Definition of doctrine in English:

doctrine

noun

  • 1A belief or set of beliefs held and taught by a Church, political party, or other group:

    ‘the doctrine of predestination’
    • ‘Ironically, in escaping political doctrines, he found himself snared by a musical ideology.’
    • ‘There were significant restrictions on the freedom of individuals to question or reject church doctrine.’
    • ‘Both groups continue to perpetuate the old and outworn doctrines of party politics.’
    • ‘We're moving on now, leaving medieval doctrines and superstitious belief systems behind.’
    • ‘The ideals of the party become sacred doctrines that can in no event be violated or contradicted.’
    • ‘In this book, he rejects the doctrine of original sin and replaces it with original goodness.’
    • ‘At the moment opinions differ too much to formulate a doctrine of predestination that is acceptable for all parties.’
    • ‘Recent legal regulation of democratic practices has focused on developing constitutional doctrines that permit courts to reshape political practices.’
    • ‘It attained some popularity due to a mistaken belief that it taught orthodox Mahyna doctrines, such as emptiness.’
    • ‘However, the East never developed a doctrine of original sin as the west did.’
    • ‘Of course, we have not yet developed the necessary tactical doctrine for systems we have not developed and flown.’
    • ‘Globally I think that the classical political doctrines will be seriously transformed.’
    • ‘Life is never as simple as most political doctrines would have us believe.’
    • ‘The outstanding distinction lies in the fact that Buddhist doctrine is propounded by an apparently historical founder.’
    • ‘Catholic social doctrine was seen as an alternative to, and bulwark against, socialism.’
    • ‘Some other missionaries may have just been concerned to teach the doctrines of the church.’
    • ‘In 325, church leaders were willing to die to see that orthodox doctrine was upheld.’
    • ‘Since the Catholic mass was forbidden in late Elizabethan England, accepting the doctrine of transubstantiation necessitated risking considerable penalties.’
    • ‘I now accepted the orthodox Christian doctrine of Creation.’
    • ‘I'm not a god-fearing man but I do at times incline towards the highest doctrines of the church.’
    creed, credo, dogma, belief, set of beliefs, code of belief, conviction, teaching
    tenet, maxim, article of faith, canon
    principle, precept, notion, idea, ideology, theory, thesis
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    1. 1.1US A stated principle of government policy, mainly in foreign or military affairs:
      ‘the Truman Doctrine’
      • ‘We proclaim a new doctrine of preemption which is understood by few and feared by many.’
      • ‘He demonstrates that the Bush doctrine is connected with the spread of neoliberalism and global capital.’
      • ‘If he adopts a doctrine of pre-emption, he is unacceptably remaking American national-security policy.’
      • ‘The conquest of Iraq was the first test of the Bush doctrine of preventive war.’
      • ‘Are we discussing the Powell doctrine, or is this a critique of what's going on in the world right now?’
      • ‘The Bush doctrine is being evoked as a template for conflict resolution worldwide.’
      principle, rule, tenet, canon, code, guideline, working principle, law, ordinance, statute, command, order, decree, mandate, dictate, dictum, directive, direction, instruction, injunction, prescription, commandment
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin doctrina teaching, learning, from doctor teacher, from docere teach.

Pronunciation

doctrine

/ˈdɒktrɪn/