Definition of dissertate in English:

dissertate

verb

[NO OBJECT]rare
  • 1 Discourse on a particular subject:

    ‘we have dissertated on the church at Antioch’
    • ‘Don Juan, attracted by the gypsy dancer Fifine, dissertates to Elvire on the nature of his feelings.’
    • ‘In a letter to Dan in 1800, after scolding him for his 'Budget being empty far too soon', she dissertated on the life of Catherine the Great.’
    • ‘Let me suppose, for example, that some modern 'Hobbes,' in dissertating on society at large, should malign mankind.’
    • ‘On the strength of nostalgia I wonder if I dare dissertate about the days of outdoor toilets.’
    • ‘She follows him from room to room if he tries to elude her, dissertating on the weakness of his character and the depravity of his mind.’
    hold forth about, speak at length about, write at length about, pontificate about, discourse on, expound, go into detail about, go on about, dwell on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Write a dissertation:
      ‘he was working incredibly long hours and I was dissertating’
      ‘at Stanford, she dissertated on selfhood and storytelling’
      • ‘I never got to ask what you'll be dissertating on.’
      • ‘While my advisors have been careful to make sure I am not getting too involved with my subject, the topic has proved so fascinating that I have rarely had time to ponder the darker side of dissertating.’
      • ‘I cannot connect to the Internet there, and the books where I sit are damn boring, so there's nothing to do but dissertate.’
      • ‘I'm working two jobs (and, in theory, researching a paper for next year); he's dissertating (and working one job, part-time).’
      • ‘I'd love to be able to say I was dissertating, but somehow a 12,000 word undergrad thesis isn't quite the same.’
      • ‘He is dissertating in the sciences.’
      • ‘My major field is History of Science, and I plan to dissertate on the development of the development of Quantum Mechanics.’
      • ‘He dissertated on rhetoric in American colleges and made a great splash among compositionists with Themes, Theories, and Therapy.’
      • ‘We have been protesting, rallying and mobilising, but we've also been distracted by the more mundane activities of teaching, dissertating, and drinking.’
      • ‘I should send out a couple of "real" academic articles dealing with the stuff I actually dissertated on.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from Latin dissertat-, from dissertare to continue to discuss.

Pronunciation:

dissertate

/ˈdɪsəteɪt/