Main definitions of dory in English

: dory1dory2

dory1

noun

  • A narrow deep-bodied fish with a mouth that can be opened very wide.

    • ‘For mains, I had chosen the pan-fried stuffed chicken breast, while Madame went for the poached dory fillet on ratatouille Nicoise.’
    • ‘The price for top grade fish like monk and dory is down considerably.’
    • ‘Also found in the deep sea are the most valuable species of orange roughy, alfonsino and oreo dories.’
    • ‘This is a wildly successful business where the staff dispense dory and deep and meaningful advice in equal quantities.’
    • ‘The baitfish tightened into a ball as the kingfish attacked, while several snapper and dory moved in hoping to share the spoils.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French dorée, feminine past participle of dorer gild, from late Latin deaurare gild over, based on Latin aurum gold. Compare with dorado.

Pronunciation:

dory

/ˈdɔːri/

Main definitions of dory in English

: dory1dory2

dory2

noun

  • A small flat-bottomed rowing boat with a high bow and stern, originally of a kind used for fishing in New England.

    • ‘The rowing contingent went first, led by four venerable Banks dories, the traditional high-ended, flat-bottomed boats emblematic of Yankee seafaring.’
    • ‘All that day and all the day following, Port Haven was scoured from top to bottom, from the smallest closet to the tiniest dockside dory.’
    • ‘You can see it in the way the boatmen fret over their dories: spit-polishing microscopic scratches on the hulls, glowering when passengers track dirt onto the decks.’
    • ‘It has run dories and oar boats in the canyon since 1964.’
    • ‘He gets in two good strokes, lining up the dory.’
    • ‘Whether you navigate it in a rubber raft or a dory, the 225 miles of river can be alternately easy and terrifying.’
    • ‘Each day the men went out in the dories and fished the reef.’
    • ‘They'll kayak the waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and, as a tribute to the host province, paddle a traditional wooden dory row boat.’
    • ‘Training is done in a fleet of five dories with outboard motors, with a similar number awaiting work to bring them back into service.’
    • ‘A commercial line-fishing boat might have a crew of four men and a couple of dinghies or dories.’
    • ‘Late fishermen were pushing boats into the misty coastal waters as more dories dotting the shallow bay pulled in nets.’
    • ‘In truth, Newport Beach has always drawn a diverse population of sailing enthusiasts and dory fishermen, Gatsby wannabes and dedicated surfers, limo owners and beach-cruiser pedalers.’
    • ‘Far more satisfying, however, was picking off the slower vessels that had started before us: the lumbering dories, skiffs, and wherries.’
    • ‘Hand-made by an artisanal boat-maker in Maine, it is a child-sized replica of the wooden dories found on the shores of Maine.’
    • ‘Since 1867 upwards of one hundred and fifty of these boats and twenty dories have been built on the island.’
    • ‘The central compound of parliamentary buildings has been compared to the forms of a cluster of overturned, beached fishing dories.’
    • ‘Why, you'd have an easier time piloting your dory around the reflecting pool at the Legislature.’
    • ‘The guides lash the dories and rafts together and, with help from an outboard, begin motoring toward the gates.’
    • ‘There are the most traditional crafts: dories, shells, and plain old rowboats, designed for rough surf.’
    • ‘One large boat tried to run over the small dory I was in.’

Origin

Early 18th century: perhaps from Miskito dóri dugout.

Pronunciation:

dory

/ˈdɔːri/