Definition of dissipate in English:

dissipate

verb

  • 1(with reference to a feeling or emotion) disappear or cause to disappear.

    [no object] ‘the concern she'd felt for him had wholly dissipated’
    [with object] ‘he wanted to dissipate his anger’
    • ‘Too often, free flowing emotions of sympathy dissipate with the initial fascination, without confronting the long-term consequences of misfortune.’
    • ‘So immediate emotion can dissipate before a country's population can make an important decision?’
    • ‘I'll go and see it again to see if my disappointment might dissipate.’
    • ‘Once she'd gotten there in his presence, all her organized thoughts dissipated into a messily arranged array of emotions.’
    • ‘Rage suddenly takes control as the other emotions dissipated when he'd been pulled from his meal.’
    • ‘Brant's anger dissipated at Gemmel's anger with himself.’
    • ‘Each time something like this happens, the anger dissipates slower and leaves a shadow behind.’
    • ‘At the same time, given the growth in household information, given integration, it's unlikely that the core for the housing market will evaporate or dissipate.’
    • ‘And if we say wait until May 2005 then we're dissipating all that anger.’
    • ‘That sinking feeling we'd experienced as we watched the snow fall when it was supposed to be melting dissipated.’
    • ‘He felt his anger dissipating as he looked at her.’
    • ‘By contrast, on film it looked like the mere aggregation of takes and cutaways; its timbres and its fluency dissipated and finally disappeared.’
    • ‘In minimum-security prisons, like the camp in Florence, Colorado where I currently am confined, racial tensions tend to dissipate, if not disappear.’
    • ‘It would attempt to lock future generations into a prejudice that has already dissipated and that someday may disappear.’
    • ‘My anger was slowly dissipating, but in its place was another emotion.’
    • ‘I don't hold on to the anger, if I can just let it dissipate on its own.’
    • ‘To her surprise, after their anger had dissipated, they were physically and emotionally more intimate.’
    • ‘Victims of those errors don't disappear, and their quest for justice doesn't dissipate.’
    • ‘Plus, these harsh emotions were already starting to dissipate, and I truly didn't want to unnerve my best friend.’
    • ‘Heneghan's third free and fifth point of the game, coming in the 55th minute, barely stirred the emotion as the Roscommon cause began to dissipate.’
    disappear, vanish, evaporate, dissolve, melt away, melt into thin air, be dispelled, dematerialize
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Disperse or scatter.
      ‘the cloud of smoke dissipated’
      • ‘The blue matter floated in the air for a moment, then it dissipated and vanished.’
      • ‘You see, in open areas - with plenty of fresh air and breeze going about - the smoke dissipates and goes off into the atmosphere.’
      • ‘She disappeared in a flash of smoke, dissipating like a shaken cloud.’
      • ‘The smoke has dissipated, and everything is all crystal clear now!’
      • ‘She sighed heavily, a plume of grey smoke and breath condensation dissipating in the air before her.’
      • ‘Gas bubbles that were trapped in the lines dissipated somewhat, but never completely disappeared.’
      • ‘I took a long, deep drag and watched the smoke rings dissipate in the cool evening sky.’
      • ‘These agents will evaporate and dissipate much more rapidly in hot, dry weather.’
      • ‘As the crowd scattered and dissipated, a few of us inched forward and managed to engage some of the sheriffs in conversation.’
      • ‘The thin cloud of smoke rushed out and dissipated into the air.’
      • ‘The fact that very few of the cathedral's stained-glass windows could be opened meant the smoke was slow to dissipate.’
      • ‘They were turning to the color of pale lemons as the smoke started to dissipate.’
      • ‘A wave of defeat seemed to wash over the slaves, and they slumped, confidence and hope draining as the smoke dissipated into the night air.’
      • ‘We continued to watch in silence as the smoke slowly dissipated, leaving only the cloudless, star-punctured sky.’
      • ‘Then the light dimmed until it disappeared and the wind dissipated.’
      • ‘The clouds that had blocked the sun during the day had dissipated, scattered by the winds to reveal the stars sprawled in all their glory across the sky.’
      • ‘Coughing lightly several more times, the black-haired player rubbed at her eyes and leaned against a wall while the smoke slowly dissipated.’
      • ‘He laughed out loud, and the wind carried his voice away, like a string of smoke dissipating.’
      • ‘The hydrogen dissipates quickly and disperses upward, while gasoline tends to pool fuel for an explosion.’
      • ‘A puff of green smoke glistened upward and dissipated.’
  • 2[with object] Waste or fritter away (money, energy, or resources)

    ‘he inherited, but then dissipated, his father's fortune’
    • ‘On the other hand those transferred resources could be dissipated in an array of outreach services seeking to stimulate demand.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, however, the modern puritans are dissipating and wasting this inspiring moral tradition.’
    • ‘To do otherwise is to dissipate resources in random spending.’
    • ‘You dissipate resources by maintaining economically unviable units.’
    • ‘Why, in such difficult times, are they dissipating their resources in this manner?’
    • ‘An important truth is that we need full and active participation in liturgy and you don't get that by dissipating your resources.’
    • ‘The most negative rendering is that the steward is justly charged with intentionally dissipating the owner's resources.’
    • ‘But what followed instead was a decline which saw all the flair and hope of the Keegan era dissipated as money flowed out of the coffers hand over fist, but for little return.’
    • ‘It meant resisting the temptation to chase off after secondary objectives and, in the process, dissipate resources.’
    • ‘Numerous winters have brought heavy snowfalls and low temperature and fortunes of stockmen have been dissipated in one season because of these adverse conditions.’
    • ‘Edwardes said: ‘The Ryder remedy only produced a bureaucratic paperchase dissipating management resource and effort.’’
    • ‘This fueled regional battles over property and influence, greatly dissipating the energy and resources of the OC.’
    • ‘That the moral capital of all three parties has been dissipated is not lost on the public, whose contempt for the political process has grown.’
    • ‘This trend suggests that some portion of the rent may have been dissipated in higher-than-necessary production costs.’
    • ‘The enormous amount of savings has largely been dissipated by poor choices for investment.’
    • ‘Given the current militancy of the public service unions, it is possible that much additional public spending will be dissipated in wage increases.’
    • ‘Thus by mid-1999 much of the positive effect of the devaluation on the real incomes of rural producers had been dissipated.’
    • ‘It's likely to dissipate resources ineffectually and spread potential damage far.’
    • ‘The monasteries had been dissolved and the proceeds dissipated in war.’
    • ‘But typically, the fortunes built by one generation will be completely dissipated by the second or third generation.’
    squander, misspend, waste, throw away, make poor use of, be prodigal with
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Physics
      Cause (energy) to be lost through its conversion to heat.
      ‘no power is dissipated in this sort of control element’
      • ‘This kinetic energy will be dissipated in the form of heat on impact of the clip with the magnet.’
      • ‘On impact, most of the kinetic energy dissipates as heat.’
      • ‘Water prevents dehydration and allows heat to be dissipated through evaporative cooling and urination.’
      • ‘As the basal part of the stem was linearly elastic, there was no energy dissipated by viscous friction.’
      • ‘There's a reduction in efficiency as energy is dissipated in heat.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin dissipat- scattered, from the verb dissipare, from dis- apart, widely + supare to throw.

Pronunciation:

dissipate

/ˈdɪsɪpeɪt/