Definition of dryad in English:

dryad

noun

  • 1(in folklore and Greek mythology) a nymph inhabiting a tree or wood.

    • ‘The dryads are passionate creatures, easily incited to anger about such things.’
    • ‘He slapped away a few dryads, but they still surrounded him.’
    • ‘It turned out to be a dryad of some sort, looking exactly the way storybook fairies were portrayed.’
    • ‘I suppose he was telling the truth when he said that he was attacked by dryads and was forced to abandon his friend,’ Kiya said thoughtfully.’
    • ‘They were once the ancient guardians of the forests, along with dryads and sprites.’
    • ‘From the start, I have recognized the dryads and spirits in the many trees I regularly pass and interact with.’
    • ‘The dryads, the flower faeries and the nymphs dwelled in various trees and plants around the forest.’
    • ‘They enter a beautiful meadow, whereupon Don Quijote practices the part of a lunatic - loudly telling the gods, nymphs and dryads of the meadow of his scorned love for Dulcinea.’
    • ‘He will reawaken the dryads, who will become predatory while their wardens sleep.’
  • 2A dark brown Eurasian butterfly with two prominent bluish eyespots on each forewing.

Origin

Via Old French and Latin from Greek druas, druad- tree nymph, from drus tree.

Pronunciation:

dryad

/ˈdrʌɪad//ˈdrʌɪəd/