Main definitions of dropsy in English

: dropsy1dropsy2

dropsy1

noun

  • old-fashioned or less technical term for oedema
    • ‘The leaves are bitter and are used as a remedy for ophthalmia, ulcers, dropsy, cholera and beriberi associated with a weakness of the heart.’
    • ‘When he set out for Portugal in 1754, in the vain hope of recovering his health, Fielding was suffering so greatly from gout, dropsy, asthma, and other complications that he had to be carried aboard the Queen of Portugal.’
    • ‘Cures using herbs for diseases such as fever, jaundice, dropsy and leprosy are enumerated.’
    • ‘It is applied against epilepsy, paralysis, dropsy, etc.’
    • ‘In the 1925 edition of Osler's text, respiratory failure was described as ‘frothy pulmonary edema that resembles serum, not the sanguinous transudative edema fluid seen in dropsy or congestive heart failure’.’
    • ‘After that, despite my best efforts, Hernandez succumbed to dropsy and Eduardo developed terrible fungus which consumed his fins and turned his beautiful blue body brown.’
    • ‘To explain Sophia's increasing size and necessary absence away from the family, the king was told that she was bloated due to dropsy and had to be sent away to recover.’
    • ‘Disease manifestations, such as fever, dropsy, diarrhea, or cyanosis, were used as names of diseases.’
    • ‘When William Withering, a Shropshire physician and botanist, heard how a man with dropsy had recovered after drinking a herbal medicine that had been brewed from foxglove, he had to know exactly how the plant had worked.’
    • ‘From such examination, physicians considered that they could identify problems ranging from jaundice to dropsy, diphtheria, pregnancy, and anxiety.’
    • ‘These included abortion, asthma, dropsy, sterility, cancer, dysmenorrhea, melancholy, empyema, worms, and jaundice to name only a few.’
    • ‘Mediaeval monks were aware of the benefits of salt mud and concentrated sea water and used them to treat rheumatism, dropsy and obesity.’
    • ‘Dr Johnson was overweight and suffered from chronic bronchitis, gout and dropsy, as well as nervous tics and compulsive gesticulations.’
    • ‘I think very much that your little guy has dropsy.’
    • ‘About a year ago, edible mustard oil laced with a cheap chemical substance became a public health issue when it was revealed that it led to development of dropsy.’
    • ‘It was said to be a cure for dropsy and bladder stones.’
    • ‘She suffered from gout and dropsy for many years, though her death in 1619 was sudden.’
    • ‘Having recognized her symptoms as heart disease and dropsy because they led to his mother's death, he knew what could relieve her pain and gave her a medicine made from a special herb called foxglove.’
    • ‘Bright separated dropsies of renal origin from dropsies due to other causes, such as heart and liver disease.’
    • ‘We discovered two cases of cholera, one of TB, one of the dreaded lurgy while another was afflicted with a dropsy so massive we had no choice but to put him to sleep.’

Origin

Middle English: shortening of idropesie, earlier form of obsolete hydropsy, via Old French and Latin from Greek hudrōps dropsy, from hudōr water.

Pronunciation:

dropsy

/ˈdrɒpsi/

Main definitions of dropsy in English

: dropsy1dropsy2

dropsy2

noun

British
informal
  • A tip or bribe:

    ‘McCloy's little dropsy for services rendered’
    gratuity, baksheesh, bonus, little extra, bit extra, present, gift, reward, inducement
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s: slang, elaborated form of slang drop ‘a bribe’.

Pronunciation:

dropsy

/ˈdrɒpsi/