Definition of doom in English:

doom

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Death, destruction, or some other terrible fate:

    ‘the aircraft was sent crashing to its doom in the water’
    • ‘The film rumbles along, an ominous sense of marital doom hanging over the entire affair.’
    • ‘They knew only one thing: It foretold their doom.’
    • ‘However, its inevitable collapse spelled doom for the many colonies that were dependent on it.’
    • ‘If she does not, the ancient prophecies foretell doom and destruction over all the earth.’
    • ‘Elm tree shadows crept across the street and spelled doom for my project.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, everyone she films with her cursed camera meets an untimely doom.’
    • ‘So the prophets are split neatly between impending economic doom and postponed blight.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, their votes spell certain doom for other countries, other innocent people.’
    • ‘She was filled with a sickly sense of fear and the realization that she was facing her own imminent doom.’
    • ‘There is one state that is an infallible indicator of imminent doom: suffering.’
    • ‘Why are they looking at me as if this dream spells impending doom?’
    • ‘The rat squeals and fights, sensing it may be headed to its doom.’
    • ‘Many economists are predicting doom and gloom in the times ahead but racing has never been stronger.’
    • ‘Dust filled the air as one by one the vampires met their doom.’
    • ‘She didn't want to turn evil and hand the world to its doom.’
    • ‘Transformation as currently practiced carries an appreciable risk of ultimate doom.’
    • ‘Since the real world is more frightening than the void, thoughts turn to impending doom, death and suicide.’
    • ‘There is a longstanding feeling of doom hanging over the offense.’
    • ‘I have to work today with this feeling of impending doom hanging over me.’
    • ‘For most teams, the loss of their star player would spell almost certain doom.’
    destruction, downfall, grim fate, terrible fate, ruin, ruination, rack and ruin, catastrophe, disaster
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic [in singular] (in Christian belief) the Last Judgement:
      ‘a day like that of the last doom’
      See also crack of doom at crack
      • ‘Cursed by Eve, rejected by Adam, and marked on the brow by an angel of the Lord, Cain sets forth into exile with his wife and children, knowing that they will further the doom of mankind.’
      • ‘According to this story, he promised her that if her desire is not fulfilled after this practice, she can catch hold of him at the doom's day.’
      • ‘Such will be their degradation in the world, and in the Hereafter theirs will be an awful doom.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Condemn to certain death or destruction:

    ‘fuel was spilling out of the damaged wing and the aircraft was doomed’
    • ‘With the constant drug-taking the marriage was doomed and it lasted just 14 months.’
    • ‘Mike hardly ever looks at girls, and when he does, the relationship is doomed from the start.’
    • ‘However, a star does not have to appear doomed for their death to increase or alter their value.’
    • ‘But all we really see is that the couple was doomed from the get-go.’
    • ‘Failure to satisfy both components dooms the program.’
    • ‘I can tell you, some Republicans privately saying they think this dooms his potential presidential chances in 2008.’
    • ‘I am part of that menacing statistic that essentially dooms love from the very beginning.’
    • ‘Illicit romance dooms the characters, bringing them closer to death and destruction than ever before and cementing their maturity - or lack thereof - permanently.’
    • ‘Querulousness, arrogance and an erratic streak alienated even his closest supporters, dooming his place in history.’
    • ‘Despite being financially doomed from the beginning, the promoters never let the party stop.’
    • ‘Their brief marriage was clearly doomed from the start by her parents' snobbish condescension.’
    • ‘I realize that the relationship is inevitably doomed.’
    • ‘The contact caused a small crack in the wing, allowing hot gas to seep in on re-entry, destroying the wing and dooming the crew.’
    • ‘From my vantage point, I quickly came to the conclusion that bad journalism was dooming the business of Internet content.’
    • ‘Moreover, the way the authorities went about reform helped to doom their efforts.’
    • ‘Though the number of speakers declined again in the 1990s, there is nothing intrinsic in the nature of the language or its circumstances that dooms it.’
    • ‘What made it useful in an earlier world is dooming it in this one.’
    • ‘But the project was doomed from the very outset.’
    • ‘If she said yes, she was cursed and doomed for eternity.’
    • ‘But no, releasing this wasp out into the cold would doom it for sure, and I'm feeling too much cabin-fever kinship with her.’
    1. 1.1 Cause to have an unfortunate and inescapable outcome:
      ‘her plan was doomed to failure’
      • ‘All we all doomed to repeat the same mistakes as our mothers?’
      • ‘They're firmly locked into delusion, and are doomed to live there forever.’
      • ‘It inevitably dooms itself to calamities that must strike it dead.’
      • ‘Most of these duplicated segments are doomed to oblivion, because any proteins their genes produce are redundant.’
      • ‘When I was doomed to live in despair, he saved me!’
      • ‘Failing to recognize the dark side of humanity dooms us to repeat those failings.’
      • ‘If we don't allow any quality commercial development then the town is doomed to a mediocre fate.’
      • ‘Perhaps the promoter may have been able to do something, but the truth is, it's the lack of venues that are dooming our live acts to cancelling and moving to venues that half the audience can't enter.’
      • ‘He was going only out of a sense of obligation to an already doomed relationship.’
      • ‘Is the field of canine cognition doomed forever to repeat this seemingly endless dispute?’
      • ‘To ignore the current situation would certainly doom the denomination to an untimely death.’
      • ‘Alas, the reader - sophisticated or otherwise - is doomed to disappointment.’
      • ‘If you go by what the experts and data crunchers say, the worker bees of the world are dooming the civilized, unhurried meal to an untimely death.’
      • ‘Looking for a history that isn't there, these hand-wringing malcontents are doomed to disappointment.’
      • ‘The workers held out for three days, but they were doomed to defeat.’
      • ‘Is my slothful old age doomed to gloomy obscurity?’
      • ‘Maybe it was always doomed to be a lost cause.’
      • ‘Some of us avoid that painful process by diving straight into a new relationship, dooming ourselves to an endlessly repeating pattern of failure, while others remain shattered by the experience for years to come.’
      • ‘Otherwise he will be forever doomed to be the victim of his own erudition.’
      • ‘To start a project and then determine you or your staff is not able to commit the time needed will doom your project to sure failure.’
      destine, fate, predestine, ordain, preordain, foredoom, mean, foreordain, consign
      condemn, sentence
      certain, sure, bound, guaranteed, assured, very likely
      ill-fated, ill-starred, ill-omened, star-crossed, under a curse, cursed, jinxed, foredoomed, hapless, damned, bedevilled, luckless, unlucky
      fey
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • doom and gloom

    • A general feeling of pessimism or despondency:

      ‘the national feeling of doom and gloom’
      • ‘This is not only good news but encouraging revelations, especially made at the beginning of the year when projections are usually about gloom and doom.’
      • ‘Those who predicted doom and gloom at the start of the campaign will no doubt be feeling rather smug.’
      • ‘So the tabloid-style gloom and doom may simply be disinformation.’
      • ‘The one good thing about all this gloom and doom, I thought to myself, is that it would be highly unlikely that my neighbor's gardeners would appear on a day like this.’
      • ‘Is there any good news among all this gloom and doom?’
      • ‘It's a miraculous way to yank yourself out of gloom and doom.’
      • ‘‘It's not all gloom and doom,’ he says, with a twinkle in his eye.’
      • ‘Look, it wasn't all gloom and doom, but like I said - it was getting old.’
      • ‘Nobody is forecasting gloom and doom here, but we are facing challenging times that if not dealt with have serious implications for the entire world.’
      • ‘While commentators have been casting gloom and doom on the prospects for their opponents, I think every party involved in this election will have some degree of satisfaction.’
      defeatism, negative thinking, negativity, expecting the worst, doom and gloom, gloom, gloominess
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English dōm ‘statute, judgement’, of Germanic origin, from a base meaning to put in place; related to do.

Pronunciation

doom

/duːm/