Definition of doodad in English:



  • North American term for doodah
    • ‘I have one of those insurance thingy doodads so that if one of my kitchen appliances throws a dicky-fit then someone comes out and fixes it.’
    • ‘I love the conflicting ‘expert’ opinions on what the doodad actually is.’
    • ‘There are few retail environments with more to store than a frame shop, with its equipment, artwork, materials and countless tools and doodads.’
    • ‘Consider how many little doodads dangle from the cellphone of a stereotypical schoolgirl.’
    • ‘The human brain is a complex organ, filled with many widgets and doodads that all have to be firing all the time for everything work right.’
    • ‘I'm guessing the card holder is so that you can maintain professionalism in the office by having a misogynist doodad to pluck your business cards from.’
    • ‘I am aware that there is a problem with the border on the bottom of the slideout doodads…’
    • ‘An ancient Russian weather satellite has worn out and will plummet Earthward unless its out-moded equipment and doodads are repaired sufficiently to send the bird in the direction of infinity.’
    • ‘The hum of these newfangled doodads drowns out any conversation in the house.’
    • ‘I think what has really cemented it is the large selection of after-market add-ons and doodads available for the thing.’
    • ‘There are so very many features, thingies and doodads that it sometimes feels like you need a Michelin guide to find your way around.’
    • ‘Waterproof watches with smiles that look like they really smile, compasses and doodads aplenty adorn watches these days.’
    • ‘Give people a reason to respond - 10% off in the next 24 hours for example, or a free doodad or thingamabob.’
    • ‘He lead me off into their vast collection of dohickeys, doodads, and thingamajigs.’
    • ‘They lugged in the shelves, all the knick knacks and doodads, and started setting up.’
    • ‘He admits that he's a novice and asks us to bear with him as he gets the hang of his new doodads.’
    • ‘The slide projector advances to a picture of the doodad.’


Early 20th century: of unknown origin.