Definition of dooryard in English:



North American
  • A yard or garden by the door of a house.

    • ‘Sometime later the boy would take the team of horses or oxen and begin to draw the wood up into the broad dooryard.’
    • ‘And at last the owner men drove into the dooryards and sat in their cars to talk out of the windows.’
    • ‘He'd already started moving off, calling behind him, ‘That wagon's pulling into the dooryard.’’
    • ‘Just as she finished setting the last stitches, she heard his footsteps in the dooryard.’
    • ‘Although on the main road the sun was shining brightly, under the trees the dooryards of the small houses were only dimly lit.’
    • ‘I saw it over and over again, blooming bravely in dooryard gardens despite the sizzling heat on the rough, wind-swept prairies.’
    • ‘We buried them just beyond the dooryard garden, on the lee side of the house from the chicken coops.’
    • ‘The foothills were covered with white-flowering bogote trees, and rioting bougainvillea edged the dooryards of the sparse villages.’
    • ‘The younger one hopped in and they drove back up to the dooryard.’
    • ‘Others rallied to him, and a fierce fight took place in the dooryard of the house.’
    • ‘Then she saw movement just in the corner of the dooryard.’
    • ‘Our lives have changed completely from one chance conversation in our dooryard.’
    • ‘I pushed open the little gate and walked into the dooryard with the neatly mown grass bordered by lilacs and peonies and day lilies…’
    • ‘Another good dooryard repellent plant could be catnip.’
    • ‘She drove up the small drive into her own dooryard.’
    • ‘They clear up the dishes in the kitchen while the rest of the family is out in the dooryard.’
    • ‘New Englanders saved weaving drafts written on the back of old letters, handmade dye books, and yarn reels carved in some farmer's dooryard.’
    • ‘She was setting up the radio when she saw the white truck pull into her dooryard a ways away.’
    • ‘The next morning, she was looking through the garden when she saw a familiar white truck round the corner of her drive and pull into her dooryard.’
    • ‘He dropped her off at her dooryard and drove off.’