Definition of disgust in English:

disgust

noun

  • [mass noun] A feeling of revulsion or strong disapproval aroused by something unpleasant or offensive:

    ‘the sight filled her with disgust’
    ‘some of the audience walked out in disgust’
    • ‘I write to you in disgust at the comments made by your columnist.’
    • ‘When the motion was passed over 200 delegates stormed out of the conference in disgust.’
    • ‘He left his job in disgust after being passed over for promotion and pay rises which were given to younger members of staff.’
    • ‘I picked one up suspiciously, squeezed it, and then flung it back on the tray in disgust.’
    • ‘The cabin smelled of mildew, and they turned their noses up in disgust.’
    • ‘She crumpled it up in her hand and threw it to the floor in disgust, then sighed deeply.’
    • ‘Some openly jeered and shouted in disgust when the final vote tally was announced.’
    • ‘I left the cinema half an hour before the end of the film in disgust, anger and, quite frankly, boredom.’
    • ‘I threw my betting slip down in disgust, and moved on to have a go at shooting some cans to try to win a furry toy instead.’
    • ‘I am writing in disgust over plans to demolish the Library and replace it with flats.’
    • ‘She threw her hand to her nose in disgust as her peers burst out into a jovial laughter.’
    • ‘She glared at the man in disgust but allowed him to take a blood sample and check her fever.’
    • ‘They also said that their foreman had resigned in disgust over the manner of the dismissal.’
    • ‘She almost pulled her hand away in disgust, but managed to control herself.’
    • ‘Once again, this may seem obvious to some, and others may stop reading at this point in disgust.’
    • ‘Sarah looked away in disgust, but everywhere were the signs of disrepair.’
    • ‘The show fanatics behind kept clucking in disgust and making noises of disapproval.’
    • ‘Some small shareholders were so upset by events they walked out in disgust.’
    • ‘She went on a bit more, but I didn't hear any of it, due to my storming off in disgust.’
    • ‘Some home fans had seen enough and promptly threw their season tickets onto the pitch in disgust.’
    revulsion, repugnance, aversion, distaste, abhorrence, loathing, detestation, odium, execration, horror
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cause (someone) to feel revulsion or strong disapproval:

    ‘they were disgusted by the violence’
    ‘a disgusted look’
    • ‘It disgusts me, yet I can't seem to resist looking at it.’
    • ‘There's a vicious, potentially hurtful quality to it that disgusts me.’
    • ‘In fact, it totally disgusts me that my name has been used in this way and I wish to put it on record that I totally disassociate myself from this party.’
    • ‘When I look back it disgusts me that I was on so little money just because I was too young to qualify for the minimum wage.’
    • ‘I am disgusted that anyone gave permission for that embarrassing advertisement.’
    • ‘The fact that they are keeping us in the dark for so long about whether or not we are actually going to have a hospital let alone a maternity unit disgusts me.’
    • ‘I didn't say one word to the players after the game because I am absolutely disgusted with them.’
    • ‘Quite frankly, it disgusts me and I do not feel enough is done for elderly people.’
    • ‘Whatever those guys in the presidential palaces or state houses have to say, we know the truth - and it both alarms and disgusts us.’
    • ‘I was disgusted, at such a serious moment and even horrific, how could he think of money.’
    • ‘But there's a falsity in the reaction to the disaster that both intrigues and disgusts me.’
    • ‘The greed and the misdirected energy of this administration disgusts me.’
    • ‘Instead of doing something about the safety of the road they're increasing the volume of traffic and that disgusts me.’
    • ‘The fact that people were wringing their hands and arguing the point disgusts me.’
    • ‘He disgusts me and nothing's going to get me buying one of his records, ever again.’
    • ‘Your ladyship should know about my beliefs and frankly your behaviour disgusts me.’
    • ‘I'm absolutely disgusted by the behaviour of all the people concerned in this case.’
    • ‘It disgusts me that one of the best songwriters of his generation is being treated as the butt of jokes and victim of snide remarks.’
    • ‘There's something about their exuberant cheesiness that, quite frankly, disgusts me.’
    • ‘He says he is disgusted with the way peace protesters have been behaving.’
    revolt, repel, repulse, sicken, nauseate, cause to feel nauseous, make shudder, turn someone's stomach, make someone's gorge rise
    outrage, shock, horrify, appal, scandalize, offend, affront, dismay, displease, dissatisfy
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Origin

Late 16th century: from early modern French desgoust or Italian disgusto, from Latin dis- (expressing reversal) + gustus taste.

Pronunciation:

disgust

/dɪsˈɡʌst/