Definition of doomsday in English:

doomsday

noun

  • 1The last day of the world's existence.

    ‘Bede believed that the time of doomsday is concealed from mankind’
    • ‘That it will probably never work is one of those silly technicalities that shouldn't stand in the way of us investing our time and resources in something that we want to believe will protect us from doomsday.’
    • ‘‘Greetings from the Nevada Test Site,’ it proclaimed, showing a collage of doomsday clouds floating above a scraggly desert.’
    • ‘But those doomsdays were the product of faith; reason always used to say the world will continue.’
    • ‘Global warming, they have been telling us for years, will prove to be man's undoing, man creating his own doomsday.’
    • ‘It was like doomsday, rendering the local populace helpless as the tsunami leveled both regions' coastal areas in only ten minutes.’
    • ‘I mean, it would have been doomsday if that happened.’
    • ‘But as people have said in the past, there are a lot of teenagers out there who have talked about such things, about doomsday, and they don't carry it out.’
    • ‘Don't doomsday and alarmist theories need evidence to support their tenability, also?’
    • ‘So in the last seven years, doomsday has been pushed back at least 13 years.’
    • ‘But the media portrayal of its collapse will suggest doomsday is upon us, and to the extent that we typically consult the media today more than ourselves or our neighbours, we are likely to be swept up in the breathless alarm.’
    • ‘Behind these constant rehearsals for doomsday lies a deep paranoia.’
    • ‘And if this situation is allowed to continue, it won't be long before the aggressive human species are the only creatures on the planet and surely that will be the doomsday of planet Earth.’
    • ‘It is happening on some celebrity talk shows and it could be doomsday for channels in the long run.’
    • ‘Even for the urban couch potatoes addicted to the remote, this might not be doomsday.’
    • ‘The only thing that is ‘inevitable’ is that these preparations for doomsday will waste our time and scare us witless.’
    • ‘You wouldn't expect scientists to agree on how and when doomsday will come, especially when the earth is still a mystery.’
    • ‘Ten years later he refined his vision with the gloomily satirical sequel, set almost entirely in a shopping mall the day after doomsday, with zombies as the ultimate docile consumers.’
    • ‘But for those in favour of retaining the current playing season - they are in the majority at present - the return of a winter schedule of matches would be equivalent to doomsday.’
    • ‘Yet, there are people who argue as if doomsday is near at hand when they confront evidence of such increase.’
    • ‘And if that's the case then the scare stories will be just another doomsday that didn't dawn.’
    1. 1.1 (in religious belief) the day of the Last Judgement.
      • ‘Many will see the Asian disaster as portending the advent of doomsday.’
      • ‘It is doubtful at this time that anyone who saw the image simply ignored it, since it resembled a rip or a tear strongly enough to cause predictions of doomsday from every church in the city.’
      • ‘Twain sometimes thought of himself as a modern Noah warning of a doomsday to come.’
      • ‘Here was something with an appropriately apocalyptic, doomsday flavour.’
      • ‘Since none of the religious leaders seemed impressed by John's ministry, he had dismissed him as a lunatic, just another doomsday prophet, here today and gone tomorrow.’
      • ‘After the first long sermon preaches a doomsday envisionment of religion, where a vindictive God has nothing but wrath for sinners, he is sure that every word was aimed at him.’
      • ‘The opening passage of a thousand-year-old Christian prayer book discovered in Ireland does not say that doomsday is near.’
      • ‘Many of them lead to mass suicides of some kind with members killing themselves based on their doomsday beliefs.’
      • ‘She would go to heaven on doomsday, so therefore why not merry?’
      • ‘It's the apocalypse, the cataclysm, doomsday, the big firework!’
    2. 1.2 A time or event of crisis or great danger.
      as modifier ‘in all the concern over greenhouse warming, one doomsday scenario stands out’
      • ‘The possibility of a doomsday scenario is once again on everyone's mind.’
      • ‘Around the world, investors were terrified of a doomsday scenario.’
      • ‘Even some US writers forecast a potential economic doomsday if current trends continue too long.’
      • ‘Someone said the same thing was happening in New York and Chicago in a pan-American doomsday.’
      • ‘In the latter case, he warned, a doomsday scenario is likely to follow.’
      • ‘The third doomsday scenario is based on pollution.’
      • ‘Port managers are working feverishly to prevent a dockside doomsday.’
      • ‘It's the economic doomsday scenario, inflation at four per cent and interest rates at 6.5 per cent by the end of next year.’
      • ‘And some lawmakers are calling it a pure doomsday scenario.’
      • ‘People feel their confidence boosted by that event; it's the experience of hearing a doomsday scenario and finding out it wasn't so bad.’
      • ‘This conclusion was based on ‘information developed’ that the next doomsday would be within a week.’
      • ‘I'm not really sure how he moves from that point to the doomsday scenario he describes, however.’
      • ‘Congress is preparing for a doomsday scenario.’
      • ‘A newly discovered asteroid has zero chance of colliding with Earth in 11 years, although preliminary data had suggested such a doomsday scenario was possible, astronomers said this week.’
      • ‘Recent reports that up to 30,000 jobs could be under threat in the tourism sector in the North West region have been described as being ‘akin to a doomsday scenario’.’
      • ‘He further contended that this talk of 20,000 extra vehicles was only in the event of a doomsday scenario and was not practical.’
      • ‘Thus, the estimated 100,000 mainland visitors on National Day will spell doomsday.’
      • ‘The saner elements are likely to sulk and the economists are bound to predict doomsday.’
      • ‘We won't see big gains for years to come, but perhaps the imbalances we've discussed won't lead to an economic doomsday either.’
      • ‘However, I must question whether the doomsday scenario painted by you and some fellow diarists is at all credible.’

Phrases

  • till doomsday

    • informal Forever.

      ‘we'll be here till doomsday if you go blethering on’
      • ‘The frame is adjustable, and made to last until doomsday.’
      • ‘If you reply to him, you will get another ‘nice’ letter and another and another, until doomsday or until he figures out your address and shows up on your doorstep.’
      • ‘A golfer can visualize hitting a hole-in-one from now until doomsday without it ever happening.’
      • ‘We may sing songs about the sweet by and by, preach sermons and say prayers until doomsday, and he will never concern himself about us, if we don't wake anybody up.’
      • ‘But I mean, again, we could be speculating from now until doomsday, but there are people who know and it would be appropriate for them to reveal to the world what's going on.’

Origin

Old English dōmes dæg (see doom, day).

Pronunciation

doomsday

/ˈduːmzdeɪ/