films have come over the past few years.’
    • ‘The voice work for the American dub is pretty good, at least compared to the usual quality of American anime dubs.’
    • ‘The voice actors on the Japanese dub tend a little too far toward the melodramatic end of the scale, though, so I can't recommend one track over the other.’
    • ‘I find I prefer the dub to the subtitles for this series, as the subtitles are a bit dry and prosaic.’
    • ‘I'll admit I prefer the English dubs on martial arts films, so I always pick that option first.’
    • ‘Personally (and I'm sure others feel the same way), I'd rather read subtitles that listen to bad dubs.’
    • ‘This first volume also includes Spanish and French dubs.’
    • ‘Bad dubs, like this one, ruin the entire experience.’
    • ‘The subtitles are fantastic, and the dub is comparatively easy to listen to as well.’
    • ‘The stereo audio, available in the original Japanese as well as an English dub, has a nice wide soundstage.’
    • ‘It is one of the rare animes where the dub is quite easy to listen to.’
    • ‘In terms of dubbing, the quality of the English dub is debatable and comes down to a matter of preference.’
    • ‘This boxed set is the best way to see it because the dub ruins the effect.’
    • ‘If you like turning your brain off when you watch anything then you've got the dub to save you from all that reading.’
  • 2mass noun A style of popular music originating from the remixing of recorded music (especially reggae), typically with the removal of some vocals and instruments and the accentuation of bass guitar.

    • ‘Expanding on the same influences, Mind Elevation reaffirms the Nightmares' connections with soul music and dub, with the opening tracks, Mind Eye and Say-Say, setting up the tone perfectly.’
    • ‘He was politicised from an early age, when he first started listening to reggae and dub music.’
    • ‘Infatuated with reggae and dub from an early age, Sherwood was a London club DJ in his early-teens.’
    • ‘In an effort to ensure that the passengers arrive wherever they're headed in a good mood, most busses have some kind of music to keep everyone entertained - reggae, calypso or dub.’
    • ‘It's hard to believe that it's been ten years since Germany's Basic Channel label crossed the threshold between deep techno and dirty dub.’
    • ‘He had seared rock 'n' roll culture with an apocalyptic brew of punk, ska, rockabilly, dub - you name it - and then he seemed to just walk away.’
    • ‘The bottom line, I think, is that the music here is all of an incredibly high level, and even the most diehard fans of reggae and dub probably will find something new among the twenty tracks here.’
    • ‘It plays like a catalogue of reggae and related styles, of which dub is merely one ingredient.’
    • ‘On the other hand, Femi's light and highly finessed approach to Afro-beat is applied to a more diverse palette, incorporating dub, reggae, Latin and assorted Afro-pop elements.’
    • ‘There's nothing like roots, dub and reggae to get you moving.’
    • ‘Their recent compilation disk The Observation of Ruins showcases an eclectic blend of dub, drum and bass, techno, acid jazz, and Hip Hop.’
    • ‘Gough's songwriting draws influences from Radiohead and Revolver and Rubber Soul-era Beatles, but with a good deal of folk and a bit of hip-hop, soul and dub thrown in for good measure.’
    • ‘Find Some Shades combines minimalist techno, dub and digitally processed noises into melodic constructions.’
    • ‘Dub Selector is more than an ode to reggae dub music; it is an integration of dub, soul and ambience resulting in one smooth track after another.’
    • ‘It's with that in mind that Sokel plays everything from dub and reggae to pop and folk music.’
    • ‘The result is Say No to the Vendettas, a hearty offering from the band's trademark palette of punk, rockabilly, reggae and dub.’
    • ‘I don't think I ever expected such a beautiful blend of dub, roots reggae and world music to come to my ears.’
    • ‘Elsewhere, Jon mixes up elements of dub, jazz and ambient music into the requisite funk beats.’
    • ‘Techno Animal sounds nothing like that however - they've been making distorted dub and hip hop for almost ten years now.’
    • ‘There is a commendable variety of entertainment - local bands play on Mondays, there's reggae and dub on Tuesdays, funk on Fridays and an acoustic open-mic session on Sundays.’

Origin

1920s: abbreviation of double.

Pronunciation

dub

/dʌb/

Main definitions of dub in English

: dub1dub2dub3dub4

dub3

noun

US
informal
  • An inexperienced or unskilful person.

verb

[with object]Golf
informal
  • Misplay (a shot).

Origin

Late 19th century: perhaps from dub in the obsolete technical sense ‘make blunt’.

Pronunciation

dub

/dʌb/

Main definitions of dub in English

: dub1dub2dub3dub4

dub4

verb

[no object]dub in/up
Northern English
informal
  • Pay up; make a contribution.

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

dub

/dʌb/