Definition of doublespeak in English:

doublespeak

noun

mass noun
  • Deliberately euphemistic, ambiguous, or obscure language.

    ‘the art of political doublespeak’
    • ‘It's fitting that in speaking her mind on behalf of her constituents, she stays away from the convoluted doublespeak that passes for political rhetoric these days and, instead, calls'em like she sees'em.’
    • ‘By contrast, doublespeak is dishonest and dangerous.’
    • ‘Unless the risk is defined it is political doublespeak.’
    • ‘We need candidates armed with insight, not condescending doublespeak.’
    • ‘The political season is always a prime opportunity to hear new examples of doublespeak - the use of language to make lies seem truthful.’
    • ‘That guy has doublespeak down to an art form, like really good poetry.’
    • ‘The timing could be a mere coincidence; it could also be plain doublespeak.’
    • ‘His oratory and intellectual robustness a breath of fresh air from the political doublespeak that obscures the core issues of the conflict.’
    • ‘What a heartening response without any of the standard political doublespeak.’
    • ‘The doublespeak is evident in that it's all coined in words of freedom.’
    • ‘Don't let all the double taxation doublespeak make you doubt that for one minute.’
    • ‘Hence, if my article was intended as doublespeak, the foregoing is my apology.’
    • ‘The electorate is not susceptible to such doublespeak.’
    • ‘Instead, he retreated behind the refuge of denial and doublespeak.’
    • ‘He seems to prefer candor to contention, honest talk to doublespeak.’
    • ‘The Commission liked my theory well enough to bury it in political doublespeak and jargon and call it their own.’
    • ‘The desire to disable corporate jargon and political doublespeak is a mission that Mullen shares with the Language Poets, but that is not the only area of expression that focuses her interest.’
    • ‘His witty sarcasm has been replaced by the still-ironic but much less amusing regime of menacing doublespeak.’
    • ‘He lacks one of the basic political skills: the art of doublespeak.’
    • ‘At best doublespeak makes language sound messy and vague; at worst it makes lies sound like truth.’
    prevarication, vagueness, qualification, ambiguity, uncertainty, ambivalence, indecision, doubt
    View synonyms

Origin

1950s: often attributed incorrectly to George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Pronunciation

doublespeak

/ˈdʌb(ə)lspiːk/