Definition of dominie in English:

dominie

noun

  • 1Scottish A schoolmaster.

    • ‘‘I've not taught in a school since 1969,’ he told him, ever sensitive to accusations that his leadership style reflected too much of the dominie.’
    • ‘When she learns that he has been secretly having an affair with the tutor she joins her in attempting to oust the hapless dominie.’
    • ‘It is a sound reaching back to the farthest recesses of his throat, to an Etonian schooling in the late 1940s, and to classroom discipline as a Bo'ness Academy dominie in the late 1950s.’
    • ‘There is a rather nervous disclaimer aimed at dominies who suffer from a humour bypass.’
    • ‘By over-professionalising we exclude mature folk whose experience would make them better dominies in a typical housing estate than a young graduate.’
    educator, tutor, instructor, pedagogue, schoolteacher, schoolmaster, schoolmistress, master, mistress, governess, educationalist, educationist
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  • 2US A pastor or clergyman.

    clergyman, clergywoman, priest, churchman, churchwoman, man of the cloth, woman of the cloth, man of god, woman of god, cleric, minister, preacher, chaplain, father
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Origin

Late 17th century: alteration of Latin domine! (vocative) ‘master!, sir!’, from dominus lord (formerly used as a polite form of address to a clergyman or member of one of the professions).

Pronunciation:

dominie

/ˈdɒmɪni/