Definition of divine right of kings in English:

divine right of kings

noun

  • The doctrine that kings derive their authority from God not their subjects, from which it follows that rebellion is the worst of political crimes. It was enunciated in Britain in the 16th and 17th centuries under the Stuarts and is also associated with the absolutism of Louis XIV of France.

    • ‘Between the divine right of kings and the territorial powers of priests, the legality of pre-modern states took shape.’
    • ‘Until then, there was the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘Also, didn't the divine right of kings fall out of favour some centuries ago?’
    • ‘Chinese political theory, for example, never accepted the divine right of kings, as did the Europeans.’
    • ‘Shotuku appeals neither to ‘self-evident truths’ (as in the American Constitution) nor to some divine right of kings as the basis of law.’
    • ‘The divine right of kings was a short-lived political theory, swept under by rival theories in early modern times.’
    • ‘Charles I was fighting for the divine right of kings, an absolutist faith which allowed neither compromise nor qualification.’
    • ‘He ridiculed the concept of the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘At one time the majority of people believed in the divine right of kings, slavery, and human sacrifice to propitiate the gods.’
    • ‘Such demands clearly challenged Charles' belief in the divine right of kings to govern as they saw fit.’
    • ‘Is it the divine right of kings or of democratic politics?’
    • ‘It is an idea invented by politicians for politicians, a modern adaptation of the doctrine of the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘This absolute pardon power comes from the divine right of kings, that kings can do no wrong.’
    • ‘James was a strong believer in the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘Despite enduring a sickly childhood Charles matured into a strong-willed Stuart monarch and an advocate of the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘Enthusiasm for the divine right of kings dovetailed neatly with other theories stressing the sacred nature of monarchy.’
    • ‘That sure smacked of the divine right of kings and condemnation of the rebels of the Puritan revolution.’
    • ‘High churchmen flourished under the later Stuarts because of their insistence on the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘Here's David Hume trying to find a moral theory for equality in world that only knew the divine right of kings.’
    • ‘She took a high view of her royal prerogative, and held as robust a belief in the divine right of kings as her father and successor.’