Definition of discouragement in English:

discouragement

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A loss of confidence or enthusiasm; dispiritedness:

    ‘do not give in to discouragement’
    • ‘When love is functioning properly in our lives it dispels discouragement, despondency and despair.’
    • ‘Their own families have never uttered a word of discouragement.’
    • ‘Without the added burden of discouragement, the freedom of emotional release becomes inevitable.’
    • ‘Each in turn rescued Matisse from deep discouragement by providing a way to kick-start his imagination.’
    • ‘You must resist this discouragement by having the attitude that there is no pain you will not endure for spiritual victory.’
    • ‘The female looks at them with an air of discouragement.’
    • ‘Editor after editor has resigned in quiet discouragement over profit pressures in recent years.’
    • ‘This serves as a discouragement to help the poor.’
    • ‘Our goals should be high enough to motivate yet realistic enough to avoid discouragement.’
    • ‘They are the people fatigue and discouragement will take down first.’
    • ‘I will never surrender to discouragement or despair no matter what seeming obstacles may confront me.’
    • ‘This will prevent the mind from sinking into discouragement or aimlessness.’
    • ‘Most people give up upon hearing a negative response or discouragement.’
    • ‘During the resultant three-hour detour, we encountered sundry additional discouragements.’
    • ‘It takes both perseverance and technical knowledge to avoid discouragement and get to the good eats.’
    • ‘Let us go on with our work as briskly as possible, whatever temporary discouragements we may meet with.’
    • ‘Their discouragement produced symptoms of the psychological harm called learned helplessness.’
    • ‘The pastor who cannot manage a growing church will be filled with frustration and discouragement.’
    • ‘The feeling of discouragement usually goes away within a reasonable length of time.’
    • ‘Such labelling has serious consequences for all members of the group concerned, often leading to discouragement.’
    deterrent, disincentive
    dispiritedness, downheartedness, dejection, depression, demoralization, disappointment, despondency, hopelessness, lack of enthusiasm, lack of confidence, pessimism, despair, gloom, gloominess, low spirits
    View synonyms
  • 2An attempt to prevent something by showing disapproval or creating difficulties; deterrent:

    ‘the discouragement of crime’
    • ‘I cannot see that there is any discouragement of the implementation of a higher standard if the Member State chooses to impose it.’
    • ‘I think one of the great losses in all of this trouble has been the discouragement of women from performing.’
    • ‘There is no logic in this — the idea ought to be a stimulus instead of a discouragement.’
    • ‘This is a discouragement to States from using the qualifications contained, for example, in Arts 8-11 for illegitimate purposes.’
    • ‘The South Korean government is also slowly changing its long-time discouragement of foreign participation in the economy.’
    • ‘There is far too many who seem to believe they have a ministry of discouragement.’
    • ‘If Chan had taken my class, he would have heard my discouragement of naming names or political parties.’
    • ‘And none of this is meant as a discouragement from investing in Kino's superb new seven-disc Griffith package.’
    • ‘Despite official discouragement of settlement, Newfoundland became de facto the first overseas British colony.’
    • ‘I would advocate active discouragement of such appeals.’
    • ‘And the discouragement of games in public places intensifies the problem.’
    • ‘Honestly, I have never given him any form of encouragement, and believe me, I have taken every possible opportunity for discouragement.’
    • ‘There is further discouragement for the players in that in the workplace only 3 % of reinstatement appeals are successful.’
    • ‘There is a stronger tradition of discouragement of close modeling of writing than there is of close modeling of imagery.’
    • ‘One of the great sins of the Christian church is the discouragement of doubting.’
    • ‘Heath pursued his European vision against every discouragement.’
    • ‘Setting aside the discouragement of friends, they packed their bags and got ready to leave.’
    • ‘She is a working model of how an individual can use this right despite the discouragement of outside parties.’

Pronunciation

discouragement

/dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒm(ə)nt/