Definition of disuse in English:

disuse

noun

  • [mass noun] The state of not being used:

    ‘his voice was croaky with disuse’
    • ‘The paper reports the device was placed in a building at an electrical station that had been in disuse for around ten years.’
    • ‘Only real spiritual power has become rusty through prolonged disuse.’
    • ‘These are clues, but all are disconnected by their season of disuse.’
    • ‘It's been in disuse for the last few years - war superseded their need for it.’
    • ‘The ankle high grass that surrounds the building and the closed doors and windows indicated past and current disuse respectively.’
    • ‘Most of these, however, are either in disuse or are seldom operated.’
    • ‘It's a notion that has gone into disuse over the last ten or 15 years.’
    • ‘In addition, I have started on some abdominals and have dusted off my ab wheel which was becoming more of a piece of garbage on account of disuse.’
    • ‘This was all in high school, and years of disuse and neglect have made my Spanish skills rustier than a Gary, Indiana steel mill.’
    • ‘It remains the case, however, that the term itself has fallen largely into disuse, especially within professional circles.’
    • ‘After more than a decade of disuse since being given a half-million pound revamp, plans are afoot to open part of Hellifield Station in time for Easter.’
    • ‘Another such symbol of triumph is the Richards Town Park, which was in a state of disuse and used as a den by drug addicts about eight years ago.’
    • ‘Most of the money is being used for refurbishing properties which have fallen into disrepair and disuse.’
    • ‘It was revived yesterday after years of disuse to coincide with the opening of the area's new police headquarters at Whitebirk.’
    • ‘But it still had an air of recent disuse, despite the best efforts of the team from World Snooker to get the venue ready.’
    • ‘However, the ancient Egyptians, who made good bread themselves, did not abandon barley; and it did not fall into general disuse.’
    • ‘Everything about it breathes disuse: the rusting iron grille in front of the main door, the lack of any sign.’
    • ‘Vehicles lying in disuse in open space, waiting for the lengthy trial procedures to be completed, often become scrap having no value.’
    • ‘Now after many years of disuse, it will be a centre celebrating the unique cultural wealth of the Irish and Irish in America.’
    • ‘It's been so long since we had a good operation that the equipment is deteriorating - not through wear and tear, but through disuse.’
    non-use, non-employment, lack of use
    neglect, abandonment, desertion
    cessation, discontinuance, obsolescence
    desuetude
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

disuse

/dɪsˈjuːs/