Definition of doddle in English:

doddle

noun

British
informal
  • A very easy task.

    ‘this printer's a doddle to set up and use’
    • ‘Being an MP may be a doddle for obscure Labour backbenchers, but not for party leaders, and Salmond will inevitably become UK leader again.’
    • ‘The home page is uncluttered; searching is a doddle.’
    • ‘Filing may sound a doddle, but believe me some companies have weird systems devised by crazy employees who clearly didn't want anyone else to find anything.’
    • ‘Part-time work is a doddle compared to being a full-time mum.’
    • ‘I thought, ‘This game's a doddle - you just turn up, someone gives you a film, you talk the lines and then go home.’’
    • ‘Three successive wins later, England occupy the commanding heights in Group Six, and the rest of the World Cup qualifying campaign ought to be a doddle.’
    • ‘In fact, compared with today, it'll be a doddle.’
    • ‘The public performance part of my job - the workshops and training - is hence a doddle.’
    • ‘Sums were a doddle and ‘he had the answers as quick as the questions were written on the blackboard‘.’
    • ‘So I left school at 17, supported my A-level studies through jobs and then when I got to university it felt like a doddle!’
    • ‘It looked a doddle, but it wasn't - well not for someone recently technophobic - and I burned the midnight oil trying to install the programme.’
    • ‘I still contend that if you can perform to thirty people and give them a good show then any bigger audience is a doddle.’
    • ‘They're easy to use, make cross-platform file swapping a doddle, and they're incredibly convenient.’
    • ‘Ritchie says: ‘A few years ago, that company would have been a doddle to fund.’’
    • ‘It is a peerless town car, being so quick and nimble, and it's a breeze to park and a doddle to drive in heavy traffic.’
    • ‘If I can import all these birds into the country then bringing in heroin must be a absolute doddle.’
    • ‘An electronic programme guide makes navigating schedules and setting recordings a doddle.’
    • ‘The ten-mile trip from the AMF Bowl in Keighley will be a doddle compared to the 3,500-mile trip the couple journeyed to the Czech Republic and back last summer.’
    • ‘According to the lieutenant, playing rugby for a living is a doddle when you've survived cadet school.’
    • ‘We get it every year, in magazines, newspaper, on the television and radio, so-called experts spout forth with tips on how to make Christmas a doddle.’
    easy task, easy job, child's play, five-finger exercise, gift, walkover, nothing, sinecure, gravy train
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s: perhaps from dialect doddle ‘toddle’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

doddle

/ˈdɒd(ə)l/