Definition of draconian in English:

draconian

adjective

  • (of laws or their application) excessively harsh and severe.

    ‘the Nazis destroyed the independence of the press by a series of draconian laws’
    • ‘There was a time when I would have argued that our libel laws were draconian and should be amended.’
    • ‘They have called it the most dangerous and draconian legislation ever proposed.’
    • ‘The penalty imposed by law is not draconian, and serves more as a reminder to perform a common sense action.’
    • ‘No matter how draconian the laws become, Europe is not capable of shutting its borders.’
    • ‘I believe that draconian laws are always wrong and the best society is one with the least legislation.’
    • ‘It is madness to suggest the draconian speeding laws we have should apply here.’
    • ‘These hard facts indicate real motives behind enactment of this draconian law.’
    • ‘Imposing draconian laws that restrict civil liberties will not prevent terrorist attacks.’
    • ‘There was worrying talk about it not being possible to repeal the draconian anti-trade union laws.’
    • ‘He has supported open prisons and opposed unnecessarily draconian anti-terrorism laws.’
    • ‘Of course, it won't sell over here because we have some of the most draconian censorship laws in the world.’
    • ‘As we look through this part, the question we need to ask is whether it is draconian legislation.’
    • ‘New laws are being passed, draconian laws that destroy lives and syphon happiness.’
    • ‘In this way such Treaty Articles are prevented from becoming too harsh or draconian in their application.’
    • ‘This awful, draconian law has not been used to safeguard copyright, however.’
    • ‘Had we been caught, we could have faced two years in jail under draconian new media laws.’
    • ‘No amount of naval ships or coastguards or draconian laws will stop it happening.’
    • ‘Mr Banks said that the legislation was draconian in its approach.’
    • ‘This draconian legislation included provision for flogging, curfew, and internment.’
    • ‘It's about time we sorted a sensible compromise and not a draconian law.’
    harsh, severe, strict, extreme, drastic, stringent, tough, swingeing, cruel, brutal, oppressive, ruthless, relentless, summary, punitive, authoritarian, despotic, tyrannical, arbitrary, repressive, iron-fisted
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Origin

Late 19th century: from the name of Draco (see Draco) + -ian.

Pronunciation

draconian

/drəˈkəʊnɪən/