Definition of dog in English:



  • 1A domesticated carnivorous mammal that typically has a long snout, an acute sense of smell, non-retractile claws, and a barking, howling, or whining voice.

    • ‘She heard a car door shut and a muffled voice calming the dog who now went from barking to a whine.’
    • ‘People let their dogs foul in public places and leave it for somebody else to worry about.’
    • ‘He said, ‘It's kind of like a hound dog chasing a rabbit.’’
    • ‘I think it's okay to keep pet dogs on a leash and birds in a cage.’
    • ‘‘All dogs have an intense sense of smell, and every dog likes to sniff,’ Smith said.’
    • ‘Secondly, rabid stray dogs do not observe boundaries.’
    • ‘The top five dogs of each breed are invited to attend.’
    • ‘Her size makes it impractical to use her as a patrol dog, but her sense of smell is so keen she can detect even trace amounts of drugs.’
    • ‘A woman in Hastings is walking a small dog on a leash.’
    • ‘The sun shone, people were walking the dog, airing the child, spring cleaning their souls.’
    • ‘Don't overlook books and videos on training hunting dogs.’
    • ‘Mr. Mason's hunting dogs weren't barking their heads off for once, which was new.’
    • ‘However, there have been several instances where citizens have been bitten by stray dogs.’
    • ‘The neighbor's dog barked relentlessly, giving the night a heartbeat to add to his own.’
    • ‘The enamel carried a scene of hunting dogs chasing a hare.’
    • ‘Domesticated dogs arose from wolves that somehow became accustomed to living among people.’
    • ‘He could almost feel them out there; it was time to call the dogs to heel.’
    • ‘Her attack dog is a mutt, and, as everyone knows, mongrels are healthier than pedigreed dogs.’
    hound, canine, mongrel, cur, tyke
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A wild animal of the dog family.
      • ‘In most mammals, adult play is rare, but it is common in dolphins, members of the dog family, great apes and, of course, humans.’
      • ‘The thing is Robyn we've got the numbers here and as you said it's quite a large proportion if you like of Wild African dogs in captivity in Australia.’
      • ‘In this matter of going, readily do dogs, jackals and the like, know when they move on that they are moving.’
      • ‘Among dogs, the family that preys together stays together.’
      • ‘We watched the wild cats and dogs frolicking in the winter sunlight.’
      • ‘Last night I watched a documentary on the Golden Jackals of Africa - dogs nearly identical to Jasper.’
      • ‘To all dog owners, the call goes out, keep you dogs under control day and night, as the lambing season is upon us now and many have been savaged by roaming dogs in some areas already.’
      • ‘Teufel-hunden were originally known as the wild, ferocious mountain dogs of Bavarian folklore.’
    2. 1.2The male of an animal of the dog family, or of some other mammals such as the otter.
      [as modifier] ‘a dog fox’
      • ‘A member of the waterworks department shot a fine dog otter on the lower Rivington reservoir.’
      • ‘The big dog otter probably got as much of a fright as he did, it about-turned and leapt into the water.’
      • ‘The male dog otter measured 41.5 inches in length with a girth of 26 inches.’
      • ‘In the Landrover in which I was travelling was a large dog fox.’
      • ‘A male, or dog, otter can range over six to eight miles, far further than a female.’
      • ‘‘I am looking for a young animal, either a dog or a bitch, that has a bit of attitude,’ he said.’
      • ‘It is obvious therefore that not only pregnant and nursing vixens are killed, but also the dog fox, on whom the vixen and cubs often rely for food.’
      • ‘As I made my way back to my car, a dog fox trotted across the road in front of me, stopped, looked me up and down and then carried on, completely unconcerned.’
      • ‘With his hair tinged by the sun's rays, he looked like a dog fox who'd out-witted his pursuers once again.’
    3. 1.3British informal Greyhound racing.
      ‘a night at the dogs’
      • ‘People went to football in the afternoon, went to the dogs in the evening and took the train home.’
  • 2informal An unpleasant, contemptible, or wicked man.

    ‘he was interrupted by cries of ‘dirty dog!’’
    ‘come out, Michael, you dog!’
    • ‘By the way, you can keep the pun you wretched journalistic dogs.’
    1. 2.1dated [with adjective]Used to refer to a person of a specified kind in a tone of playful reproof, commiseration, or congratulation.
      ‘your historian is a dull dog’
      ‘you lucky dog!’
      • ‘It's true - I'm a lucky dog.’
      • ‘He got up with his hand wrapped around her little waist… that lucky dog!’
      • ‘I thought My God, if all the scenes are as scary as this one; I'm really a lucky dog.’
      • ‘There's not much more to be said about it other than she's a lucky dog.’
      • ‘If that next race is the bottom of the new grade, this lucky dog might have a chance of stumbling into the money again.’
      fellow, individual, character, wretch, beggar, soul
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2Used to refer to someone who is abject or miserable, especially because they have been treated harshly.
      ‘I make him work like a dog’
      ‘Rab was treated like a dog’
      • ‘He continued by declaring, ‘the dictator must die like a dog, because he deserves it.’’
      • ‘Do you think this helps explain why today's corporate bosses are treating American workers like dogs?’
      • ‘In order to get him to commit you have to treat him like a dog.’
      • ‘They were treated as dogs, they were hungry, and the goddess of justice refused to review their plight.’
      • ‘Jackie loved my father and my father treated him like a dog.’
      • ‘During the Second World War, he treated Sinclair like a dog.’
      • ‘The actor plays a guy who is sort of - he's treated like a dog by this gangster, his master.’
      • ‘‘To say that they treated Victoria like a dog would be wholly unfair,’ he said.’
      • ‘She talked about the prisoners being treated like dogs by the general.’
      • ‘I was already treated worse than a dog, letting her see me shed tears, only gave her more opportunities to despise me.’
      • ‘Well if I hired my old headmaster, I'd treat him like a dog.’
      • ‘The schools are good so there's no need to work like a dog to pay school fees.’
      • ‘Why the hell did these cops treat me like a dog in the street?’
      • ‘Those people put their lives up for this country - and for them - and they are being forced out into the gutter and being treated like dogs.’
      • ‘The fact is that Addis was not treated like a dog.’
      • ‘I say it's cruel for us to be treated like dogs in here.’
      • ‘The poor Prime Minister, the dog hasn't even got a bone to show for his efforts.’
      • ‘I can work like a dog when I have to; as long as my energy is directed at the race car, I can be fairly competitive.’
      • ‘Tash had enough self-respect to dislike being treated like a stray dog.’
      • ‘It was appalling to see those broken bodies, human beings treated worse than dogs.’
    3. 2.3offensive An unattractive woman.
    4. 2.4Australian, NZ An informer or traitor.
      ‘one day she's going to turn dog on you’
    5. 2.5North American A thing of poor quality.
      ‘a dog of a film’
      • ‘Sounds like a real dog of a human being to have to deal with.’
      • ‘Through the select committee process we changed what had been a dog of a bill into a much-improved bill.’
      • ‘There is also an ugly betrayal of Cammie's trust, and, as befits a dog of a play, a shaggy-dog ending.’
      • ‘Never a truer word as, after a dog of a first half, the second period ran rampant on the back of abject defending.’
      • ‘That's why we try to write articles about how to crush on a cutie, find a BF and, yikes, get rid of a dog of a dude before he turns your heart into a pancake.’
      • ‘It is a dog of a day, relentless rain and biting cold fraying the nerve ends of men who like to be in perpetual motion.’
      • ‘It's been a dog of a market in the past few months compared with the rest of Asia, but we are still overweight there.’
      • ‘One of the great mysteries of Australian political life is why a man who is about to dump a dog of a tax system on an unsuspecting public should appear so smug?’
      • ‘If he understands that it's a dog of a deal, why do you think he'd consider supporting it?’
      • ‘So how do you choose from the plethora of contracts on offer to ensure you don't get stuck with a dog of a contract?’
      • ‘The only question New Zealand First really wants to ask the Minister is why he came to the House for the first reading with such a dog of a bill.’
      • ‘I personally still think it is a dog of a deal but I am glad that he has taken the stand that he has.’
      • ‘With a lead clenched less than firmly in his sweaty palm, he then contrived to play a dog of a game in the middle of the second set.’
      • ‘Move too early, and you might end up backing a dog of a technology.’
    6. 2.6A horse that is slow or difficult to handle.
  • 3Used in names of dogfishes, e.g. sandy dog, spur-dog.

  • 4A mechanical device for gripping.

    • ‘The firm have been making grips for years and these dogs here felt so soft and comfortable.’
  • 5North American informal Feet.

    tootsie, trotter
    View synonyms
  • 6US Horse Racing
    Barriers used to keep horses off a particular part of the track.


  • 1Follow (someone) closely and persistently.

    ‘photographers seemed to dog her every step’
    • ‘Since Sally was the only member of the group who would acknowledge Yap's existence, the little gnome dogged her every step, chattering excitedly.’
    • ‘The riverborne portion of his annual journey was normally its safest part, but this year was different, for someone - or something - was dogging his heels.’
    • ‘The spurned woman shows up on the cruise as well, dogging the newlyweds' footsteps.’
    • ‘When Sampras was taking his first steps to greatness, he had a small gang of hopefuls dogging his footsteps.’
    • ‘Now, by Cavanaugh's estimate, 75 companies were dogging the buyer for the national store account.’
    • ‘That fellow is going to dog him to the gates of St Peters.’
    • ‘Whenever the Democrat arrives in the Midwestern state, he is dogged by a volunteer from the rival campaign dressed as a giant ear of corn.’
    • ‘Rumours that it may be bought by a private equity group or trade buyer or combination of the two have dogged Allen since the company's formation in 2004.’
    • ‘He is dogged by the determined trio of regional leaders, who want to grab as much from the largest pie as possible.’
    • ‘It was picture perfect: the sunshine, the breeze, the companionship… and of course, the annoyingly obnoxious group behind us dogging our heels.’
    • ‘Doyle hopes to prove his new pet theories on the existence of the supernatural, but when a murder takes place, his own drowned ghost reappears to dog him.’
    • ‘I mean, they seem to be dogging you throughout this entire investigation.’
    • ‘The senator complained that he was dogged all week by opponents of the White House plan who dominated news coverage.’
    • ‘Two NBC guys who have spent four months in the desert dogging the division confirmed that this was a very good thing for reporters who want to report on the action.’
    • ‘He laughs about how the police are still - and probably forever - on his tail, even dogging him on his recent US book tour.’
    • ‘Her mother dogged her heels, asking more about her day.’
    • ‘If something's upsetting her on the home front, she might be trying to get her moms attention - even if it means dogging her.’
    • ‘When you have a leader of his passion and effectiveness, you have a media that's very much tracking him and dogging him and trying to find what they can about him.’
    pursue, follow, stalk, track, trail, shadow, hound
    plague, beset, bedevil, assail, beleaguer, blight, trouble, torment, haunt
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a problem) cause continual trouble for.
      ‘the twenty-nine-year-old has constantly been dogged by controversy’
      • ‘These allegations are going to dog him on his final campaign bus tour and he didn't want that.’
      • ‘Shoals of words have been written about the problems dogging our fishing industry - a key generator of revenue.’
      • ‘Ever thereafter - following his trip to China in 1972 - he was dogged by the fear of assassination.’
      • ‘For the last 5-1/2 years this process has been dogged by problem after problem.’
      • ‘The school - which has a police officer stationed on site - has been on special measures for five years and has been dogged by problems.’
      • ‘A war that ended 30 years ago still dogs us shaping our debates about fighting an entirely different war.’
      • ‘Loneliness, grief and despair dogged her at every turn, seemed to follow always in her wake, just out of sight.’
      • ‘The system has been dogged with problems since it came on line in 1999.’
      • ‘And I'm concerned about making a bad first impression, because that could dog me for months.’
      • ‘Sadly, his retirement was dogged by health problems.’
      • ‘As for the criticism which has dogged him all season he replied that as long as the manager believed in him he was happy.’
      • ‘Although he was acquitted in 1991, the incident has dogged him ever since.’
      • ‘One tournament win doesn't inspire confidence but his play this week has been exceptional, a total contrast to the self-doubt that dogged him in recent times.’
      • ‘The trick, you see, is to put what's dogging you into the proper perspective.’
      • ‘But again and again, he was dogged by scandals of his own making that made him as much of an embarrassment as an asset to the party he served.’
      • ‘She said one of her hopes was complete recovery from the illness that has dogged her.’
      • ‘This criticism dogged him for his entire career.’
      • ‘It has dogged him all his life, and has, at different times, overwhelmed and almost broken him.’
      • ‘I have to admit that this issue has dogged me most of this week.’
      • ‘I'm looking for ways to tackle this constant state of feeling tired all the time, which has dogged me for years.’
      trouble, disturb, worry, plague, beset, torture, torment, rack, bedevil, nag, vex, harass, pester
      View synonyms
  • 2North American informal Act lazily; fail to try one's hardest.

    ‘Eric had a reputation for dogging it a little’
    • ‘Pavel led the league in goals for the second straight year with 59, even though he dogged it for long portions of the schedule.’
    • ‘There were more clashes with the coach after his trade to the Nuggets, including an accusation that he dogged it through his first season in Denver.’
    • ‘Maybe he has been dogging it all these months in hopes of getting a lot of attention and an extra ration of sympathy kibble.’
    • ‘I'd rather have the hassle for dogging it than put up with that.’
    • ‘The Americans actually were dogging it late in the third as the Germans led 67-65, but Pierce sank a 10-spot on their heads as a part of a 12-0 run to close the quarter.’
    • ‘He entered the season with a reputation for dogging it when he wasn't the primary receiver.’
    • ‘Inside the Ravens' building, the consensus is the running back is not dogging it.’
    • ‘His position coach already has said he expects more effort; and he knows folks in St. Louis still say he dogged it last year.’
    • ‘I know a lot of people made a big deal out of Jones in the national media, but believe me, he dogged it a lot and didn't seem real eager when he had the chance to run routes and line up at tight end.’
    • ‘But his effort indicated he certainly wasn't dogging it.’
    • ‘The disturbing thing is, they aren't even really trying here, and you can tell they're already dogging it a bit in favor of dull, formulaic jazzy folk that would later be their poison.’
    • ‘He loved the game and didn't mind ragging on the players when they were dogging it.’
    • ‘What sticks out is his Santa Claus ability to know who is working hard and who is dogging it.’
    • ‘He has dogged it by refusing to debate his ready opponent on the Seven Network this Sunday evening.’
  • 3Grip (something) with a mechanical device.

    [with object and complement] ‘she has dogged the door shut’
    • ‘She places the child inside the engineering space before stepping through herself and dogging the hatch behind her.’
    • ‘They reached a hatch and wasted no time in dogging it down behind them.’
    • ‘These leaks can sometimes be stopped, at opening ports, anyway, by dogging them down tighter.’
    • ‘Now, as he stood within the hyperbaric chamber of the minisub, he watched as Clark went about dogging the hatches.’
    • ‘There was a muted boom as the Captain closed and dogged the ships inner lock shut behind us.’
    • ‘If your maintainers open a hatch, be sure they dog it down.’
    • ‘Its convex shape and dogging mechanism made it look as though it were an enlarged part of a submarine, scavenged from some terrestrial scrap yard and grafted onto the bulkhead.’
    • ‘The hatch closed, they dogged it, and checked to make sure everyone was in the seats lining the walls.’
    • ‘She steps through, and closes the hatch, dogging it tightly.’


  • dog and bone

    • rhyming slang A telephone.

      • ‘Thus the trouble and strife would walk down the apples and pears and along the frog and toad to use the public dog and bone.’
      • ‘Ten minutes later he's on the dog and bone again.’
      • ‘We had little info on this brewery apart from a phone number, so we reached for the dog and bone and had a natter to the owner.’
      • ‘Burly Dad conducts his antique business in a cockney accent on the dog and bone.’
      telephone, mobile phone, mobile, cell phone, car phone, radio-telephone, cordless phone, videophone, extension
      View synonyms
  • dog eat dog

    • Used to refer to a situation of fierce competition in which people are willing to harm each other in order to succeed.

      ‘New York is a dog-eat-dog society’
      • ‘They say that in the corporate world it's dog eat dog.’
      • ‘It's dog eat dog in this division, as we've already seen.’
      • ‘So there's a harsh side to the real world of competition; where competition's fierce, it can be dog eat dog.’
      • ‘It's dog eat dog, the wonder of free market capitalism in its purest form.’
      • ‘‘It's the most dog eat dog market there is,’ he acknowledges.’
      • ‘It's a dog eat dog situation even in the law enforcers' world.’
      • ‘Labor was effective when it employed direct action against the capitalists, posed a principled and inspirational solidarity movement against the dog eat dog values of the obscenely rich.’
      • ‘‘It's very quiet, the standard is unbelievably high and it's dog eat dog,’ says Maguire.’
      • ‘It was a dog eat dog world, where everything was a competition.’
      • ‘It's a dog eat dog world out there and the young need the best qualifications they can get.’
      merciless, pitiless, cruel, heartless, hard-hearted, hard, stony-hearted, stony, with a heart of stone, cold-blooded, cold-hearted, harsh, callous, severe, unmerciful, unrelenting, unsparing, unforgiving, unfeeling, uncaring, unsympathetic, uncharitable, lacking compassion
      View synonyms
  • a dog's age

    • informal A very long time.

      ‘the best I've seen in a dog's age’
      • ‘Later that same Sunday, I went to the first major comix/sci-fi convention to come to Boston in a dog's age.’
      • ‘It was some of the funniest stuff I'd seen in a dog's age.’
      • ‘I'm going to have to stop uploading pictures to this site soon or the front page will take a dog's age to load.’
      • ‘So I've resolved to make use of my day by actually writing some of the stupid top-secret fiction thing which has been hanging albatross-like around my neck for a dog's age.’
      • ‘I'd known him for a dog's age but a little bit of Jer went a long way.’
      • ‘I was out running last-minute errands this afternoon and ran into a guy I used to work with who I haven't seen in a dog's age.’
      • ‘I haven't actually listened to his speech in a dog's age, but my recollection is that his phrasing actually went like this.’
      • ‘They are taking a dog's age to sort out getting me a tenant and as I passed the six-month anniversary of not living there any more I thought it was time to get someone else on the case.’
      • ‘If you've never seen them before, or haven't seen them in a dog's age, then check out that link.’
      • ‘You see, lead in high enough amounts is toxic to the extreme, not to mention fatal, which is why it hasn't been used in a dog's age.’
  • dogs bark, but the caravans move on

    • proverb People may make a fuss, but it won't change the situation.

  • the dog's bollocks

    • vulgar slang A person or thing that is the best of its kind.

  • a dog's dinner (or breakfast)

    • informal A poor piece of work; a mess.

      ‘we made a real dog's breakfast of it’
      • ‘In design terms it's a dog's breakfast, a grey, smudgy mess that seems to stagger off ancient presses each week.’
      • ‘It's an eyesore and looks like a dog's dinner of cheapo construction.’
      • ‘‘The presentation of the policy has been a dog's dinner,’ agreed the Sun.’
      • ‘All in all it is a dog's dinner, literally, with local residents living with the mess and hazard.’
      • ‘The edit interface itself is a bit of a dog's dinner.’
      • ‘Speaking after the council agreed to hold the ballot, he said: ‘The wording on the ballot papers is a dog's dinner.’’
      • ‘Mostly though you end up with a dumbed down dog's dinner - serious subject matter made ridiculous and facile.’
      • ‘Just look at the roll call of off-the-wall ‘humour’ imposed on us the last time this dog's dinner of a day came round in 2001.’
      • ‘It all adds up to a dog's breakfast of departmental rivalry, layer upon layer of confused delivery and strategic confusion.’
      • ‘‘The proposals are a half-baked dog's dinner,’ he said.’
  • a dog's life

    • An unhappy existence, full of problems or unfair treatment.

      ‘he led poor Amy a dog's life’
      • ‘Ah me, thought Clarence it's a dog's life and decided that on balance the thing to do was sleep.’
      • ‘Next time you are fed up with the world and say in disgust that it's a dog's life, think twice.’
      • ‘Selling wine is a dog's life, but some manage it with integrity’
      • ‘Face it, it's a dog's life having to raid the dressing-up box for a living.’
      • ‘And the man on street (literally and figuratively) has a dog's life.’
      • ‘He is leading a dog's life at the moment.’
      • ‘The self-evident fact that the numbers applying for asylum correlate precisely with countries where a dog's life would be a step up is of no account.’
      • ‘The payment of salaries is quite often irregular and it is a dog's life for the majority of labourers who go in search of a fortune across the seas.’
  • the dogs of war

    • literary The havoc accompanying military conflict.

      ‘the strategy would let loose the dogs of nuclear war’
      • ‘A peace process does not invariably produce a settlement, but it usually keeps the dogs of war at bay.’
      • ‘They hate having to break from a comfortable routine and they will cry havoc and loose the dogs of war on anybody who tries to take something from them.’
      • ‘And with the dogs of war in full cry, no politicians in their right mind dared come out in favor of allowing tax dodgers to stick their hands in Uncle Sam's pockets.’
      • ‘He has no reason to let loose the dogs of war on his neighbours.’
      • ‘The siren song in any war on terror is ‘let slip the dogs of war.’’
      • ‘If Washington calls off the dogs of war, the companies will be allowed to immediately return.’
      • ‘One problem with loosing the dogs of war is that sometimes it's hard to get them back on the leash.’
      • ‘Unless we can leash the dogs of war, new kinds of instability will result from this war for peace.’
      • ‘Europe can only keep at bay the dogs of war that tore it asunder twice in the last century if all its parts work intimately with each other.’
      • ‘Possible suspensions of civil liberties are something we should all be keeping an eye on now, watchdogs among the dogs of war.’
  • dressed (up) like a dog's dinner

    • informal Wearing ridiculously smart or ostentatious clothes.

      ‘look at her, dressed up like a dog's dinner’
      • ‘Who's going to look a silly boy then, all dressed up like a dog's dinner in front of that lot!’
      • ‘I put the phone down on the bed while I dressed up like a dog's dinner.’
      • ‘It is then present day and we are introduced to Mo, a goth dressed up like a dog's dinner with a fuzzball hairdo.’
      • ‘You know, some of the showbiz ladies around here - they go to the shops dressed up like a dog's dinner.’
      • ‘If, by chance, you happen upon a fashionista dressed like a dog's dinner, do not be alarmed when she tells you that she's being ‘ironic’.’
  • every dog has his (or its) day

    • proverb Everyone will have good luck or success at some point in their lives.

      • ‘It's not nice to keep losing but every dog has its day.’
      • ‘But every dog has his day I guess so this one could be it.’
      • ‘It is said that every dog has his day and it has been a long time between barks for Dick - so well done!’
      • ‘‘Well, you know what they say… every dog has its day,’ he pointed out.’
      • ‘I'm aware that, very, very occasionally a performance is given which astonishes us all, but every dog has his day, and England's problem is having too few of these.’
      • ‘After many weeks of shooting in the high 120's and hitting the ball like a dog, his first win for over 2 years proved that every dog has its day.’
      • ‘As I said to him after the game, every dog has his day and fair dues to them.’
      • ‘However, no sooner had I written this than I get to find out every dog has his day, right?’
      • ‘There comes a time to stop, every dog has its day, and I think I have had mine.’
      • ‘In parallel with his ascendancy to the top of the NFL tree went his present team, their unlikely transformation from zeroes to heroes last season illustrating that every dog has its day.’
  • give a dog a bad name and hang him

    • proverb It's very difficult to lose a bad reputation, even if it's unjustified.

      • ‘But give a dog a bad name and hang him, as the saying goes.’
      • ‘It could, however, be a case of ‘give a dog a bad name and hang him’.’
      • ‘He explains why ‘as a variant on the popular advice to give a dog a bad name and hang him,’ he proposes to ‘give this piper an exceedingly bad name and hang on to it.’’
  • go to the dogs

    • informal Deteriorate shockingly.

      ‘the country is going to the dogs’
      • ‘When the factories closed, everything went to the dogs.’
      • ‘As Anna and I used to say at work, this place has gone to the dogs.’
      • ‘Law and order went to the dogs after the Whitlam social experiments of excessive welfare, booming populations of single mothers, poor discipline in schools.’
      • ‘Although the city has developed by leaps and bounds over the years, the cleanliness for which it was known has gone to the dogs, says the collector.’
      • ‘I do not believe that our economy has gone to the dogs as a mistake.’
      • ‘Unfortunately not only the army but the country also eventually went to the dogs.’
      • ‘Everybody had to run hard to keep up the real level of their own earnings, while the country went to the dogs.’
      • ‘But, to be honest, I'm not stupid, that team has gone to the dogs.’
      • ‘As an adult I love wearing them now my eyesight has gone to the dogs.’
      • ‘They feel that their countries have gone to the dogs under the leadership of the present generation of politicians.’
      deteriorate, be in decline, degenerate, decay
      collapse, slump, slip, slide, go downhill, go backwards, go to rack and ruin, stagnate, wane, ebb
      go to pot, hit the skids, go down the toilet, go down the tubes
      go to the pack
      View synonyms
  • have a dog in the fight

    • [usually with negative]Be affected by or have a particular interest in the outcome of a situation.

      ‘you don't even live here, therefore you don't have a dog in this fight’
  • like a dog with two tails

    • Used to emphasize how delighted someone is.

      ‘‘Is he pleased?’ ‘Like a dog with two tails.’’
      • ‘When I entered the room of the carnival party, I was like a dog with two tails but I was a bit anxious because I hadn't learned the poem, that I had to recite by heart.’
      • ‘I am not used to being home, my husband is like a dog with two tails, and his excitement at having me here is starting to annoy me.’
      • ‘He was like a dog with two tails, strutting round and showing off his winnings.’
      • ‘My brother was like a dog with two tails when his girlfriend agreed to marry him; he was really happy.’
      • ‘I felt like a dog with two tails, because I was proud to have been in Montgomery's Eighth Army.’
      • ‘So Hans was like a dog with two tails, as well he might have been!’
      • ‘At last I had my coach; I was like a dog with two tails.’
      • ‘After we helped her with her yard, she would enthuse: ‘I feel like a dog with two tails!’’
      • ‘As you can imagine I was like a dog with two tails.’
      • ‘My husband is like a dog with two tails about this holiday having never been on a cruise before!’
      contented, content, cheerful, cheery, merry, joyful, jovial, jolly, joking, jocular, gleeful, carefree, untroubled, delighted, smiling, beaming, grinning, glowing, satisfied, gratified, buoyant, radiant, sunny, blithe, joyous, beatific, blessed
      View synonyms
  • not a dog's chance

    • No chance at all.

      ‘you wouldn't have a dog's chance’
      ‘a month ago I didn't give him a dog's chance’
      • ‘He says, ‘They are not to blame, they have not a dog's chance - we should be like them if we settled here.’’
      • ‘The Government did aim at that objective, but it has now had to acknowledge that there is not a dog's chance of meeting it.’
      • ‘There is not a dog's chance of the country recovering to the top half of the organisation within a decade.’
      • ‘There is not a dog's chance of that happening.’
  • put on the dog

    • informal Behave in a pretentious or ostentatious way.

      ‘we have to put on the dog for Anne Marie’
      • ‘The CEO put on the dog today as he welcomed customers to the enterprise software company's annual users' conference.’
      • ‘Because the companies usually have inked deals before the show with key licensees, why drag the whole staff and put on the dog for three dizzying days?’
      • ‘I suppose I should have worked harder to raise money and put on the dog a little more, but the truth is, I was having too much fun and didn't want to take the time.’
      • ‘Al, with his short curly hair greased back, was putting on the dog and crooning a ballad into a microphone.’
  • throw someone to the dogs

    • Discard someone as worthless.

      ‘young people look upon the older person as someone to be thrown to the dogs’
      • ‘If he plans for us to do anything more… I'll help you throw him to the dogs.’
      • ‘They are already trying to protect Hannah with denials he could possibly have been involved, presumably meaning that they would be willing to throw Libby to the dogs.’
      • ‘The clear inference was that the Island authorities got wind of the investigation and decided to throw him to the dogs.’
      • ‘I could tell that Jeremiah was planning on throwing me to the dogs.’
      • ‘You threw me to the dogs and now I'm running from the pack.’
      • ‘If the film is a hit, it's okay, but if it is not, they are thrown to the dogs.’
      • ‘Then the punters, who have encouraged every vice or flaw, hold up their hands in mock outrage and throw them to the dogs.’
      • ‘I'm willing to throw him to the dogs for leaking about our listening in on the terrorist's satellite phones.’
      • ‘Just as Joanna is ready to throw him to the dogs, she meets another equally sceptical figure in the shape of Bobbie.’
      • ‘She devoted her life to you and you threw her to the dogs!’
  • you can't teach an old dog new tricks

    • proverb You cannot make people change their ways.

      • ‘The latter may account for the fact that it is more difficult for elderly people to learn new motor skills; in other words, you can't teach an old dog new tricks.’
      • ‘There is something to be said for that old saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks.’
      • ‘I wonder if sometimes doctors think it's unsuitable because they think you can't teach an old dog new tricks.’
      • ‘He has surprised many by defying the adage that you can't teach an old dog new tricks by adopting a more attacking approach than he normally favours for his teams.’
      • ‘Like they say, you can't teach an old dog new tricks.’
      • ‘But I say that you can't teach an old dog new tricks.’
      • ‘Teddy's 75th minute free-kick which wrapped up England's victory had ‘Beckham’ stamped right through it to disprove the theory that you can't teach an old dog new tricks.’
      • ‘They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but this winter they are finally going to be proven wrong.’
      • ‘They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but, apparently, you can take some old film ideas and give them a new twist.’
      • ‘‘Well, you can't teach an old dog new tricks,’ Ghost said, ‘But for some, there are exceptions.’’
  • why keep a dog and bark yourself?

    • proverb Why pay someone to work for you and then do the work yourself?


Old English docga, of unknown origin.