Definition of dissection in English:

dissection

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The action of dissecting a body or plant to study its internal parts:

    ‘the dissection of animals for scientific research’
    • ‘For anatomists as well as academic theorists, Michelangelo's art exemplified the advantages of anatomical study by dissection.’
    • ‘Twenty-four lymph nodes were dissected from the axillary dissection, the largest measuring 2.0 x 1.0 cm.’
    • ‘Public dissections were outlawed in Britain 130 years ago.’
    • ‘Thirty-one patients had chest radiographs; however, only in 8 patients did they show evidence of aortic dissection.’
    • ‘Superficially, they all look very much alike, and dissection is often the only way to tell two species apart.’
    • ‘After careful dissection through the subcutaneous tissue and the fascia, a small incision was made at the peritoneum.’
    • ‘A radical neck dissection was positive in 3 of the 5 cases in which it was done at the time of the original diagnosis.’
    • ‘The seed coat tissues were separated by dissection into two fractions.’
    • ‘Public dissections were popular in the 16th century, with anatomical theatres open to audiences all over Europe.’
    • ‘Over the next centuries dissection of the human body became a standard part of the training of medical students.’
    • ‘Following sporulation and tetrad dissection, we determined the genotypes of the resulting haploid spores.’
    • ‘The mandibular branch was very close to the tumor, but with gentle dissection was able to be spared.’
    • ‘Following this, she underwent a left mastectomy with axillary dissection.’
    • ‘Pain may migrate from the chest downwards as the dissection progresses.’
    • ‘The dissection also extended proximally toward the heart.’
    • ‘Axillary dissection is considered a standard part of treatment for breast cancer.’
    • ‘A right near-total parotidectomy with right upper node neck dissection was performed.’
    • ‘Others only allow for dissections which hardly puncture the surface.’
    • ‘Eggs were then stored at - 20°C for later dissection.’
    • ‘A closed suction drain is placed following axillary dissection.’
    analysis, examination, study, inspection, scrutiny, scrutinization, probe, probing, exploration, investigation, enquiry
    cutting up, cutting open, dismemberment
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Very detailed analysis of a text or idea:
      ‘this dissection of modern relationships’
      • ‘The careful and merciless dissection of human nature was the aim of both writers.’
      • ‘To be more specific, this is a small, character driven dissection, a brief journey into the mind of a deranged serial killer.’
      • ‘Last week I said I'd run by you a dissection of a "genuine" cold reading.’
      • ‘It was fodder for water cooler and schoolyard discussions and dissections.’
      • ‘The newspapers are now filled with dissections of the his administration's diplomatic failures.’
      • ‘Sometimes their dissections are more entertaining than the shows themselves.’
      • ‘We can never be a fly on the wall to our own personality dissections, watching as people pick us apart after meeting us.’
      • ‘But now more important activities call than the dissection of diplomats - most notably at the moment, dinner.’
      • ‘The 18 th-century Chinese scholar Tai Chen presented an elegant dissection for approximating the value of pi.’
      • ‘He stresses that the book is not an exhaustive dissection of the series and its impact on popular culture.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, the events of that year have taken on a mythic quality that has resisted such scholarly dissection.’
      • ‘Also see his forthcoming book on early Chan texts for a unique dissection of early lineage claims and their supporting texts.’
      • ‘He describes his own intellectual odyssey and provides the most knowledgeable, dispassionate dissection of the evidence ever written.’
      • ‘Human diseases can be studied through the genetic dissection of quantitative traits in experimental models such as mouse and rat.’
      • ‘The use and dissection of specific material adds weight to the delicate historical analysis within the book.’
      • ‘This review will not be an extensive analysis and dissection of this film.’
      • ‘Other examples include a detailed dissection of how the expression of the HO gene is regulated.’
      • ‘Feeling reasonably guilty for my lack of input in our annual dissection, I decided I needed some intellectual nutrition to atone for my sins.’
      • ‘This analysis usually takes more time because it involves more dissection of pages beyond the one you're trying to optimize.’
      • ‘And so the dissection continues until, well, you're fairly convinced that Joe maybe isn't the authority he purports to be.’

Pronunciation:

dissection

/dɪˈsɛkʃn/