Definition of disgruntle in English:

disgruntle

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make (someone) angry or dissatisfied.

    ‘nothing disgruntles anyone more than the feeling they are being cheated’
    • ‘This is a man who thought nothing of disgruntling rabid fans of his two first solo albums, Heartbreaker and Gold, by releasing a pop-rock album.’
    • ‘This new action-heavy approach threatens to disgruntle hardcore fans of the series.’
    • ‘But then he was passed over for a promotion because of his youth, an oversight that disgruntles him even today.’
    • ‘The car's make-over may disgruntle a few buyers who love Audis precisely because they're not BMWs.’
    • ‘He was disgruntled by Clara's unflattering comments about his brother.’
    • ‘The salaries of council managers came under the spotlight as municipal workers went on strike over pay and communities disgruntled by poor service delivery protested in many places.’
    • ‘The event was organized by the District Council to make amends with locals disgruntled by weeks of traffic delays caused by roadworks.’
    • ‘Nothing disgruntles anyone more, regardless of nationality, than the feeling they are being cheated or discriminated against.’
    • ‘I suspect that a one-hour signing for an entire country like Germany seems like a recipe for disgruntling an awful lot of German readers.’
    • ‘There aren't any foreign language soundtracks available on the disc, which could disgruntle some.’
    • ‘Key is a first term MP and Brash probably doesn't want to disgruntle another front-bencher by usurping their seat for a fresher.’
    • ‘He stayed with the club through thick and thin and nothing disgruntled him.’
    displease, fail to satisfy, give cause for complaint, not be good enough
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: from dis- (as an intensifier) + dialect gruntle ‘utter little grunts’, from grunt.

Pronunciation

disgruntle

/dɪsˈɡrʌnt(ə)l/