Definition of dramatic in English:

dramatic

adjective

  • 1attributive Relating to drama or the performance or study of drama.

    ‘the dramatic arts’
    ‘a dramatic society’
    • ‘Will you take part in some amateur dramatic or operatic society's play or opera?’
    • ‘He has a good eye for the dramatic or touching vignette and is a superb storyteller.’
    • ‘She saw Hilary's dramatic potential and trained her to perform as a voiceless clown.’
    • ‘A structure in which dramatic or ceremonial performances could be staged in front of an audience.’
    • ‘As a student, I did a fair amount of acting with the university dramatic society.’
    • ‘Puccini's powerful lyricism and dramatic timing were beautifully captured by the company.’
    • ‘No studies have assessed the impact of the dramatic society on the lives of its participants.’
    • ‘Roderick Harris Royal College of Art graduate whose dramatic paintings are darkly humorous.’
    • ‘The development of lianpu is closely related to that of Chinese dramatic art.’
    • ‘He grades the comic and the dramatic to get to the idea that art is a way of life, thinking, or a psychic condition.’
    • ‘It's a good choice for an amateur dramatic society as it places minimal strain on the actors.’
    • ‘He did his dramatic training at Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, London.’
    • ‘And members of local amateur dramatic societies will be dressing up as characters from the film.’
    • ‘Instead, pop culture, European legends and dramatic arts are clearly traceable.’
    • ‘Set up in 1893, the dramatic society claims to be the oldest independent one in the country.’
    • ‘To your average punter, dance is to the dramatic arts what free jazz is to the musical.’
    • ‘How many people of working age, for instance, now join amateur dramatic societies, or sign up to be Girl Guide leaders?’
    • ‘An energetic round of theatre visits kept her in touch with the latest in dramatic writing and performance.’
    • ‘Something like this is a dream come true for any amateur dramatic society.’
    • ‘The local dramatic society will provide street entertainment in various guises.’
  • 2(of an event or circumstance) sudden and striking.

    ‘a dramatic increase in recorded crime’
    • ‘Now this, I have to say, constitutes a hugely dramatic change in circumstances.’
    • ‘But if he does come back, it will be a very dramatic event for the Red Sox and their fans.’
    • ‘This study encountered no evidence of such sudden dramatic transformation.’
    • ‘In the midst of these dramatic circumstances Che returned to the camp on March 20.’
    • ‘The police will be making a press conference about today's dramatic events at 7pm tonight.’
    • ‘The fall of the Berlin Wall was the most dramatic event of the political revolution.’
    • ‘Despite signs of economic recovery, there's slim hope of a dramatic turnaround this year.’
    • ‘The dramatic events were caught on camcorder by an Evening Press reader, and featured on our front page yesterday.’
    • ‘And in one of the most dramatic shifts our society has seen, two-thirds of all moms also work outside the home.’
    • ‘Earlier, in a dramatic outburst, he claimed he was not getting a fair hearing after being refused permission to call a witness.’
    • ‘It uses locally collected artefacts, and pictures of the dramatic events of 1940, to tell its story.’
    • ‘The human capacity to adapt to dramatic changes in life circumstances is impressive.’
    • ‘The news comes after dramatic increases in the money spent on road calming measures over the last few years.’
    • ‘Maybe because of the dramatic drop in the demand for his portraits, his art underwent a transformation.’
    • ‘Now everything is geared up for a dramatic conclusion this Sunday as the sport's top riders race to the wire in search of title glory.’
    • ‘It comes on top of an expected 500m euro shortfall in tax returns and a dramatic downturn in the economy.’
    • ‘We usually prefer gradual and mild change to sudden and dramatic change.’
    • ‘Over the past 10 to 15 years, there have been some dramatic shifts in Western societies.’
    • ‘This is especially so as there does not seem to have been a dramatic increase in the incidence of such families.’
    • ‘But when the market was reopened a dramatic transformation started to develop.’
    considerable, substantial, sizeable, goodly, fair, reasonable, tidy, marked, pronounced
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    1. 2.1 Exciting or impressive.
      ‘he recalled his dramatic escape from the building’
      ‘dramatic mountain peaks’
      • ‘There is little in the realms of fashion more exciting than making a dramatic gesture in the simplest manner.’
      • ‘It was electrifying and dramatic and it gave me a thrilling shot of adrenaline.’
      • ‘Both provide a dramatic setting for the art commissions of building elements, fittings and finishes’
      • ‘The lads again pulled out a dramatic victory in a match full of drama and excitement.’
      • ‘He will talk briefly on these too, with a backdrop of dramatic mountain scenery.’
      • ‘Giant fireballs and trails of fire accompany the performers in the energetic and dramatic display.’
      • ‘The discussions which followed the show were often more dramatic than the performance.’
      • ‘Your popularity and fortune will soar if you make a dramatic impression.’
      • ‘It has the most imposing peaks, the most dramatic glaciers, the most spine-tingling views.’
      • ‘Its energy is lively, startling and dramatic - often associated with breaking down or breaking out.’
      • ‘The red mountains make a dramatic back-drop and the sun scorches down relentlessly.’
      • ‘This final attempt to contain the leader is sometimes one of the most dramatic and exciting parts of the game.’
      • ‘The opening evokes the peace of the mountains just before a dramatic thunderstorm.’
      • ‘Next month it is drama that will be at the forefront, as the channel throws open its schedule for a dramatic week of exciting programmes.’
      • ‘Book now for the opportunity to take in this dramatic and entertaining performance.’
      • ‘Its cities are colourful and animated, its mountains dramatic and its hills verdant and tranquil.’
      • ‘The most dramatic escape was that of the submarine Orze, which had initially been interned in neutral Estonia.’
      • ‘And true to this, you are able to snipe your target and make a dramatic escape afterwards.’
      • ‘The Greek national soccer team was not the only team to shock odds makers with a dramatic championship victory.’
      • ‘It is hardly a dramatic sequence but a moving one, here superbly realised by Danish forces under Gerd Albrecht.’
      exciting, stirring, action-packed, sensational, spectacular, startling, unexpected, tense, suspenseful, rip-roaring, gripping, riveting, fascinating, thrilling, hair-raising, rousing, lively, animated, spirited, electrifying, impassioned, emotive, emotional, emotion-charged, moving, soul-stirring, powerful, heady
      striking, eye-catching, impressive, imposing, spectacular, breathtaking, dazzling, vivid, amazing, astounding, astonishing, surprising, staggering, stunning, sensational, awesome, awe-inspiring, remarkable, notable, noteworthy, distinctive, graphic, extraordinary, outstanding, incredible, phenomenal, unusual, rare, uncommon, out of the ordinary
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    2. 2.2 (of a person or their behaviour) intending or intended to create an effect; theatrical.
      ‘with a dramatic gesture, she put a hand to her brow’
      • ‘His technique and his dramatic personality made him by far the greatest dancer I had seen at that time.’
      • ‘Cavendish and her dramatic heroines alternately invite and reject the gaze of the other, of desire, and of the crowd.’
      • ‘I'm not dramatic about anything that happens to me in this game or within my life.’
      • ‘She is very dramatic as in all the roles she tackles, and I am sure that live onstage she is much more convincing.’
      • ‘If you are dramatic you have a gift for mimicking and feel the spirit of the situation.’
      • ‘She was so dramatic, hunched over the sink like that, mascara dripping off the tip of her nose.’
      • ‘Extravagant designs that look theatrical, dramatic and poetic are given heavy emphasis.’
      • ‘Then I guess he was always a dramatic kid, he did a really impressive dyeing scene.’
      • ‘He is as dramatic as they come and a delight for journalists looking for good copy.’
      theatrical, stage, dramaturgical, thespian
      exaggerated, theatrical, ostentatious, actressy, stagy, showy, melodramatic, overacted, overdone, overripe, actorly, histrionic, affected, mannered, artificial, stilted, unreal, forced
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Origin

Late 16th century: via late Latin from Greek dramatikos, from drama, dramat- (see drama).

Pronunciation

dramatic

/drəˈmatɪk/