Definition of dismissal in English:

dismissal

noun

  • 1The act of ordering or allowing someone to leave.

    ‘their controversial dismissal from the competition’
    • ‘The tribunal is investigating claims of constructive dismissal made by former Wasps head coach Dean Robinson, and by his assistant coach, John Paterson.’
    • ‘Craig Skinner, back at City after winning an appeal against his dismissal by the club, played the full 90 minutes.’
    • ‘As it happened, the arrogance of the faction sparked a backlash, resulting in the dismissal of the group's leader, John.’
    • ‘That caused me to dismiss him - a dismissal that will forever embarrass me.’
    • ‘I just hope that your article does not assist in Karin Kortje's dismissal from the show.’
    • ‘I saw him pause, his forehead furrowing at her dismissal of me.’
    • ‘His early dismissal certainly contributed to the difficulties Wanderers faced - especially after they had already conceded a goal.’
    • ‘He believed his dismissal had something to do with the drug squad.’
    • ‘The taxpayer would travel to the sporting ground directly from his barracks and was required to return there for formal dismissal.’
    • ‘Marston bowed, hearing a dismissal in the kings words.’
    • ‘The other blot on Boro's performance was the 89 th-minute dismissal of midfielder Jason Blunt for a second bookable offence.’
    • ‘The dismissal of rookie Johnny Sauter from Richard Childress Racing's No.30 Chevrolet did not surprise anyone.’
    • ‘This World Cup had come to mean too much to him and the dismissal followed three bookings in his six matches here.’
    • ‘For Whittingham, the manner of her dismissal still haunts her.’
    one's notice, discharge
    rejection, repudiation, refusal, repulse, non-acceptance
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The act of removing someone from employment or office; discharge.
      ‘the dismissal of an employee’
      ‘a claim for unfair dismissal’
      • ‘The quickest way to find a solution is the immediate dismissal of the chiefs of the armed forces and the police.’
      • ‘The dismissal of skipper Fernando was costly for the airmen as they never looked comfortable thereafter.’
      • ‘Workers at the Chrysler-Benz plant in Sao Bernardo do Campo mobilized on August 21 against the dismissal of 628 workers.’
      • ‘Mrs. Lingard claims constructive dismissal and victimisation for whistle-blowing against the Prison Service.’
      • ‘The drivers did this in response to the dismissal of one of their work colleagues.’
      • ‘Inform the worker that continuing his offensive behavior will lead to dismissal.’
      • ‘At the Tulle plant, where 200 of 389 employees are threatened with dismissal, 150 workers went out on strike.’
      • ‘Both have been unsuccessful in their claims for unfair dismissal.’
      • ‘There is no fixed rule of law defining the degree of misconduct which will justify dismissal.’
      • ‘A former CEO claiming unfair dismissal is currently having his case heard in the courts.’
      • ‘The reason for dismissal must be that uppermost in the mind of the employer at the time of dismissal.’
      • ‘Police yesterday said a rumour that Mr Trotter was involved in the dismissal of three employees from his firm was untrue.’
      • ‘Complaints from three patients in 1999 led to a full enquiry, resulting in his suspension and eventual dismissal.’
      • ‘His dismissal in October followed a complaint from a patient.’
      • ‘In their daily routine, the performers must obey the rules and regulations, and violations can lead to job dismissal.’
      • ‘The volunteers were uncompensated and subject to immediate dismissal for any reason whatsoever.’
      • ‘Despite reports of his likely dismissal, he has been assured that he will remain in the Cabinet.’
      • ‘I think new magistrates should have been secured long before the dismissal.’
      • ‘The existing procedure to cushion the effects of mass dismissals has been broadened in scope and effect.’
    2. 1.2Cricket
      An instance of ending a batsman's innings or of having one's innings ended.
      ‘the dismissal of a batsman’
      • ‘All of the bowlers must enjoy a more productive season than last year when Ryan Sidebottom was the leading wicket-taker with only 41 dismissals.’
      • ‘If you list the top 20 test wicket-takers in order of dismissals per game, you can see just how amazing Murali is.’
      • ‘But, after the dismissal of Adams early in the second half, Saints came back with goals from Keigan Parker and Momo Sylla.’
      • ‘During that tour Mooney played 27 matches and made 65 dismissals, 44 caught and 21 stumped.’
      • ‘England supporters will be well aware of a disputed LBW dismissal of top West Indian batsman Brian Lara in the final test at the Oval.’
  • 2The act of treating something as unworthy of serious consideration; rejection.

    ‘the government's dismissal of the report’
    • ‘Meg flapped a hand in dismissal.’
    • ‘As with O'Reilly, offhand dismissal of critics is not a good practice for any business, organization, group, or individual.’
    • ‘What does Sun think of IBM's dismissal of OpenOffice?’
    • ‘How often have I seen people raise questions about the work of a hero only to be met by quiet derision or patronizing dismissal.’
    • ‘This isn't a blanket dismissal of Talbot; her numerous praiseworthy affiliations aside, I've liked stuff of hers.’
    • ‘I can't really think of a clever dismissal or arch comment to make about this.’
    • ‘"Now you're just being annoying," grumbled Simon Cowell as Andy refused to accept his dismissal.’
    • ‘But his dismissal of the Weekly Standard's article on Lennon's "Imagine" is misguided.’
    1. 2.1Law
      A decision not to continue hearing a case.
      ‘the dismissal of the appeal’
      • ‘The Diallo 7 have now been offered an adjournment contemplating dismissal, which is what they had expected initially.’
      • ‘The time from its first hearing in the High Court to an appeal and dismissal by the law lords was about 36 hours.’
      • ‘Two defenses were laid out in a Christian Science Monitor story following the Dupre dismissal.’
      • ‘In addition the department records cases of misconduct by teachers, which takes account of not only court convictions but dismissals and even press reports.’
      • ‘Given the interlocutory nature of this appeal, a remand rather than an outright dismissal is appropriate.’

Pronunciation:

dismissal

/dɪsˈmɪsl/