Definition of douche in English:

douche

noun

  • 1A shower of water:

    ‘I felt better for taking a daily douche’
    • ‘To this feverish regime of irresponsibility, is it possible that he has recently administered the first bracing douche of an overdue cold bath?’
    • ‘But this magical tale ends with a typically Chinese douche of cold water.’
    • ‘This a book that will act as a cold douche to anyone who still harbours any romantic notions about the ‘glamour’ of the sport of boxing.’
    • ‘He does say though that the ‘stunts that wouldn't look amiss in a video arcade’ and he praises him for expertly applying ‘the cold douche of unreality’.’
    wash, soak, dip, shower, douche, soaping, sponging, toilet
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A jet of liquid applied to part of the body for cleansing or medicinal purposes:
      ‘the mixture may be used as an antiseptic douche or as a gargle’
      • ‘But this douche au jet - apparently guaranteed to firm up my epidermis and get rid of nasty toxins - is, in retrospect at least, tremendously exhilarating.’
      • ‘A vinegar and water douche is substituted for patients who are sensitive to iodine.’
      • ‘In the end, the douche circulatoire turned out to be the kind of thing the fishmonger does to a fish, without all the messy gutting and filleting.’
      • ‘Some practitioners recommend using a probiotic supplement added to lukewarm water as a douche for yeast infections.’
      • ‘They use it topically, they use it as mouthwash, enema and douche and they get some pretty amazing results with a Sheep Sorrel decoction alongside the four herbs.’
      • ‘The leaves and flowers can be made into a tea and used as a douche for trichomonas.’
      • ‘Many doctors recoil at the thought of a yogurt douche, but none can object to women eating yogurt.’
      • ‘He or she also asks the patient to use a povidone-iodine douche the morning of surgery, in an effort to reduce the possibility of infection.’
      • ‘I was inspected naked and given a 10-gallon douche with one nurse and two guards standing around joking.’
      • ‘Other treatments included massages with hot fomentations and salt glows; electric light cabinet for patients with pleurisy and obesity; infra ray lamp treatments; and sitz baths, perineal douches, and hot and cold compresses.’
      • ‘The hosing down is followed by a douche abdominale, which is more of the same but lying down, after which I luxuriate in a stimulating bain hydromassant before being wrapped in hot seaweed for soothing, therapeutic algothérapie.’
      • ‘All of the patients bathe endlessly, both inside and out, with salt baths, steam baths, showers, douches, and a high-powered enema machine, with the belief that cleansing the body would somehow cleanse the race.’
      • ‘She had scrubbed between her legs and used such harsh douches that she was raw.’
      • ‘One of the most invigorating treatments is the grande douche, which involves another pressurised hose.’
      • ‘Half a tin of that and you would need another douche circulatoire to jolt your arteries open.’
      • ‘Hoping the heritage of the Massengill name will be strong enough to hold its own against deep-pocketed new-corners, SmithKline Beecham this spring will introduce extensions to its feminine hygiene line best known for douches.’
      • ‘It is even used as a douche and topically for treating fungal infections and soothing stings.’
    2. 1.2 A device for washing out the vagina.
      • ‘Irritation can be caused by douches, vaginal sprays, contraceptives, tampons and pads, soap, or detergent and fabric softeners.’
      • ‘Vaginitis should not be treated with douches or deodorant sprays.’
      • ‘Though I usually warn women to stay away from commercial douches, we both think a mild vinegar douche afterwards may not be such a bad idea.’
      • ‘Early prophylactic recommendations for nonoccupational HIV exposure included the use of vinegar douches and nonoxynol - 9.’
      • ‘She proudly showed off the condoms, lubricant and standard paraphernalia before producing ‘the most important thing’ - a vaginal douche.’
      • ‘Perhaps you've also heard of feminine deodorant sprays and perfumed douches.’
      • ‘Women were also excluded if they reported use of diaphragms, douches or spermicides.’
      • ‘There were creams, and douches, and nail polish, and thousands of different types of makeup.’
      • ‘You might be sensitive to chemicals in certain products, such as douches, soaps, scented toilet paper, personal lubricants, or contraceptives like foams, sponges, and the sperm killer nonoxynol - 9.’
      • ‘Typically, a douche has a plastic applicator to insert into the vagina for washing purposes.’
      • ‘Two major brands of douches were used by 87 percent of the women, and the odds ratios relating each brand to bacterial vaginosis or change in vaginal flora were similar for each brand.’
      • ‘Pelvic rest, which includes abstinence from intercourse and avoiding the use of tampons or douches, is advised for one week.’
      • ‘Female hygiene products such as douches, perfumed sanitary napkins, frequent bubble baths, synthetic undergarments, which trap moisture, must be avoided.’
      • ‘For instance, they listed among the contents of her suitcase (which she kept at the Waldorf hotel for rendezvous there) both condoms and douches.’
      • ‘Egyptian papyri describe pessaries and vaginal douches, which could have been effective.’
      • ‘The chemicals in vaginal douches may irritate your vagina and change the normal balance of good bacteria.’
      • ‘If you knew how some of these tampons and douches were made, you'd find these ads even more absurd.’
      • ‘Antibacterial vaginal douches, spermicides, and certain oral antibiotics may cause changes in vaginal bacteria.’
  • 2North American informal An obnoxious or contemptible person (typically used of a man):

    ‘that guy is such a douche’
    • ‘I'm sorry it's so tiresome to hear me ask people not to feed these trolls or if you think it's obsessive for me to ban people who call me a douche twenty times a day, but that's tough.’
    • ‘Look, I know you think I'm just being a douche, but that's totally not true.’
    • ‘The guy's a total douche.’
    • ‘Someone should tell this douche about the 10 million single mothers in this country.’
    • ‘Dude, you don't really have to go out of your way to make sure we understand you're a douche.’
    • ‘But for me, you gotta love a macho gangster film where the female lead cold-cocks the male lead for being an aggressive douche and he staggers right across the room.’
    • ‘And thirty-five minutes later, we were still standing there like a couple of douches.’
    • ‘She's a whining douche who runs and hides when anybody says something she doesn't like.’
    • ‘I wish that douche would shut the hell up.’
    • ‘The Decoy also comes with a built-in removable Bluetooth earpiece, so you're less likely to lose your BT headphone and risk not looking like a douche.’
    • ‘That is why nobody buys music anymore, that is why people stop going to theaters and live concerts, because you people are just douches.’
    • ‘First off, Friend B (I shall not name names) has been more of a douche than usual.’
    • ‘I feel like a douche for not getting her anything yet.’
    • ‘Steve is a bit of a douche as well.’
    • ‘If you wife isn't a complete douche she should understand the economic impact to your mutual financial well being.’
    • ‘Here he is, the biggest douche in the universe.’
    • ‘It's tough to answer your question without coming off like a total douche.’
    • ‘The douche showed up on my door step after not talking to me for a month.’
    • ‘One day soon he will be confronted by a classmate on campus and he will be told emphatically: stop being such a douche.’
    • ‘One of the girls is nice to him, but her boyfriend is an arrogant douche.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Spray or shower with water:

    ‘she did not douche herself and the smell, at times, was off-putting’
    • ‘To use the rock or spray you douche the underarm and apply; it usually dries within a minute.’
    • ‘With a smirk, he had given her a bottle of solution, and had, in public, forced her to douche herself with it.’
    • ‘Li said that there had always been traditional wisdom and anecdotal evidence for sex selection methods, such as altering the pH level of vaginal fluids by douching the vagina with vinegar.’
    1. 1.1[no object] Use a douche as a method of contraception.
      • ‘A history should include obtaining information about the assault, including the use of a condom or lubricants, and whether the victim has eaten, washed, voided, defecated, bathed or douched since the contact.’
      • ‘But the reader is to presume here that this ad is taking place on Saturday or Sunday and that she hasn't douched in almost a week.’
      • ‘Taking 20 aspirin is just plain dumb, though not as dumb as douching with Coca-Cola - this stuff can corrode metal and you wanna squirt it where?’
      • ‘Also, in case anyone hadn't figured it out, douching with an acid after unprotected sex will not kill all the sperm and prevent a woman from becoming pregnant.’
      • ‘Would it be somehow better if I were one of these chicks that thought that douching with Coke would keep you from getting pregnant?’
      • ‘Two studies of patients attending family planning clinics in Texas found the overall rates of douching to be 70 percent, with 51 percent of women douching at least once a week.’
      • ‘But the only study we've seen had women eat yogurt instead of douching with it.’
      • ‘Some physicians recommend that patients douche with dilute vinegar or hydrogen peroxide for relief. [4,10]’
      • ‘Your doctor may or may not have you douche as well.’
      • ‘I was told when I was growing up that you should douche right after intercourse.’
      • ‘Wash or change your clothes, bathe or douche or rinse your mouth, as this can destroy evidence or indication of the act.’
      • ‘Yet we douche, wash, scrub, powder and spray in an effort to rid ourselves of our own scent.’
      • ‘Do girls need to douche or use deodorant spray when they have their periods?’

Origin

Mid 18th century (as a noun): via French from Italian doccia conduit pipe, from docciare pour by drops, based on Latin ductus leading (see duct).

Pronunciation:

douche

/duːʃ/