Main definitions of do in English

: do1do2

do1

verb

  • 1[with object] Perform (an action, the precise nature of which is often unspecified):

    ‘something must be done about the city's traffic’
    ‘she knew what she was doing’
    ‘what can I do for you?’
    ‘Brian was looking at the girl, and had been doing so for most of the hearing’
    • ‘She told him more must be done and he admitted there was a problem.’
    • ‘In this, your time of crisis, what can we Americans do to help?’
    • ‘When the riot squad did move, it was so fast and so precise nothing could be done.’
    • ‘More must be done to prevent moorland in the North West being destroyed by fire, according to a new report.’
    • ‘After doing so much for this wonderful city, why did you have to suddenly go away?’
    • ‘But she was also the kid who never did anything exceptionally right.’
    • ‘And it's me doing the reading, which makes me feel like I must have done something right.’
    • ‘There was nothing he could do anyway at the moment.’
    • ‘Are there things you are doing which could be handed over to someone else?’
    • ‘Something must be done to halt the alarming decline in television audiences on whom it depends for its lifeblood.’
    • ‘Or is it that the insurance companies are ripping us off - something must be done about this.’
    • ‘Sometimes it seems that there is just not enough time to do everything that must be done.’
    • ‘If Amy wasn't with us we'd have probably done something but she was our excuse for not doing so.’
    • ‘I do accept that it cannot be done overnight, but I do think it must be done.’
    • ‘Ms Doyle said everything must be done to ensure that this disease does not occur again.’
    • ‘Of course he is, this kid went to Yale, the reward for kids who do everything right.’
    • ‘Something must be done to put a stop to the all too frequent bouts of trouble which occur at the nightclub.’
    • ‘But Jeremy feels more must be done to find permanent homes for the homeless community.’
    • ‘I really didn't know what I was doing.’
    • ‘They replace trust and discussion and flexibility with things that must be done.’
    carry out, undertake, discharge, execute, perpetrate, perform, accomplish, implement, achieve, complete, finish, conclude
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Perform (a particular task):
      ‘Dad always did the washing up on Sundays’
      • ‘Until the clothes are on the models and all the hair and make-up is done, you're never going to see the whole picture.’
      • ‘I am currently doing a page by page check of changes and will bring them to your attention in the coming weeks.’
      • ‘Teachers are routinely doing tasks that were previously carried out by support staff.’
      • ‘Also I've been doing some re-writes to bring the show up to date, so that complicated the issue further.’
      • ‘She says that more and more, charities end up doing the tasks the state is supposed to look after.’
      • ‘This means they've usually done all the hoovering before you get round to wanting to do it.’
      • ‘It was really strange, because one moment she was just cooking and doing the chores at home, and the next moment she was on telly.’
      • ‘I spent this afternoon doing Christmas Shopping.’
      • ‘After each task, the teams swapped over their mode of transport and did the tasks all over again.’
      • ‘Will Vivian make me do evil, horrible chores?’
      • ‘His mother had been a miserly woman and had not done a single charitable deed in her lifetime.’
      • ‘When doing a manual task you really cannot avoid, use a tool with a smaller grip.’
      • ‘We keep in touch with what our customers want by doing two shifts on the shop floor every week and I am the manager for that time.’
      • ‘There's loads of washing up to be done, general tidying around the house, and a whole bunch of shopping to get in.’
      • ‘In the past few weeks he has done tasks around the home, such as turning lights on and off and unloading the washing machine.’
      • ‘This helps them develop a sense of responsibility and a habit for doing these tasks.’
      • ‘The man is extremely capable and cooks, cleans and does all his own washing and ironing.’
      • ‘She'd do her shopping early in the morning so as not to talk to people.’
      • ‘Also, no matter how much I dislike doing the garden work, it is quite satisfying to see the end results.’
      • ‘Starting by doing menial tasks teaches people respect for others and also earns their respect.’
    2. 1.2 Work on (something) to bring it to completion or to a required state:
      ‘it takes them longer to do their hair than me’
      ‘she's the secretary and does the publicity’
      • ‘I had my hair and make-up done by professionals, was taught how to walk on a catwalk and got to model three outfits.’
      • ‘When she left school, she did the accounts for a fruit shop.’
      • ‘I'm going to get my hair done a bit more often and go for facials and pamper myself a bit more.’
      • ‘During the dry weather the track to the mine was passable but work had to be done on it to carry heavy traffic.’
      • ‘The chap who does the garden said he wanted to hear some of my music.’
      • ‘He added the review had taken around two years and was done through numerous public consultations.’
      • ‘Go get an estimate to have it done by someone else and tell her how much she would have to pay.’
      • ‘I don't like people touching my hair, doing my make-up or telling me what to wear.’
      • ‘Nowadays the sales analysis is all done by computer, and is therefore totally reliable.’
      • ‘Some of the ground has already been done so work on the project should start soon.’
      prepare, make, get ready, fix, produce, see to, arrange, organize, be responsible for, be in charge of, look after, take on
      style, arrange, adjust, groom, preen, primp, prink
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3British informal [no object] Do the cleaning for a person or household:
      ‘Florrie usually did for the Shermans in the mornings’
    4. 1.4 Make or have available and provide:
      ‘many hotels don't do single rooms at all’
      [with two objects] ‘he decided to do her a pastel sketch of himself’
      • ‘We are now doing a three-course Sunday lunch for £9.95.’
      • ‘Does anyone know of a central Manhattan hotel which does family rooms?’
      • ‘The lamb was pleasant enough if not amazing (I think I've been spoiled by the Turkish place on Gillygate, which surely does the best lamb in town), and the vegetables were nicely done.’
      • ‘The bar does meals, which looked filling, and the view over the bay is great!’
      • ‘They are doing a Season Ticket: £40’
      • ‘I have another chef on my yacht who does different food - fish, salads and raw vegetables.’
      paint, draw, sketch
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5 Solve; work out:
      ‘Joe was doing sums aloud’
      • ‘Again, multiply the two together and you'll see how the sums have been done.’
      • ‘After doing some hard financial sums, I left the day job to chase a few dreams.’
      • ‘It may be that you'll need to reassess your choices once you've done some more detailed sums.’
      • ‘They would watch videos, read books and do puzzles.’
      • ‘I find doing crosswords strangely relaxing.’
      • ‘Inspector Morse - Gruffly drinks beer and does crosswords in Oxford’
      work out, figure out, calculate, add up
      View synonyms
    6. 1.6 Cook (food) to completion or to a specified degree:
      ‘if a knife inserted into the centre comes out clean, then your pie is done’
      • ‘She handed him a towel and the phone, and then left to make sure her food was doing okay.’
      • ‘When the cake is done let it cool completely in the cake tin before turning it out onto a plate or cooling rack.’
      • ‘On the Indian side of the menu, we recommend lamb, which is always done to perfection.’
      • ‘When the burger and onions are almost done, toast the bread on the grill or in a toaster.’
      • ‘When those are both done, add the pasta to the bacon, and mix for a bit, then add the cream until it's all warm.’
    7. 1.7 (often in questions) work at for a living:
      ‘what does she do?’
      • ‘Do you remember when I told you what my parents did for a living?’
      • ‘But talking about this kind of thing is what I do for a living.’
      • ‘After a day or two, she discovered what I did for a living and began making local specialities, dishes not on the menu.’
      • ‘My sis will soon find out what I've really been doing for the past 3 years here.’
      • ‘I keep asking him what he is going to do when he leaves school and he just keeps saying that all he wants to do is play football.’
      • ‘What exactly is it that you do?’
      • ‘I'm still unsure as to what I should be doing for a job - all I know is that it involves creativity.’
      • ‘What he does for a living is intensely private and frustratingly protracted.’
      • ‘What does your dad do for a living?’
      do for a living, work at, be employed as, earn a living as, earn a living at
      View synonyms
    8. 1.8 Learn or study; take as one's subject:
      ‘I'm doing English, German, and History’
      • ‘We had this sort of thing going on when I was doing my Fine Art Degree.’
      • ‘We did French at primary school then I did Spanish at secondary school.’
      • ‘However, doing a PhD requires a high level of emotional management both within and outwith the field.’
      • ‘I am doing the most demanding degree, but I could maybe take a year out.’
      • ‘In what sense are we required to follow the canons of correct reasoning when doing mathematics?’
      study, read, learn, take a course in, take classes in, be taught
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    9. 1.9 Produce or give a performance of (a particular play, opera, etc.):
      ‘the Royal Shakespeare Company are doing Macbeth next month’
      • ‘As for serious theatre, it is impossible to be more serious than doing a David Hare play, as Les did, appearing in Skylight in Newbury, or touring Helsinki in the Finnish play Cherished Disappointments In Love with Janet Suzman.’
      • ‘When I was doing Sunset Boulevard in London, Jon Pertwee came to see the show.’
      • ‘What really means a lot to me is how encouraged I've been by the Brits, in terms of doing Shakespeare.’
      • ‘I am working in Norfolk doing a Christmas Spectacular - but I will have to look at a map before I set off.’
      • ‘Says Grandmaître, ‘At the first run-through, they were dancing like we were doing Swan Lake in New York.’’
      • ‘This is going to be another whole new experience for me because I've never done Peter Pan before.’
      • ‘I thought it was a really compelling one and probably for the same reason I like doing Shakespeare plays.’
      • ‘Luckily I got over it when I was doing Side Man in London.’
      • ‘About six months later I did Spice World with them and they all taught me their moves from the video.’
      • ‘At present we are doing a modern Russian play and another straight from New York.’
      • ‘As most of you know, our school has traditionally done Shakespeare passages for our Recitations.’
      put on, present, produce, give
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    10. 1.10informal Imitate (a particular person) in order to entertain people:
      ‘he not only does Schwarzenegger and Groucho, he becomes them’
      • ‘We'd just discarded the possibility of me doing a Lara Croft convincingly.’
      • ‘No one can do the Queen like you! I have found myself enthralled watching your portrayal of her.’
      • ‘Well, Jamie Foxx does an incredible performance doing Ray Charles in the movie ‘Ray’ from Universal Pictures.’
      • ‘If you ask me, he does Rolf Harris better than Rolf Harris does himself!’
      • ‘He does a great Elvis and my guests just loved him.’
    11. 1.11informal Take (a narcotic drug):
      ‘he doesn't smoke, drink, or do drugs’
      • ‘I've done enough drugs over the years to know what it's like.’
      • ‘She's admitted that she does cocaine.’
      • ‘She would be there doing heroin and I started off by just having a line on the foil.’
      • ‘I have never smoked, don't drink, and have never done drugs.’
      • ‘See if anyone else is having doubts that all the drugs they've done really were spiritual.’
      • ‘In the months previously, he had claimed he was doing up to 100 bags of heroin a day.’
    12. 1.12 Attend to (someone):
      ‘the barber said he'd do me next’
      • ‘A guy came in to get his lip pierced and Robbie asked if he could do him first and I told him it was no problem.’
      • ‘He said he could do me after he finished the one he was doing, but I said no thanks. I’ll wait until tomorrow.’
      • ‘If your employees do not do another customer in between, the time would be booked as 120 minutes or two hours straight time.’
    13. 1.13vulgar slang Have sexual intercourse with.
    14. 1.14do itinformal Have sexual intercourse:
      ‘I only ever did it in the missionary position’
      • ‘I hit 16, went to college and one of the guys in my class said that he reckoned I was great in the sack and asked me to 'do it' with him behind the bike sheds.’
      • ‘I like to do it in the morning.’
    15. 1.15do itinformal Urinate or defecate.
  • 2[with object] Achieve or complete, in particular:

    1. 2.1 Travel (a specified distance):
      ‘one car I looked at had done 112,000 miles’
      • ‘The car does about 35-40 miles to the gallon.’
      • ‘I rode 5 miles yesterday, and did 12 miles today, and already feel better mentally and physically than I have in a few years.’
      • ‘By now it is believed to have done the highest mileage of any comparable plane still in service.’
      travel, journey, go, cover, travel over, pass over, journey over, traverse, cross, range over, put behind one, get under one's belt, attain, achieve, log
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Travel at (a specified speed):
      ‘I was speeding, doing seventy-five’
      • ‘Furthermore what if you were told that had they been doing the speed limit, they could have survived?’
      • ‘Ten of those caught face a court appearance, mostly because they were clocked doing excessively high speeds.’
      • ‘As he sped across the highway out of the city, he couldn't help notice that someone was doing exactly the same speed behind him.’
      • ‘The speed a car is doing is only one element which affects the safety of road users.’
      • ‘He maintains he was doing the speed limit and had no time to react.’
      • ‘A number of bikers were also reported for speeding with one clocked doing 96 mph.’
      • ‘It is tacky and I don't like not being able to see what speed you are doing.’
      • ‘We were doing exactly the same speeds and it was a really nice and clean fight.’
      drive at, travel at, go at, proceed at, move at
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3 Make (a particular journey):
      ‘last time I did Oxford–York return by train it was £50’
      • ‘The journey has been done once before, by a Frenchman in 132 days just under ten years ago.’
      • ‘I did London to Paris for charity last year.’
      • ‘If they get their journey done quickly it frees up the taxi for other users.’
      • ‘I had complete confidence in the pilot, he does the journey back and forth so many times a day he could probably do it blindfold.’
      • ‘In the seven years I've been doing that journey, I'm thinking that takes my total to five.’
    4. 2.4 Achieve (a specified sales figure):
      ‘our bestselling album did about a million worldwide’
      • ‘Her last album only did 130,000 in the first week.’
      • ‘Mark my words, look in six months and no one will have any remembrance that it 'only' did one million copies in its first month.’
      • ‘The second book did a fraction of the first book's sales.’
    5. 2.5informal Visit as a tourist, especially in a superficial or hurried way:
      ‘the Americans are allotted only a day to do the Yorkshire Moors’
      • ‘In 1996 we did London, Paris, Brussels, Cologne and Amsterdam.’
      • ‘We did the Eiffel Tower on Friday because we figured the queues would be shorter than on Saturday or Sunday.’
      • ‘If you are in New York, you really have to do the Empire State Building!’
      • ‘Dave is doing Europe over the next couple of months.’
      • ‘The area can be very crowded with surfers and tourists doing Land's End.’
      visit, tour, sightsee in, look around, look round, take in the sights of
      View synonyms
    6. 2.6 Spend (a specified period of time) in prison or in a particular occupation:
      ‘he did five years for manslaughter’
      ‘Peter has done thirteen years in the RAF’
      • ‘I ended up back in prison doing fifteen months for handling stolen goods.’
      • ‘He had done five years for housebreaking.’
      • ‘He did 25 years in the Air Force.’
      • ‘She did 10 years for aggravated murder in Hawaii before her sentence was overturned.’
    7. 2.7informal [no object] Finish:
      ‘you must sit there and wait till I've done’
      [with present participle] ‘we've done arguing’
      • ‘Kaitlyn and I will just go upstairs and talk to Sam until you guys are done down here.’
      • ‘I was done tidying up the house at around 12:30 pm and went down to my apartment and ate lunch.’
      • ‘In the middle of the course, I'm done with science and make a small bid for freedom.’
      • ‘It is finished, all done, and not able to be processed because of funding issues at this point of time.’
      • ‘Are you done with your Christmas shopping?’
      • ‘Well, if you guys are done over there, we're going to get to some more ‘showbiz shorts.’’
      • ‘Once Varla was done she pulled out some cream and told Amy to apply it to her face.’
      • ‘She is up packing our stuff right now and she should be done within five minutes or so.’
      • ‘He says a cable guy buddy of his just got done with a job and is going to come over and help him.’
      finished, ended, concluded, terminated, complete, completed, finalized, accomplished, achieved, realized, fulfilled, perfected, consummated, discharged, settled, executed
      View synonyms
    8. 2.8be done Be over:
      ‘the special formula continues to beautify your tan when the day is done’
      • ‘The working week is done and we're more than up for cocktail fun.’
      • ‘This is the signal that the night is done, and that the sun is coming up.’
      • ‘These people should get some sort of satisfaction when the day is done.’
    9. 2.9be/have done withBritish Give up concern for; have finished with:
      ‘I should sell the place and be done with it’
      ‘Steve was not done with her’
      • ‘We need some new scandal and controversy now that that one is done with (until next year).’
      • ‘Can you honestly say that, once the back-slapping and drinks all round were done with, you would be completely overjoyed on his behalf?’
      • ‘Once she was done with that she went to her grand piano and started to play it.’
      • ‘When we were done with that, she had us all sit down at a desk.’
      • ‘When the teacher was done with that, she pulled out a pad of paper and looked once more out into the class.’
      • ‘Once we were done with that, we made a dash to the speeders.’
      • ‘We weren't allowed to talk during lunch, until we were done with the meal and out in the schoolyard.’
      • ‘When they were done with that they moved to the couch and she leaned against his chest and he wrapped his arms around her and they sat in silence for a while.’
      • ‘Later on that day, when classes were done with, Trent headed back to his room.’
      • ‘All of the after school sports were done with for the day, and most of the teachers had gone home to prepare for the next day of classes.’
      • ‘Hunter covered his head and waited until the swishing sounds were done with.’
      • ‘After all the travelling is done with for a while and Frost is settled back at home, he plans to revive a sleeping dragon.’
      • ‘Once a visitor is done with all the mystic tourism Marlborough is close to hand for a bit of shopping or lunch.’
      • ‘He felt like crying, then, though he had promised himself that he was done with that.’
      • ‘She stopped, stood up, presumed that she was done with and strode out of the room.’
      • ‘All the pomp and ceremony being done with, Lyon kick off from right to left in their dark blue.’
      • ‘Now that my only wedding of the summer is done with, I'm wondering how to get myself on the guest list.’
      • ‘I just want it to be done with, but I don't want to deal with any of the moving or saying goodbye stuff.’
      • ‘When they were done with all that they lotioned up, and put on a pore minimizing mask and went to bed.’
      • ‘The crowd was breaking apart now that the formal ceremonies were done with.’
      be finished with, have finished with, be done with, be through with, want no more to do with, be no longer involved in, be no longer involved with, have given up, have no further dealings with, have turned one's back on, have washed one's hands of, have no more truck with
      be finished with, have finished with, be done with, be through with, want no more to do with, have no further dealings with, turn one's back on, be no longer involved in, be no longer involved with, end relations with, give up, wash one's hands of, have no more truck with
      be finished with, have finished with, have done with, be through with, want no more to do with, have no further dealings with, turn one's back on, be no longer involved in, be no longer involved with, end relations with, give up, wash one's hands of, have no more truck with
      View synonyms
  • 3[no object, with adverbial] Act or behave in a specified way:

    ‘they are free to do as they please’
    ‘you did well to bring her back’
    • ‘He said his client admitted he had done wrong and would behave differently if he had his time again.’
    • ‘Instead of the client telling the architect what to do, he was increasingly doing as he pleased.’
    • ‘He did well to finish on the predominantly flat fast course to finish in the top 70.’
    • ‘It's cold and wet out there so I think all are just as happy to be here and doing as we please.’
    • ‘He has done well to distance himself from the talk but this brawl will surely add more fuel to the fire.’
    • ‘After seeing the injury, Brewster insisted that the police were called and accepted he had done wrong.’
    • ‘Assessment of burn area tends to be done badly, even by those who are expert at it.’
    • ‘Had he chosen to remain a private citizen he could have done as he pleased.’
    • ‘They just go through life doing exactly as they please, expecting no retribution for their behaviour.’
    • ‘Ever since Wapping they have bullied, done just as they pleased and ignored the union.’
    • ‘He is used to doing as he pleases and takes notice of nobody.’
    act, behave, conduct oneself, acquit oneself
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Make progress or perform in a specified way; get on or fare:
      ‘when a team is doing badly, it's not easy for a new player to settle in’
      ‘Mrs Walters, how're you doing?’
      • ‘He's done tremendously well in the last two games and you can't get any harder than the opposition he's faced.’
      • ‘He has just been doing his A levels and he thinks he has done really badly.’
      • ‘I have to make the most of this good spell of form, and am pleased that we are doing well in Europe.’
      • ‘I convinced myself I'd done incredibly badly, snapped at everyone in sight and was no fun at all.’
      • ‘My husband, Charlie, is chuffed about it and he is pleased that I am doing well.’
      • ‘I couldn't tell how well or badly I was doing since it was like taking part in a game without knowing the rules.’
      • ‘We needed to win in the one-day series after doing badly in the Tests.’
      • ‘This time I was sure I had done well and was pleased with my performance but I lost.’
      • ‘I work on the basis that, if you are right eight or nine times out of ten, you are not doing too badly.’
      • ‘This is not a dramatic slashing of jobs because the company is doing badly.’
      • ‘None of those things is conducive to doing well out on the tennis court.’
      • ‘It will obviously all hinge on how well we are doing as the game progresses.’
      • ‘A representative checks every three or four days to make sure the work is being done properly.’
      • ‘It happens irrespective of how well or badly the economy is doing.’
      • ‘If she asks any of you how you think we've done, please give us a glowing report and a gold star.’
      • ‘Even if one were free of need and doing well in all other respects, one would still view life as not worth living without friends.’
      • ‘In that case we've done pretty well, finishing in mid-table in a very competitive top flight.’
      • ‘But one trend is clear: smaller retailers are suffering while the big boys are doing fine.’
      • ‘Chairman of Hampshire Police Federation Keith Ward said he was pleased that Hampshire was doing well.’
      • ‘I got a couple more on my retakes, and to be honest it never really bothered me that I'd done so badly.’
      get on, get along, progress, fare, make out, get by, manage, cope, survive
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2[with object and complement] Have a specified effect on:
      ‘the walk will do me good’
      • ‘It will do you good to have some fresh air.’
      • ‘He could fall and really do himself damage.’
      • ‘The others have petered off and seeing us climb a few places does everyone the world of good.’
      • ‘They'll do themselves harm one way or another.’
      • ‘This report has done me untold damage.’
      • ‘However in those days we didn't think we might be doing ourselves serious harm.’
    3. 3.3[with object] Result in:
      ‘the years of stagnation did a lot of harm to the younger generation’
      • ‘The rapid expansion in 90-92, combined with the recession, did a lot of harm financially, and the company finally went bankrupt.’
      • ‘The original radio series gave many well know comedians their first chance at performing to the public so it did some good.’
      • ‘This storm obviously did quite a bit of damage to area homes, businesses and vehicles.’
      • ‘There's a lot of things that have to be put right because the recession did a lot of damage.’
  • 4[no object] Be suitable or acceptable:

    ‘if he's anything like you, he'll do’
    [with object] ‘a couple of quid'll do me’
    • ‘About this time I realized I was still in a long dress and striped shirt, which won't do for the party.’
    • ‘I'm looking for someone to blame my feelings on and you'll do.’
    • ‘‘This sweater will do me fine,’ I answered, and I shut the door behind me’
    • ‘It's not what I would have hoped for, but it'll have to do.’
    suffice, be adequate, be satisfactory, be acceptable, be good enough, be of use, fill the bill, fit the bill, answer the purpose, serve the purpose, meet one's needs, pass muster
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 Suffice or be usable:
      ‘a strip of white cotton about 20 yards long did for a fence’
      • ‘Any piece of paper slipped between two pages would do as a bookmark, but origami bookmarks are stylish and will distinguish you apart from the rest.’
      • ‘A rocky ledge, we decide, will do fine as a lunch spot.’
  • 5informal [with object] Beat up or kill:

    ‘one day I'll do him’
    • ‘I'll do you one of these nights!’
    • ‘Do you think he did kill himself or was he done in by someone else?’
    • ‘I'll do him with an iron bar.’
    1. 5.1be done Be ruined:
      ‘once you falter, you're done’
      • ‘My body said, ‘Okay, you're done,’ and I just fell apart.’
      • ‘He did not enter the majors until he was 28 and he was done by the time he was 37.’
      • ‘I do my warm-up set, then add a little bit more weight and I'm completely done after about 4 reps.’
    2. 5.2 Rob (a place):
      ‘this would be an easy place to do and there was plenty of money lying around’
      • ‘I don't know who, or what organisation, if any, did the bank.’
    3. 5.3British Swindle:
      ‘a thousand pounds for one set of photos—Jacqui had been done’
      • ‘How could some of Australia's biggest and shrewdest media outlets get done so badly.’
      • ‘Oh - and if you ever bought this spam filter to get rid of the nasties on your computer, you were apparently done.’
      • ‘The more I think about it, the more I think I've been done.’
      • ‘It was only after travelling to Amsterdam and meeting the fraudsters that she became suspicious and contacted police, who told her: ‘Sorry, but you've been done.’’
  • 6British usually be/get done forinformal [with object] Prosecute or convict:

    ‘we got done for conspiracy to cause GBH’
    • ‘I am sure I wasn't alone in being appalled by the performance of the rally drivers done for speeding this week.’
    • ‘Today, we're finding out what life is like for a sportsperson after getting done for drugs.’
    • ‘All this fun resulted in Donovan becoming the first pop star to be done for marijuana possession.’
    • ‘I've been done for drink-driving before.’
    • ‘I knew I had been done - the blinding flash of the fixed speed camera in Higher Wheelton gave it away.’

auxiliary verb

  • 1Used before a verb (except be, can, may, ought, shall, will) in questions and negative statements:

    ‘do you have any pets?’
    ‘did he see me?’
    ‘I don't smoke’
    ‘it does not matter’
    • ‘Unlike other Irish travel firms the company does not offer bookings direct from its website.’
    • ‘Three or four students have to share a textbook as the government does not provide enough books.’
    • ‘This man noted in his diary that he did not usually lose his temper with servants.’
    • ‘Has anyone tried this sort of thing and if so, what kind of results did you achieve?’
    • ‘The pain is usually felt on both sides may come on suddenly or gradually, and does not usually occur every day.’
    • ‘He does not accept that industrialised farming is to blame for the foot-and-mouth outbreak.’
    • ‘So does the company have what it takes to expand this market share, and can it afford it?’
    • ‘We thought we saw parakeets on a tree in the distance, but we didn't investigate this time.’
    • ‘Despite being the most dangerous road in the country, the A537 does not have a speed camera on it.’
    • ‘What does Shakespeare create in the play which makes it so timely for our present?’
    • ‘Were you told about the press release before it happened, or did you discover it after it had been sent out?’
    • ‘This Government, frightened of being seen as soft on the drugs trade, does not know what to do.’
    • ‘Tests today revealed that the teenager did not die of drug abuse.’
    • ‘I tried once before to recommend this to you, but did you get yourself a copy?’
    • ‘That evening a dance was held which did not finish until the early hours of the morning.’
    • ‘But he does not accept that his decision will imperil the organisation's survival.’
    • ‘Mum got back from holiday and said the house was so clean it didn't feel lived in.’
    • ‘The usual speed limits apply, but I did not see one speed camera in all of the miles I covered.’
    • ‘When they began to cook, did the first human beings incinerate or cremate themselves?’
    • ‘If players did not argue with the referee so much the amount of yellow and red cards would be cut drastically!’
    1. 1.1 Used to make tag questions:
      ‘you write poetry, don't you?’
      ‘I never seem to say the right thing, do I?’
      • ‘I look all right, don't I?’
      • ‘You do like champagne, don't you, Charles?’
      • ‘You do understand, don't you?’
      • ‘She does go on, doesn't she?’
      • ‘He did some outrageous things, didn't he?’
    2. 1.2 Used in negative commands:
      ‘don't be silly’
      ‘do not forget’
      • ‘You two kids have fun, and don't stay out too late.’
      • ‘‘Don't say that,’ I spat, ‘What do you know of it? Nothing!’’
      • ‘Don't forget you have to earn money before you can spend it.’
  • 2Used to refer back to a verb already mentioned:

    ‘he looks better than he did before’
    ‘you wanted to enjoy yourself, and you did’
    ‘as they get smarter, so do the crooks’
    ‘I paid for my two tickets on the train and did so without complaint’
    • ‘I accept, as Cleanthes did, that the argument does not by itself lead to that conclusion.’
    • ‘His conduct invited the police to draw the conclusions which they did and to act as they did.’
    • ‘He has briefed me fully on the background which led him to make the statement he did.’
    • ‘She said it was typical of her husband to act as he did when he swam out to reach the boys.’
    • ‘It actually costs more to manage a team of volunteers than it does to manage a team of paid staff.’
    • ‘Those who did not sign it were beaten until they did or officers simply forged their signature.’
    • ‘Comments like this makes your child feel even worse than she does already for failing at something.’
    • ‘Looks like he's going to be spending even more time on the bench than he does already.’
    • ‘Yes, it does seem impossible that my cat could sleep more than he already does, but it is true.’
    • ‘While many of our own have forgotten the importance of honouring our country, she did not.’
    • ‘You're a much weaker person than you used to be, but you still act like you did when everyone looked up to you.’
    • ‘I didn't get up until late today but I feel more tired now than I did when I went to bed last night.’
    • ‘Apparently you are not to expect a man to act how he did when you were simply dating.’
    • ‘But I concede that a minority of young people behave worse than they did in my own youth.’
    • ‘Graham Lee's mount has been in good form lately and looks more at home over hurdles than he did over fences.’
    • ‘Liz doesn't seem to have a blog, but Crystal Evans does, and of course so does the Homeless Guy.’
    • ‘On this occasion, the Warsaw native's quotes offered no clue to exactly why he chose to act the way he did.’
    • ‘Nothing like this could ever happen and yet it does and you will not forget.’
    • ‘This is going to affect myself and other residents even more than it does already.’
    • ‘How can we expect change if the law says hitting children is acceptable, which it does now?’
  • 3Used to give emphasis to a positive verb:

    ‘I do want to act on this’
    ‘he did look tired’
    • ‘That more or less answers that question, but it does open up another can of worms.’
    • ‘In this case, the answers to the first two of these questions really does appear to be no.’
    • ‘It's a chilling and bizarre image, but it does answer the questions better than any other theory.’
    • ‘Which does rather raise the question of why the government didn't think of it two days ago.’
    • ‘But this still does beg a question as to what is in all this for the manufacturer.’
    • ‘I think there is a lot of truth in that statement even if it does paint an unflattering portrait.’
    • ‘Where the commandment does fall down is its lack of relevance to tenement life.’
    • ‘While not directly overlooked, the garden does look onto the side of another house.’
    • ‘In that statement she does indeed make the statement which is attributed to her.’
    • ‘For one thing, many Democrats seem to have forgotten that they did win the election last time.’
    • ‘The film has a positive message because Bella does find friendship and love.’
    • ‘However the parents do live in a rather affluent area outside of San Diego.’
    • ‘He did seem very tired in the bath though so I think we might need to work on his stamina.’
    • ‘However, the controversy does raise important questions over the use of technology in sport.’
    • ‘However, it does pose the age-old question of whether or not money can buy you happiness.’
    • ‘The Guardian does mention important and controversial issues, but only in passing.’
    • ‘Oh well, the tutor did mention she was interested in the reactions we would get.’
    • ‘In the final act, the film does deliver a few surprises, but by that point it's far too late.’
    • ‘If he does give evidence the question will depend on whether his evidence is believed.’
    • ‘It does beg the question of why they should go to all that effort though.’
    1. 3.1 Used in positive commands to give polite encouragement:
      ‘do tell me!’
      ‘do sit down’
      • ‘Do sit down and make yourself comfortable.’
      • ‘If you're in the Valley at that time, please do come to the event, it should be great.’
      • ‘‘Do tell me all about your visit,’ she continued.’
  • 4Used with inversion of a subject and verb when an adverbial phrase begins a clause for emphasis:

    ‘only rarely did they succumb’
    ‘not only did the play close, the theatre closed’
    • ‘Not alone did he encourage others to get involved but he is now the club's secretary.’
    • ‘Only at the turn of this year did he begin to secure headlines with his mouth shut.’
    • ‘She doesn't ask me anything, nor does she refer to The Incident With The Dolls.’
    • ‘He first searches to find where Josh is up to and only then does he begin to teach.’
    • ‘Rarely does a new Ring cycle begin with such confidence and lucidity, on stage and in the pit.’

noun

informal
  • 1British A party or other social event:

    ‘the soccer club Christmas do’
    • ‘She is a much sought after figure to grace social dos and functions even at the age of 80.’
    • ‘He had been Santa for nephews and nieces at family dos, and I thought he was very good.’
    • ‘We often have do's, birthday parties, anniversary's, and I'm nearly 96.’
    • ‘Charity dinners and celebrity dos for a cause are a trend these days - what better way to raise a big sum for a noble cause?’
    • ‘There was even an ongoing carnival and lots of gangs of women on hen dos, wearing rubbish outfits (and stupid deeley-bopper things on their heads), with even more rubbish shoes.’
    • ‘There's even a small selection of products for the hen and stag dos, including T-shirts featuring key words in diamanté on the front such as ‘Sexy bridesmaid’ and ‘Groom's mother’.’
    • ‘Such social dos are more or less confined to the well to do and the upwardly mobile class of young professionals.’
    • ‘They made careers out of being party girls, haunting the edges of posh dos and premieres.’
    • ‘She said: ‘We always used to feel like usurpers at those dos.’’
    • ‘‘The dinner he was invited to wasn't even one of our most important dos,’ the source said.’
    • ‘It was very seldom that he went out - only family functions or Christmas dos.’
    • ‘Jeff's workplace were having one of those dos where everyone in the company drinks beer and socialises - a pretty good idea when they all work in small teams that don't meet face to face - and Lucy and me tagged along.’
    • ‘In our area we have social events, sing songs and get-togethers and dos.’
    • ‘I once sold a year's use of a Jaguar at one of these dos for more than the car was worth, simply because two blokes in the room were each determined to prove that they were considerably richer than the other.’
    • ‘Hen and stag dos, birthdays and a lot of parties coming back again and again ensured that it was always swinging.’
    • ‘Usually, however, fundraisers become society dos with the ‘need-to-be-seen’ factor eclipsing social causes.’
    • ‘We have done so many dos for the family in the pub and we did his wedding for him and now his funeral.’
    • ‘Whereas it used to be places like Newcastle, Edinburgh now attracts busloads of stag dos.’
    • ‘But it hasn't all been boring work - I've had a couple of fun nights out at press dos: one at the Cinnamon Club - a fab Indian restaurant - to launch a new warming KY Jelly.’
    • ‘Mr Burnham, 55, said: ‘I'm a keen go-karter and because of that I get invited to some charity dos.’’
    party, reception, gathering, celebration, function, affair, event, social event, social occasion, social function, social
    soirée
    jump-up
    simcha
    levee
    bash, blowout, rave, shindig, shindy, shebang, junket
    rave-up, thrash, knees-up, jolly, beanfeast, bunfight, beano
    shivoo, rage, jollo
    jol
    ding-dong
    View synonyms
  • 2North American

    ‘a bowl-shaped do of perfect silky hair’
    short for hairdo
    • ‘I like your new do, Alex… very nice.’
    • ‘The women's hair is slicked back into boyish dos.’
    • ‘Local stylists offered bouffant 'dos in the shape of mushroom clouds.’
    • ‘The short 'do' really suits you!’
    • ‘These tongs are a great way to twist and bend your way to great new curly dos.’
    • ‘Rather than giving in to the elements, weatherproof your tresses with gorgeous off-the-face dos, like the three low-maintenance styles we've highlighted this month.’
    • ‘Jill loves African-inspired dos, so she has fun with looks like cornrows and twists and threaded styles.’
    • ‘My friends and I were all laughing and braiding each other's hair, twisting our strands into funky 'dos.’
  • 3[mass noun] Excrement:

    ‘the air was rancid with the smell of donkey doo’
    figurative ‘they'll be the first to come begging for help when the do hits the fan’
    • ‘Will somebody who puts the doo in a plastic bag, then ties it to a tree or leaves it on the side of a path, explain the logic behind that to me?’
    • ‘It would be funny if many visitors to their properties had dog do on their shoes.’
    • ‘Good thing they learned how to run the ball the last couple of years, or they'd really be in some deep doo.’
    • ‘Appealingly illustrated by Yelchin, subjects range from flowers about to release their seeds to birds eating berries that will be dropped off in their doo.’
    • ‘It is no wonder that the team is such a stinking pile of doo.’
    • ‘Save the Bay—don't let Maryland drown in chicken doo!’
    • ‘The company's in deep financial doo, so can be bought cheap.’
    • ‘She laughed when she discovered dog doo could be subjected to DNA testing to help stop the flow of canine excrement landing on the condo complex's property.’
  • 4archaic A swindle or hoax.

Phrases

  • be nothing to do with

    • see do
      be unconnected with, be unrelated to
      avoid, have no dealings with, have no truck with, avoid dealing with, have no contact with, steer clear of, give a wide berth to
      View synonyms
    • 1Be no business or concern of:

      ‘it's my decision—it's nothing to do with you’
      • ‘I always thought that it was nothing to do with me, that it was to do with other people's opinion.’
      • ‘As a businessman himself, he should obviously be able to draw the distinction between running a successful business for commercial gain and getting involved in something that is nothing to do with him.’
      • ‘It was nothing to do with anyone other than his family.’
      • ‘This is our concern alone, this is nothing to do with you!’
      • ‘It was between the clubs and they couldn't agree a price. It was nothing to do with me so I just ignored it.’
      • ‘We wanted to go with him for counselling but we were told our son was over 18 and it was nothing to do with us.’
      • ‘Every time MPs try to get answers from the Department of Health, we are told it is nothing to do with ministers.’
      • ‘Striker Andy Gray said: ‘We've got to do the business on the pitch, what goes on off it is nothing to do with us.’’
      be unconnected with, be unrelated to
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Be unconnected with:
        ‘he says his departure is nothing to do with the resignation calls’
        • ‘The ailments that he had - bronchitis, asthma, malaria - were nothing to do with war service so he had to live on a ten shillings-a-week pension.’
        • ‘The girl was nothing to do with what was going on, a completely innocent bystander hit by a stray bullet.’
        • ‘It is nothing to do with how fast you run, the power comes from the shoulders.’
        • ‘The Government preens itself about how well the economy is going, but that is nothing to do with what it has done.’
        • ‘According to an airport spokesperson, both of these flights were delayed because the planes were late arriving at the airport and were nothing to do with the fact that security guards were on strike at the same time.’
        • ‘But I can confirm it was nothing to do with drugs.’
        • ‘The reason it didn't work was nothing to do with how I looked, we just weren't right for each other.’
        • ‘I discovered I had some skills that I didn't realise were saleable - namely writing and speaking - which were nothing to do with my first career as an oil executive.’
        • ‘I went to the studio, and they asked me the most foolish questions that were nothing to do with animal welfare.’
        • ‘It was nothing to do with politics and everything to do with evidence.’
        be unconnected with, be unrelated to
        avoid, have no dealings with, have no truck with, avoid dealing with, have no contact with, steer clear of, give a wide berth to
        View synonyms
  • be to do with

    • Be concerned or connected with:

      ‘the problems are usually to do with family tension’
      • ‘The only thing that made me really unhappy in the period afterwards, where I actually got emotional, was to do with the kids.’
      • ‘Half the complaints received were to do with community care, 44 per cent children and families and the remaining of six per cent within other areas of the department.’
      • ‘It is a very spiritual activity as it is to do with seasonal change and the passage of time.’
      • ‘‘This age group is the most likely to be involved in a crash and we believe this is to do with inexperience,’ Mr Farrell said.’
      • ‘Much of this, he suspects, is to do with the Internet.’
      • ‘But this is not a financial matter, it is to do with health.’
      • ‘I had a hard time earning the respect of supporters, who thought his transfer was to do with me.’
      • ‘I have seen hair thinning in women who have dieted a lot and I think this is to do with poor vitamin and mineral intake.’
      • ‘I could tell that part of the silence was to do with how much weight I had lost.’
      • ‘‘I think a lot of it is to do with the confusion caused by having a General Election on the same day,’ he said.’
      relate to, apply to, be relevant to, have relevance to, concern, refer to, have reference to, belong to, pertain to, be pertinent to, bear on, have a bearing on, appertain to, affect, involve, cover, touch
      regard
      View synonyms
  • do a ——

    • informal Behave in a manner characteristic of (a specified person):

      ‘he did a Garbo after his flop in the play’
      • ‘I am not doing a Germaine Greer or Betty Friedan.’
      • ‘The leading actors even wore the correct underwear beneath their historically researched costumes - known in the trade as doing a von Stroheim, because Erich von Stroheim insisted on undie realism in 1924 for Greed.’
      • ‘I thought Knight was doing an Anastacia as this album opened to the rock-tinged tune of her latest single Come As You Are.’
      • ‘I am not doing an Arsene Wenger, but I did not see the incident that led to his first booking.’
      • ‘So without doing a Walt Whitman, I'm now going to self-refer.’
      • ‘As I pictured him doing a Travis Bickle through the urine reeking, hashish infested streets of Madrid, I felt like paraphrasing Oscar Wilde, one would have to have a heart of stone not to laugh at the man.’
      • ‘He was caught on camera doing a Vinny Jones on St Mirren striker Mark Yardley.’
      • ‘Anyway, old Neb thought he was the greatest wonder of the world, especially after doing an Alan Titchmarsh on the Hanging Gardens of Babylon.’
      • ‘People will naturally say, ‘Ah, motor racing, money, TV - it's a money-spinning exercise; he's doing a Simon Cowell’.’
      • ‘Anyway, surely, if he wanted to make it truly dramatic, he should have tried doing a Richard Hannay and hanging off the clock hands.’
  • do battle

    • Enter into a conflict:

      ‘they are about to do battle with Canada's retail food industry’
      ‘I was ready and eager to do battle’
      • ‘The newer generation was impatient and ready to do battle in many different ways.’
      • ‘Religion has to accommodate science and not do battle against it.’
      • ‘Shocked residents are preparing to do battle amid fears that there are plans to site a mobile phone mast at Burley's cricket club.’
      • ‘On the day of the storm, linemen and other employees put in a regular eight-hour workday, then prepared to do battle.’
      • ‘It was inevitable that the two opposing armies would do battle, but how could they fight each other while a more pressing engagement was afoot?’
  • don't —— me

    • informal Do not use the word —— to me:

      ‘‘Don't morning me. Where the hell've you been all night?’’
      • ‘‘Whatever, Mindy… whatever,’ he muttered. ‘No, don't whatever me! I want to know the truth!’’
      • ‘‘Don't hello me,’ I reply, ‘You think that you can slander me in the paper and then act as though everything is ok?’’
      • ‘Don't sorry me, go down and apologize.’
  • do one

    • informal [in imperative]Go away:

      ‘look, just do one, will you!’
      • ‘So do me a favour and go do one.’
      • ‘Why don't you just do one. You're a waste of time.’
  • do or die

    • 1Persist, even if death is the result:

      ‘a grim determination to do or die’
      • ‘Some of these players are not prepared to do or die for York and I need to draft players in who are.’
      • ‘He seemed determined to do or die on the last day of combat.’
      • ‘This was how to live, on the edge, ready to do or die, with no safety rope to haul you back in.’
      • ‘When he set off to make the 7000-mile trip alone, Mr Halsey swore he would ‘do or die’.’
      • ‘They are Indian companies with not so much of a global market or mindshare, but with a determination to do or die.’
      1. 1.1Used to describe a critical situation where one's actions may result in victory or defeat:
        ‘the 72nd hole was do or die’
        • ‘For the England fans before the match the game against the Germans was do or die.’
        • ‘This election was do or die for them.’
        • ‘His incredible death or glory hundred, in a do or die qualification battle for India at the Sinhalese Sports Club Stadium left the Kiwis rubbing their eyes in sheer disbelief.’
        • ‘‘At this point it's basically a do or die situation as we are right on the edge of making play-offs,’ explained Paul.’
        • ‘‘Everything for us is do or die,’ she explained.’
        • ‘You know this is do or die - if you lose, you're done.’
        • ‘Yes, it was important, but not a do or die situation, as is portrayed by the president's political rivals.’
        • ‘It was literally do or die for the print media and something had to give.’
        • ‘Every game is a must-win situation, creating a do or die atmosphere with each contest.’
        • ‘‘It's pretty much do or die, and your competitiveness comes out,’ he said.’
  • dos and don'ts

    • Rules of behaviour:

      ‘I have no knowledge of the political dos and don'ts’
      • ‘As part of this programme, hostel cooks were taught the dos and don'ts of purchasing vegetables, serving food, preserving food and raw material.’
      • ‘It's as easy to take a good picture as it is to take a bad one, if the photographer is aware of a few basic dos and don'ts.’
      • ‘We are given some dos and don'ts that must be followed over the coming weeks’
      • ‘Here are some dos and don'ts once you land in the U.S.’
      • ‘Rattled by this experience and not knowing what he had done to offend, our visitor asked me for some guidance on the dos and don'ts of the local culture.’
      • ‘They see religion as a mere list of dos and don'ts, and little else.’
      • ‘However, we are happy to explain the dos and don'ts to anybody who wants guidance.’
      • ‘What's more, there are some quite complicated rituals governing the dos and don'ts of everyday interaction.’
      • ‘I'd say I've become more confident and learnt the dos and don'ts of the industry.’
      • ‘There are a few dos and don'ts when it comes to preparing and cooking sprouts.’
  • do well for oneself

    • Become successful or wealthy:

      ‘her friend had done well for herself since she'd moved to London’
      • ‘I wanted to do well for myself and for my parents who did not have the opportunity to attend college.’
      • ‘But I always say that I will never worry about her survival skills, I know she'll always do well for herself in the long-term.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, Harper's Bazaar isn't the only fashion magazine that did well for itself in the second half of 2002.’
      • ‘The town was founded in 1874, and it did well for itself thanks to a small, oily, bony fish called menhaden.’
      • ‘Willy insisted that because Bernard was not well liked, he would not do well for himself when he grew up.’
      • ‘To do well for myself, I have to create a product or service that is positive and desirable for others.’
      • ‘Such thinking led him to start his own firm, Eugene Meyer and Company, which opened in 1904, and gradually, he began to make his mark on Wall Street and to do well for himself and his associates.’
      • ‘It has managed to do well for itself over the years, and today continues to seek new strategic partners.’
      • ‘A bank with access to this market can do well for itself by offering credit at 25 percent.’
      • ‘We can't support her - and she will totally screw up a terrific opportunity to do well for herself.’
  • do well out of

    • Make a profit out of; benefit from:

      ‘they're doing well out of scrap metal’
      • ‘Although Edinburgh and Glasgow continue to do well out of tourism, due partly to their good transport links and conference business, rural Scotland has suffered a big decline in the last two or three years.’
      • ‘Only the promoters, their advisers and the Queensland Government do well out of investment properties in the Deep North.’
      • ‘Pubs which opened early to serve drinks and breakfast to fans did well out of the World Cup.’
      • ‘Major financial and commercial centres such as London and Amsterdam also did well out of long-distance trades.’
      • ‘The west Midlands campaign, limited so far to the Birmingham elite and chattering classes, has been partly fuelled by a sense that north Wales is doing well out of devolution.’
      • ‘You only have to look at the recent profit results of resources companies to realise Australia is doing well out of the commodities boom.’
      • ‘The only people doing well out of such lawsuits are the lawyers.’
      • ‘Markets are seen as a very positive step in bringing people in, and I hope the traders and local shopkeepers do well out of it.’
      • ‘They have an almost a-political attitude: providing they are doing well out of the economy they are not much interested in what is happening in politics.’
      • ‘Even though we are, by any standards, doing well out of Europe, we have difficulty making the final commitment to the single currency, just as our nerve has failed at every stage in the evolution of post-war Europe.’
  • have (got) —— to do with

    • 1Be connected with (someone or something) to the extent specified:

      ‘John's got nothing to do with that terrible murder’
      • ‘I used to be in the Forces for five years and that might have something to do with how calm I was.’
      • ‘The problem has nothing to do with too much tax or too few incentives.’
      • ‘They tried to make a big deal out of it, but the truth is that the governor had nothing to do with that.’
      • ‘This has nothing to do with how much faith you have or how you feel.’
      • ‘He sees himself as a pioneer in the field he has chosen, which actually has nothing to do with what he did in college.’
      • ‘This could have something to do with why a lot of people don't see any importance in marriage.’
      • ‘Perhaps this has something to do with why I failed as an architecture student.’
      • ‘Players do not like criticism and maybe that had something to do with what happened today.’
      • ‘He told a jury at Sheffield Crown Court yesterday he had nothing to do with either the murders or the shooting.’
      • ‘She wondered if the long dry hot weather may have something to do with what she was seeing.’
      1. 1.1Have no contact or dealings with:
        ‘Billy and his father have had nothing to do with each other for nearly twenty years’
        • ‘And the God who is invoked in justification of these is a God I wish to have nothing to do with.’
        • ‘He can tell me that Jack is just some stupid Junior that I should have nothing to do with.’
        • ‘If the father wants to have nothing to do with the baby then he may or may not mind the mother having an abortion.’
        • ‘I suggest you two shake hands and apologize now, or I will have nothing to do with either of you again!’
        • ‘It is a sweet tale of a boy in love with a girl whose father will let her have nothing to do with him.’
        • ‘The funny thing is, he left a pregnant girl in New Zealand and will have nothing to do with the child he fathered.’
        steer clear of, avoid, shun, evade, eschew, shy away from, fight shy of, recoil from, keep away from, keep one's distance from, give a wide berth to, leave alone
        snub, give someone the cold shoulder, cold-shoulder, ignore, turn one's back on
        View synonyms
  • it isn't done

    • Used to express the opinion that a particular thing contravenes custom or propriety:

      ‘in such a society it is not done to admit to taking religion seriously’
      • ‘When you're pulling in $20 million a movie, it isn't done to ask exactly how long you spent in architecture school!’
      • ‘It isn't done to speak ill of the dead.’
      • ‘But someone should tell him that it isn't done to talk about one's son as one would about a prized racehorse at a stud farm.’
      • ‘In France bills are expected to be paid by the due date – it is not done to wait for the 'final warning' letter!’
  • it won't do

    • Used to express the opinion that a particular person's behaviour is unsatisfactory and cannot be allowed to continue:

      ‘Can't have that kind of talk—I've told you before, it won't do’
      • ‘I know that I am still recovering from fatigue, but I can use tiredness as an excuse and that just will not do.’
      • ‘It simply will not do for an elected government to fob people off with clichés and half truths.’
  • no you don't!

    • informal Used to indicate that one intends to prevent someone from doing what they were about to do:

      ‘Sharon went to get in the taxi. ‘Oh no you don't’, said Steve’
      • ‘‘Oh no you don't!’ I shouted, jumping for the door before he could.’
      • ‘No you don't lad. Let William and Jack go after them.’
  • that does it!

    • informal Used to indicate that one will not tolerate a particular thing any longer:

      ‘That does it! Let's go!’
      • ‘‘Well, that does it!’ Tyler said. He brushed past Josh and out of the room.’
      • ‘That does it! I quit!’
      • ‘All right, that does it! I want to know what's behind that door.’
      • ‘That does it, I'm going to bed.’
      • ‘I was already deciding whether to unlock the door or not, but that does it! I'll stay here until it kills me, do you hear?’
  • that's done it!

    • informal Used to express dismay or anger when something has gone wrong.

      • ‘‘Uh oh, that's done it,’ he said. ‘We've got to get off this ship ASAP!’’
      • ‘‘That's done it!’ said a growl from the crackling intercom system. ‘Our energy transfer unit just had a stroke.’’
      • ‘Oh hell, that's done it.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • do away with

    • 1Put an end to; remove:

      ‘the desire to do away with racism’
      • ‘We should learn instead from New Zealand, which did away with virtually all its agricultural subsidies and trade barriers in the mid-1980s.’
      • ‘It said: ‘The whole purpose of this initiative as we understood it is to save money by doing away with, or at least cutting down on things like order books.’’
      • ‘The government will this week unveil a plan to abolish red tape for business and consumers, doing away with thousands of petty laws and rules, and streamlining all regulations.’
      • ‘If there are scratches, you can use polish cleaner and scratch remover to do away with them.’
      • ‘Perhaps Leeds City Council should do away with pedestrian crossings and rely on the traffic to stop and allow us to cross the road safely.’
      • ‘Lewis said the merger would cut costs by erasing 6,000 jobs and doing away with overlapping technology and marketing expenses.’
      • ‘It seems they are always looking for things to change or do away with.’
      • ‘New packaging technologies could finally do away with the family butcher.’
      • ‘It can take the pressure off Dublin Airport and do away with the necessity for a second terminal at an already overcrowded airport and city.’
      • ‘During his time at the Central Bank he dined in the staff restaurant and did away with the executive dining room.’
      abolish, quash, get rid of, discard, remove, eliminate, discontinue, cancel, stop, end, terminate, put an end to, put a stop to, call a halt to, dispense with, drop, abandon, give up
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Kill:
        ‘he didn't have the courage to do away with her’
        • ‘Many of the participants were on the ground, searching for other victims to do away with.’
        • ‘Without further ado the king hires an assassin to do away with him, solving all sorts of problems in one deathly stroke.’
        • ‘If Jade could try to get rid of George, what would stop her from doing away with David?’
        • ‘He is set to harm the young lady whom you shelter, and do away with all those who hold her in their hearts, be they kith or kin.’
        • ‘While awaiting trial, many accused murderers do away with themselves by hanging.’
        • ‘Antonia will do away with Barry, and Rose will return the favor by knocking off Hector.’
        kill, put to death, do to death, put an end to, finish off, take the life of, end the life of, murder, assassinate, execute, slaughter, butcher, wipe out, mow down, shoot down, cut down
        View synonyms
  • do by

    • Treat or deal with in a specified way:

      ‘do as you would be done by’
      ‘she did well by them’
      • ‘If he had done badly by her he knows I'd put his teeth halfway down his throat.’
      • ‘Then he began to have a faint inkling that he was being treated leniently, and to think that they had done kindly by him, in not yielding to his wish.’
      • ‘My mother, bless her soul, had done well by me in making me learn to sew at an early age.’
  • do someone/thing down

    • 1Get the better of someone, typically in an underhand way:

      ‘if you're a manager trying to do down a colleague, the best way to do it is to flood them with data’
      • ‘He never faced a room full of twenty-first century youngsters who, at best, would rather be at home playing Playstation games and, at worst, were determined to do him down.’
      • ‘For a while there were rumours of a Labor rat out to do him down.’
      • ‘There is no small irony in the fact that he has been done down by the very forces he sought to win over to New Labour and whom he believed respected him for his authoritarianism and readiness to trample on democratic rights.’
      • ‘Two years ago they did us down in the same stadium and, since then, their star has been rising and rising.’
      • ‘‘He brings great rigour to his arguments and if others cannot do the same they will be done down,’ said one financier.’
      • ‘Were the Gods contriving to do us down once more on the major stage of a Munster championship day?’
      • ‘Never one to undervalue his own importance, he was able to face his public humiliation because he knew in his own mind that he had been done down by petty, smallminded people, not a match for his abilities and foresight.’
      1. 1.1Criticize someone or something:
        ‘they're always moaning and doing British industry down’
        • ‘We don't want to do our country down, but please don't act as if we've got the problems under control.’
        • ‘The magazine's got a cheek to revel in London's victory when it always does its very best to do our city down.’
        • ‘It's ironic that one of our own should be doing us down again.’
        • ‘It also comes hot on the heels of allegations filtering back to the Maryhill area that certain other first division managers have been actively doing his side down in the press.’
        • ‘They always had faith in him despite the so-called experts who were only willing to do him down.’
        belittle, disparage, denigrate, run down, deprecate, depreciate, cast aspersions on, discredit, vilify, defame, decry, criticize, abuse, insult, malign
        slur
        do a hatchet job on, take to pieces, take apart, pull apart, pick holes in, drag through the mud, have a go at, hit out at, knock, slam, pan, bash, bad-mouth, look down one's nose at
        rubbish, slate, slag off
        asperse, derogate, minify
        View synonyms
  • do for

    • Defeat, ruin, or kill:

      ‘without that contract we're done for’
      ‘it was the cold that did for him in the end’
      • ‘That defeat all but did for their already slim chances of progressing.’
      • ‘‘Don't worry, they're done for,’ Sean said, his heartbeat starting to slow to normal pace.’
      • ‘Now the blooms are limp, and soaked through, and I fear they are done for.’
      • ‘"Well," Ren said, shifting her weight to the other foot, "when he realized that the ship was done for, he appeared absolutely ecstatic."’
      • ‘The foolish state of excitement into which I allowed myself to get the other day completely did for me, and I have hardly done anything since.’
      ruin, destroy, reduce to nothing, spoil, mar, injure, blight, shatter, scotch, mess up
      kill, cause the death of, end the life of, take the life of, finish off
      View synonyms
  • do something (or nothing) for

    • Enhance (or detract from) the appearance or quality of:

      ‘whatever the new forum does for industry, it certainly does something for the Minister’
      ‘that scarf does nothing for you’
      • ‘Why would she choose to wear such a horrendously unflattering dress? It just does nothing for her.’
      • ‘It's a color that does nothing for you.’
      • ‘That hairstyle does nothing for you, Kat.’
  • do someone in

    • 1Kill someone:

      ‘oh my God, she's done him in’
      • ‘Did you come here to see if I was alright or to finish the job of doing me in?’
      • ‘He tried to have some generals arrested, and some formed a conspiracy to do him in.’
      • ‘Some believe she was done in for planning to marry into a successful Arab merchant family.’
      • ‘And most people were convinced that he would be done in.’
      • ‘How he died, when he died, and whether he was done in by his comrades, fearful of another purge, all remain a mystery to this day.’
      • ‘The amount we consume, what we consume, and how much we consume at one time is doing us in.’
      • ‘They are lurking on every street corner, plotting to do us in.’
      • ‘Tuesday Cathy Jamieson was convinced that there's a plot to do her in, after the BBC did an undercover job on the private prison at Kilmarnock.’
      • ‘Some young men were setting up their instruments, and as another puff of smoke drifted toward Francesca, she hollered, ‘I'm going to go get some air-this smoke is doing me in!’’
      • ‘Thinking kings rarely prosper: Chaucer's patron Richard II was done in; ditto Charles I, a collector of art more voracious even than Charles Saatchi.’
      kill, put to death, do to death, put an end to, finish off, take the life of, end the life of, murder, assassinate, execute, slaughter, butcher, wipe out, mow down, shoot down, cut down
      kill, put to death, do to death, put an end to, finish off, take the life of, end the life of, murder, assassinate, execute, slaughter, butcher, wipe out, mow down, shoot down, cut down
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Be tired out:
        ‘there was 1 minute 4 seconds to play and the Lions were done in’
        • ‘Maybe they would have been done in by a running game that produced a measly 2.9 yards per carry.’
        • ‘He says that the 2001 Lions were done in by all the travelling and inadequate rest periods: his meticulous planning will prevent a similar fate this time.’
        • ‘I had hoped she would feel like going with us but she was done in by three days of greater than usual activity.’
        wear out, tire out, exhaust, fatigue, weary, overtire, drain, prostrate, enervate, devitalize
        View synonyms
  • do something in

    • Injure something:

      ‘I did my back in a few years ago’
      • ‘I did my ankle in on the second day and had to go home early.’
      • ‘I know my dad hated not working when he did his shoulder in.’
      • ‘She did her knee in about 3 years ago playing tennis.’
      • ‘In March of that year, I did my back in, and for the first time in my life I realised what it meant to be housebound.’
      injure, hurt, damage, maim, cripple, disable, paralyse
      View synonyms
  • do someone out of

    • Deprive someone of (something) in an underhand or unfair way:

      ‘she was always chasing him about money, as if he was trying to do her out of her share’
      • ‘He became convinced that other officers were doing him out of his just rewards: the prize money for capturing enemy ships.’
      • ‘They both laughed when I told them how much I had paid for it, saying I had been done out of a gold piece.’
      • ‘‘Because all the other detox models have a full 24-hour-a-day doctor presence, some doctors think we're doing them out of a job,’ Maxwell says.’
      • ‘He also alleged that he had been done out of 60 million shares by one of the bank's three largest shareholders.’
      • ‘German resellers are the least worried in Europe that large retailers could do them out of business and sales.’
      • ‘The Australian controllers are doing them out of a job.’
      • ‘You're doing them out of their bread-and-butter here.’
      • ‘Also, I can't imagine that professional caddies will like them as they could do them out of employment.’
      • ‘The man would not do you out of a cent and it would certainly not have been his intention to rob anyone.’
      • ‘Senior officers in MI6 feel deeply threatened by this technology because it effectively does them out of a job.’
      swindle out of, cheat out of, trick out of, prevent from having, prevent from gaining, deprive of, dispossess of, rob of, strip of, relieve of
      con out of, diddle out of
      View synonyms
  • do something out

    • Decorate or furnish a room or building in a particular style, colour, or material:

      ‘the basement is done out in limed oak’
      • ‘She was told it was a girl, bought all pink, did the room out in pink and had a boy.’
      • ‘It's done out in dark wood and the lighting was subdued, with no candles to add a little sparkle.’
      • ‘The whole place is done out in an Egyptian style.’
      • ‘It's a steep climb, but worth it: the rooms are done out in an original Indo-Ligurian style and, best of all, both houses share a well-kept terrace garden, sandwiched between the castle and the crashing waves below.’
      decorate, furnish, adorn, ornament, embellish
      deck out, trick out, trim
      do up
      tart up
      View synonyms
  • do someone over

    • Beat someone up:

      ‘let's do them over and dump them somewhere’
      • ‘He suddenly pulled out a gun and confronted Mr Thompson over some men being ‘sent to do him over.’’
      • ‘With some people, if they get cross they make a threat and say they'll punch you or do you over if you do it again.’
      • ‘I've realised with a certain sort of delight that I'm now so old that nobody can earn any sort of reputation from doing me over.’
      • ‘‘She looked like she had been done over by Mike Tyson,’ added Caroline.’
      • ‘‘We could do you over,’ a shy-looking boy with dark hair added loudly before retreating back into the hood on his jacket.’
      • ‘Half the time you can't go into the playground because someone will do you over, and if they don't get you in school they get you on the way home.’
      • ‘Also, I am quite a nice person who would not do you over should you reveal some home truths.’
      beat up, assault, attack, mug, batter, thrash, pummel, pound
      knock about, knock around, work over, clobber, rough up, fill in, beat the living daylights out of, let someone have it
      have a go at, duff someone up
      beat up on
      View synonyms
  • do something over

    • 1Ransack a place, especially while searching for something worth stealing:

      ‘Jacqui's flat had been done over—the evidence was all too clear’
      • ‘My house still looks as if it's been done over by a gang of particularly thorough burglars.’
      • ‘When he arrived back from Geneva last Saturday he found his house had been done over.’
      • ‘Vandals have also done over his shop.’
    • 2Decorate or furnish a room or building:

      ‘a two-room flat done over by a local designer’
      • ‘She did the house over -- completely, with the exception of the room he'd used for a study.’
      • ‘He just sticks his head in the door and loudly proclaims ‘I did my kitchen over today as well and it's much better than this.’’
      • ‘It was bought about a year ago by an outfit called Country Club Luxury Hotels and has been completely done over.’
      • ‘I feel like those people on TV getting their houses done over by expensive designers.’
    • 3Repeat something:

      ‘to absorb the lesson, I had to do it over and over’
      • ‘Though Mary Jane made the artist do the face over, the expression did not improve.’
      • ‘Why do something over and over if the result never changes?’
      • ‘Even simple choices can have huge consequences, and we never get to do things over!’
      • ‘If you could do it over, what would be your debut album?’
      • ‘If you could do it over again right now, what would you have fixed?’
      • ‘The best compromise was always just to do it over.’
      • ‘He pried the board free and then, glowering, he did the job over.’
      • ‘They saw the dailies, and they came back a couple weeks later, and they said, ‘We'd like to do that scene over, and we'd like you to be more passionate.’’
      • ‘Brown says he's proud of his three-story, three-bedroom home; but if he had to do it over, he'd have budgeted better and saved more money before jumping into buying the house.’
      • ‘If it doesn't come loose the first time you may have to do it over a few times until you can easily unscrew the old chuck.’
  • do up

    • Be able to be fastened:

      ‘a shirt so tight that not all of the buttons did up’
      • ‘My jeans won't do up anymore.’
      • ‘It is buttoned down the front with five buttons, which also do up the men's way, and which are 10.5 cm apart, centre to centre.’
      • ‘I have put on so much weight that my posh dress won't actually do up at the back without making me look like I am a Diana Dors replicant that is carrying triplets’
      • ‘I have a whole rack of jeans that for some reason do not do up.’
      • ‘Some bras on the market now do up at the front.’
  • do someone up

    • Dress someone up, especially in an elaborate or impressive way:

      ‘Agnes was all done up in a slinky black number’
      • ‘Lizzy and Jane were done up nicely if discreetly.’
      • ‘‘You don't look so bad yourself,’ Heather replied, realizing that Martha was done up.’
      • ‘She was poked, prodded, and pinned until she was done up in one of the most elaborate gowns she'd ever worn.’
      • ‘A group of teenage girls got on, all done up in glitter, crop tops and tight jeans.’
      • ‘I decided she needed to go out clubbing and did her up in a cute punk style.’
  • do something up

    • 1Fasten something:

      ‘she drew on her coat and did up the buttons’
      • ‘Barely able to do up his buttons because of the swelling, he nevertheless ‘managed to get through’ that day's matinee and evening show before being strapped up at hospital.’
      • ‘I took 30 minutes to put on my shirt and do up the buttons and gave up on the tie and shoelaces.’
      • ‘It was refreshing to be able to do up clips and buckles and perform tasks without everything becoming mission impossible.’
      • ‘She does her coat up and slowly makes for the door then stops.’
      • ‘One day I walked in and my top button wasn't done up, he gave the class and me an entire lecture about appearance.’
      • ‘He does his coat up.’
      • ‘The gist was this: children arriving in primary school are no better than savages - unable to do up buttons, use a knife and fork, sit still or even speak.’
      • ‘Their top buttons were done up, and stayed that way.’
      • ‘Carl studied her for a moment and then nodded ‘You need to do up another button on your blouse and here,’ Carl handed her a security ‘visitor’ identification badge.’
      • ‘Practise doing up buttons and fastening his shoes, but don't worry or pressure him if this proves too difficult.’
      fasten, tie, tie up, lace, knot, make a knot in, tie a bow in
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Arrange one's hair in a particular way, especially so as to be pulled back from one's face or shoulders:
        ‘her dark hair was done up in a pony tail’
        • ‘She went all out in getting dressed in the mornings, doing up her hair and powdering her face.’
        • ‘However, we can easily guess his social status from his elaborate coiffure: in the manner of high-ranking men, his hair is done up in a topknot, kept in place by an ornamental hairpin.’
        • ‘I did my hair up in a high ponytail and went out to have some breakfast.’
        • ‘The dress went down midway past her knees, and her hair was done up in a complex braid.’
        • ‘After a day of scrubbing, applying make-up, and sitting still while mother did our hair up, we were ready.’
        • ‘She had several ropes of long black beads around her neck which she absent-mindedly played with in her hand, and her thin hair was done up in an elaborate style.’
        • ‘Betty was all dressed up in pink, and her hair was done up with fake flowers.’
        • ‘Rosalie looked very relaxed and content and was wearing a blue summer halter dress and her hair was done up in a loose chignon.’
        • ‘Finally ready she slipped on some simple slippers and did her hair up in a loose braid, opting to skip any head pieces for now.’
        • ‘Ashley even did my hair up in a chignon with hair falling to the sides of my face.’
      2. 1.2Wrap something up:
        ‘unwieldy packs all done up with string’
        • ‘The shopkeeper did up the parcel, handed it me across the counter, took the half-dollar coin I gave him, and I left the shop.’
        • ‘She arrived one snowy day with a shapeless parcel done up in tissue-paper.’
        • ‘She held out a brightly wrapped package done up with gold ribbon and a sparkling golden bow.’
    • 2Renovate or redecorate a room or building:

      ‘Mrs Hamilton did the place up for letting’
      • ‘We were now living in a house that was a building site, with no money to do it up.’
      • ‘‘We have put so much into doing up this place,’ said Paula, a health visitor.’
      • ‘People here are also spending more than most other parts of the country on doing up their homes.’
      • ‘After spending a lot of money doing up our house, we decided to remortgage.’
      • ‘For the past fortnight, some builders have been doing up the flat next door.’
      • ‘Greenwood has bought a small village house that needs doing up.’
      • ‘They claim to have spent about £115,000 doing up the flat.’
      • ‘Tony did building work on houses his father had bought and was doing up to sell on, but he also worked for other construction companies.’
      • ‘There has been an explosion of local landscaping and building contractors who are making a very good living from doing up these estates.’
      • ‘I put more than £20,000 of my own capital into buying and doing up a place in Fulham, but I sold it too soon to recoup the outlay, just a year later.’
      renovate, refurbish, refit, restore, redecorate, decorate, revamp, make over, modernize, improve, spruce up, smarten up, brighten up, prettify, enhance
      View synonyms
  • do with

    • 1[with modal]Would find useful or would like to have or do:

      ‘I could do with a cup of coffee’
      • ‘Kingsley was a tall, dark, wiry man with messy grey hair that looked as if it could do with a wash.’
      • ‘Though I could possibly have done with it being in Mayfair, I may have been all of about two minutes less late.’
      • ‘Much of our architecture could do with a splash of luxury.’
      • ‘I could have really done with a team of flying reindeer and a sleigh tonight, to shift me from London to Glasgow.’
      • ‘I could do with a break before the exams begin in late May.’
      1. 1.1British Be unwilling to tolerate or be bothered with:
        ‘she couldn't be doing with meals for one’
        • ‘He often records versions of traditional tunes on his records, but can't be doing with the stuffiness some folksters exude.’
        • ‘I can't be doing with all these patches and strips of neatly cut grass.’
        • ‘I can't be doing with all that faffing about in the kitchen.’
        • ‘And I can't be doing with trying to achieve the wow factor on a budget.’
        • ‘No, I can't be doing with these sudden blasts of heat.’
        • ‘I can't be doing with all the big parties and all that rubbish.’
        • ‘I can't be doing with all that pomp and ceremony.’
        • ‘I can't be doing with thinking about Christmas yet.’
        • ‘I just think that's so desperately boring and I can't be doing with that.’
        • ‘And I couldn't be doing with all that hierarchy, ‘Yes, Chef’, ‘No, Chef’.’
  • do without

    • 1[with modal]Manage without:

      ‘she could do without food for a day’
      • ‘Space has to be found for everything, even if it means the principal does without an office, a desk or even a seat.’
      • ‘I explained that doing without food was the key element here.’
      • ‘She had tried, unsuccessfully, to give up the habit on several occasions; the best she had achieved was doing without cigarettes for a couple of weeks at a time.’
      • ‘The rest of the crew had set off from San Francisco around the same time as us but were manfully doing without sleep and so were around 10 hours ahead of us.’
      • ‘Twenty-one percent did without food to try to pay their bills.’
      • ‘A crucifying mortgage bill can be avoided if you decide to wait and do without your dream home for a few years.’
      • ‘What is the one organic food or drink product you can't do without?’
      • ‘She does without herbicides as well, preferring to weed by hand.’
      • ‘Try doing without cigs, booze and satellite TV, then the children would have fresh veg, meat and warm clothing for winter.’
      • ‘This story goes a little further because the couple says that they actually enjoy their sacrifices, speaking as though saving money and doing without things like a DVD player and cell phone are part of an enjoyable game.’
      forgo, dispense with, abstain from, refrain from, eschew, give up, renounce, forswear, swear off, keep off, keep away from, manage without
      lay off, cut out, quit, give something a miss
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1informal Would prefer not to have:
        ‘I can do without your carping first thing in the morning’
        • ‘I had become so unreliable, unpredictable and frankly, an embarrassment they could do without.’
        • ‘I could do without the occasional looks of pity I've had from them.’
        • ‘Determined to make a go of their new life, they decide that women are a distraction they can do without and swear off them for three years.’
        • ‘Although from my point of view as a manager, this is something I could do without, full stop.’
        • ‘I'm sure he can do without the extra humiliation.’

Origin

Old English dōn, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch doen and German tun, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek tithēmi I place and Latin facere make, do.

Pronunciation:

do

/duː/

Main definitions of do in English

: do1do2

do2

noun

  • variant spelling of doh

Pronunciation:

do

/duː/