Definition of distrait in English:

distrait

Pronunciation /ˈdɪstreɪ//dɪˈstreɪ/

adjective

  • predicative Distracted or absent-minded.

    ‘he seemed oddly distrait’
    • ‘She towers over most human beings (myself included) and there's a distrait quality about her eyes.’
    • ‘But, as someone about to construct a bomb might appear distrait anyway, the judgment was difficult.’
    • ‘Perhaps, patients about to undergo operations at the hands of distrait surgeons could be allowed to get their tattoos done on the NHS.’
    • ‘He has always seemed somewhat distrait, but now he has the lost air of a man who has fallen from the heavens into an unknown world.’
    • ‘His manner was, I thought, a shade distrait, a little other worldly.’
    • ‘Although her journey into madness is somewhat short-circuited, Rachel Pickup is also a frighteningly distrait Ophelia.’
    • ‘Set in Paris in 1928, Hastings's play focuses on Joyce's distrait daughter, Lucia.’
    distracted, preoccupied, absorbed, engrossed, abstracted, distant, faraway
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: French, from Old French destrait, past participle of destraire ‘distract’, from Latin distrahere ‘pull apart’ (see distract).

Pronunciation

distrait

/ˈdɪstreɪ//dɪˈstreɪ/