Definition of doof in English:

doof

noun

Australian
  • 1mass noun Electronic music with a repetitive, heavy bass beat.

    ‘they join in the workshops, eat felafel, and dance to doof’
    • ‘Music has been dead for years, and it wasn't the Internet that killed it—it was techno doof and the morons that like it.’
    • ‘I guess street cred is multiplied when you have all four windows down on a cold night, with your front seats reclined, wearing a baseball cap, listening to doof, with neons blazing.’
    • ‘Our doof is all done with traditional instruments like guitar, bass, and drums.’
    • ‘The independent music scene encompasses everything from garage rock to hardcore doof.’
    • ‘Because we're all here for the same reason, doof, doof, dance, dance, dance your heart out.’
    • ‘It has grown from a little station, that had a reputation as just being about doof and lattes, into one of the greatest little powerhouses of new music.’
    • ‘He's a 19-year-old DJ and doof enthusiast from Victoria.’
    • ‘This is someone playing doof on Guitar Hero—freakin' awesome!’
    • ‘Special guest on the night is a local band who will play a set of high-energy dance and doof grooves to suit the mood.’
    • ‘The customers seem to like it when I play doof on a Saturday night.’
    1. 1.1count noun A large party or festival with dancing to electronic music.
      ‘the park provides the perfect venue for a doof’
      as modifier ‘they were no strangers to the doof scene’
      • ‘They'll have the rare opportunity to dance into the wee hours of the morning without going to an out-of-town doof.’
      • ‘A lot of the people who go to doof parties would claim to be environmentally aware.’
      • ‘The friendly, alternative venue provides the perfect place for a doof, so make sure you don't miss out.’
      • ‘Access to the beach was closed due to damage incurred from doof parties staged there over the New Year period.’
      • ‘A bush doof music festival for Central Oz—google it, baby!’
      • ‘Further down the street was the kiddie doof, featuring walls of speakers and stalls where 13-year-old girls offered free glitter makeovers to a banging electronic soundtrack.’
      • ‘The damage apparently occurred at two dance parties, including an all-night doof which attracted more than 1,000 people.’
      • ‘They are beloved by cool kids, club kids, and the doof scene alike.’
      • ‘The village had a main doof and two chill spaces.’
      • ‘Live dance music returns with a new event aimed at people who love the local doof scene.’

Origin

1990s: an onomatopoeic coinage suggestive of the repetitive, heavy bass beat of electronic music.

Pronunciation

doof

/duːf/