Definition of dismissal in English:

dismissal

noun

  • 1The act of ordering or allowing someone to leave.

    ‘their controversial dismissal from the competition’
    • ‘His early dismissal certainly contributed to the difficulties Wanderers faced - especially after they had already conceded a goal.’
    • ‘Craig Skinner, back at City after winning an appeal against his dismissal by the club, played the full 90 minutes.’
    • ‘The other blot on Boro's performance was the 89 th-minute dismissal of midfielder Jason Blunt for a second bookable offence.’
    • ‘As it happened, the arrogance of the faction sparked a backlash, resulting in the dismissal of the group's leader, John.’
    • ‘Marston bowed, hearing a dismissal in the kings words.’
    • ‘The taxpayer would travel to the sporting ground directly from his barracks and was required to return there for formal dismissal.’
    • ‘The dismissal of rookie Johnny Sauter from Richard Childress Racing's No.30 Chevrolet did not surprise anyone.’
    • ‘I just hope that your article does not assist in Karin Kortje's dismissal from the show.’
    • ‘He believed his dismissal had something to do with the drug squad.’
    • ‘I saw him pause, his forehead furrowing at her dismissal of me.’
    • ‘This World Cup had come to mean too much to him and the dismissal followed three bookings in his six matches here.’
    • ‘For Whittingham, the manner of her dismissal still haunts her.’
    • ‘That caused me to dismiss him - a dismissal that will forever embarrass me.’
    • ‘The tribunal is investigating claims of constructive dismissal made by former Wasps head coach Dean Robinson, and by his assistant coach, John Paterson.’
    one's notice, discharge
    rejection, repudiation, refusal, repulse, non-acceptance
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The act of removing someone from employment or office; discharge.
      ‘the dismissal of an employee’
      ‘a claim for unfair dismissal’
      • ‘The quickest way to find a solution is the immediate dismissal of the chiefs of the armed forces and the police.’
      • ‘A former CEO claiming unfair dismissal is currently having his case heard in the courts.’
      • ‘Despite reports of his likely dismissal, he has been assured that he will remain in the Cabinet.’
      • ‘In their daily routine, the performers must obey the rules and regulations, and violations can lead to job dismissal.’
      • ‘Workers at the Chrysler-Benz plant in Sao Bernardo do Campo mobilized on August 21 against the dismissal of 628 workers.’
      • ‘At the Tulle plant, where 200 of 389 employees are threatened with dismissal, 150 workers went out on strike.’
      • ‘Police yesterday said a rumour that Mr Trotter was involved in the dismissal of three employees from his firm was untrue.’
      • ‘His dismissal in October followed a complaint from a patient.’
      • ‘The drivers did this in response to the dismissal of one of their work colleagues.’
      • ‘The volunteers were uncompensated and subject to immediate dismissal for any reason whatsoever.’
      • ‘The existing procedure to cushion the effects of mass dismissals has been broadened in scope and effect.’
      • ‘Inform the worker that continuing his offensive behavior will lead to dismissal.’
      • ‘There is no fixed rule of law defining the degree of misconduct which will justify dismissal.’
      • ‘Mrs. Lingard claims constructive dismissal and victimisation for whistle-blowing against the Prison Service.’
      • ‘Both have been unsuccessful in their claims for unfair dismissal.’
      • ‘The reason for dismissal must be that uppermost in the mind of the employer at the time of dismissal.’
      • ‘I think new magistrates should have been secured long before the dismissal.’
      • ‘The dismissal of skipper Fernando was costly for the airmen as they never looked comfortable thereafter.’
      • ‘Complaints from three patients in 1999 led to a full enquiry, resulting in his suspension and eventual dismissal.’
    2. 1.2 An instance of ending a batsman's innings or of having one's innings ended.
      ‘the dismissal of a batsman’
      • ‘During that tour Mooney played 27 matches and made 65 dismissals, 44 caught and 21 stumped.’
      • ‘But, after the dismissal of Adams early in the second half, Saints came back with goals from Keigan Parker and Momo Sylla.’
      • ‘All of the bowlers must enjoy a more productive season than last year when Ryan Sidebottom was the leading wicket-taker with only 41 dismissals.’
      • ‘England supporters will be well aware of a disputed LBW dismissal of top West Indian batsman Brian Lara in the final test at the Oval.’
      • ‘If you list the top 20 test wicket-takers in order of dismissals per game, you can see just how amazing Murali is.’
  • 2The act of treating something as unworthy of serious consideration; rejection.

    ‘the government's dismissal of the report’
    • ‘This isn't a blanket dismissal of Talbot; her numerous praiseworthy affiliations aside, I've liked stuff of hers.’
    • ‘"Now you're just being annoying," grumbled Simon Cowell as Andy refused to accept his dismissal.’
    • ‘Meg flapped a hand in dismissal.’
    • ‘How often have I seen people raise questions about the work of a hero only to be met by quiet derision or patronizing dismissal.’
    • ‘I can't really think of a clever dismissal or arch comment to make about this.’
    • ‘What does Sun think of IBM's dismissal of OpenOffice?’
    • ‘But his dismissal of the Weekly Standard's article on Lennon's "Imagine" is misguided.’
    • ‘As with O'Reilly, offhand dismissal of critics is not a good practice for any business, organization, group, or individual.’
    1. 2.1Law A decision not to continue hearing a case.
      ‘the dismissal of the appeal’
      • ‘Two defenses were laid out in a Christian Science Monitor story following the Dupre dismissal.’
      • ‘The time from its first hearing in the High Court to an appeal and dismissal by the law lords was about 36 hours.’
      • ‘In addition the department records cases of misconduct by teachers, which takes account of not only court convictions but dismissals and even press reports.’
      • ‘Given the interlocutory nature of this appeal, a remand rather than an outright dismissal is appropriate.’
      • ‘The Diallo 7 have now been offered an adjournment contemplating dismissal, which is what they had expected initially.’

Pronunciation

dismissal

/dɪsˈmɪsl/