Definition of droll in English:

droll

adjective

  • Curious or unusual in a way that provokes dry amusement.

    ‘his unique brand of droll self-mockery’
    • ‘The whole scenario is rather droll at this point.’
    • ‘If you're looking for a nice enough, quirky and droll adventure film that you won't remember on Monday, then here's your movie.’
    • ‘The duke was characteristically droll about his political career.’
    • ‘Ferguson was sympathetic enough about his stricken team-mate, but could not resist a bit of droll humour.’
    • ‘The tabloids did their thing, were quite droll about it.’
    • ‘No matter how serious the topics, there will always be instances when it's impossible not to smile, so droll are the minimalist observations and asides.’
    • ‘No, I didn't do the chicken dance or anything so droll.’
    • ‘Though not slapstick or of the knee-slapping variety, Hamer is droll and often wickedly subtle in his deadly strain of humour.’
    • ‘Surely the man who dispatched such droll rejection slips to thousands of chagrined writers should not be too dismayed to find himself paid back in kind-albeit with, as editors are wont to say, sincere regrets.’
    • ‘Of course, the jokes are all on backwoods Southerners, so if that isn't an amusing subject to you, don't pick up this droll satire.’
    • ‘They're droll, yet morbid, featuring amusing little colorful happy people behaving with perfect presence of mind as their 747 ditches into the Atlantic.’
    • ‘They were as droll as when I saw them back in February.’
    • ‘He made the tasting far less arduous than his younger, more dashing, but decidedly less droll counterpart who was running the show this time around.’
    • ‘But just as often, the movie is droll, filled with pithy, hardboiled comebacks.’
    • ‘The decorations alone, often of densely packed plants and flowers with a symbolic significance now lost on most of us, are astonishingly imaginative, sometimes bawdy and often droll.’
    • ‘Many of the show's laughs derive from Lee's droll determination to take the ditty literally: how can an owl play a small guitar?’
    • ‘The running commentary is informative and amusingly droll.’
    • ‘Perhaps, I think, he just went out on one of his famous walks, walks that I shared for many droll miles.’
    • ‘He's rather droll when he frames his request, but it's a sincere one.’
    • ‘The use of old cut-out photographs of the main protagonists, against backcloths, is a neat stylistic device and Evans' narration is droll and knowing.’
    funny, humorous, amusing, comic, comical, mirthful, chucklesome, hilarious, rollicking
    quaint, odd, strange, queer, eccentric, outlandish, bizarre, whimsical
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noun

archaic
  • A jester or entertainer; a buffoon.

    • ‘When English replaced Cornish as the language of Cornwall, the drolls' stories began to die out as the Cornish drolls died.’
    humorist, comedian, comedienne, comic, funny man, funny woman, wag, wit, jester
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Origin

Early 17th century (as an adjective): from French drôle, perhaps from Middle Dutch drolle ‘imp, goblin’.

Pronunciation

droll

/drəʊl/