Definition of disappoint in English:

disappoint

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Fail to fulfil the hopes or expectations of:

    ‘I have no wish to disappoint everyone by postponing the visit’
    • ‘Yet many could be disappointed if more men fail to come forward.’
    • ‘Although I do not wish to disappoint you, we have been in a constant state of stalemate.’
    • ‘Well no matter how low my expectations might have been, they would have been disappointed.’
    • ‘She did not want to disappoint him and wished that she hadn't stepped forward.’
    • ‘They constantly disappoint the young by failing to live up to their expectations of them.’
    • ‘While disappointed by the delay he was glad the operation had commenced.’
    • ‘US storage giant EMC has reiterated its guidance for the year, disappointing investors slightly.’
    • ‘A pessimist, they say, is someone passionate who has been disappointed on too many occasions.’
    • ‘And once again it didn't fail to disappoint every Burnley fan and player.’
    • ‘Cllr Michael Foley said it was disappointing to hear of the slow progress.’
    • ‘I'm trying to not get expectations too high though because I am bound to be disappointed if I do.’
    • ‘It is no concern of the author that their readers might attempt to replicate a way of life that does not exist, or be disappointed when they fail to do so.’
    • ‘They had been disappointed on too many occasions but they couldn't help it.’
    • ‘What, if anything, will please or disappoint fans of the video game?’
    • ‘You should not get carried away by success or get disappointed by failure.’
    • ‘The society said it was dismayed and disappointed by the club's actions.’
    • ‘I am occasionally disappointed by the failure of some ACLU Chapters to live up to their libertarian pedigree.’
    • ‘He said he was disappointed and disillusioned by the treatment of asylum seekers in Britain.’
    • ‘Yet only the most indifferent supporter could fail to be disappointed at how the season has imploded.’
    • ‘Many readers have been disappointed by the performance of the stock market.’
    let down, fail, dash the hopes of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Prevent (hopes or expectations) from being realized:
      ‘the governing coalition had bitterly disappointed the hopes of its voters’
      • ‘If such hopes were disappointed, equity markets and investment could fall further.’
      • ‘One last set of inflated expectations likely to be disappointed is New Labour's.’
      • ‘We got hit from both sides of the debate and disappointed both sets of expectations.’
      • ‘Initial hopes were disappointed but the reason became apparent early in the New Year.’
      • ‘A product which causes injury when put to its core uses clearly disappoints consumer expectations, and liability should be imposed accordingly.’
      • ‘Livingstone would not be exempt from a Blair-type trashing if he too disappoints these high expectations.’
      • ‘We hope to interest admirers of the genre and hope we do not disappoint their expectations.’
      • ‘She didn't want to turn around, didn't want to disappoint her foolish hopes.’
      • ‘This is an encouraging sign that the company is unlikely to disappoint market expectations.’
      • ‘The expectation is disappointed because the universe is simply impersonal and uncaring.’
      • ‘When our expectations are disappointed, we blame ourselves rather than Nature.’
      • ‘Their deepest expectation, currently repressed, is that their expectations will be disappointed.’
      • ‘He marries, then, unwillingly, just as he, on his wedding day, unwillingly disappoints Mary's expectation of a honeymoon trip.’
      • ‘What he does is very good, but systematically disappoints all expectations of the Wagner community, both fans and enemies alike.’
      • ‘The good leader has to disappoint these expectations at a rate the people can stand.’
      • ‘Ten years later, there is no doubt that many of these hopes were disappointed.’
      thwart, frustrate, baulk, foil, dash, defeat, baffle, put a damper on, put the damper on, nip in the bud
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘deprive of a position’): from Old French desappointer.

Pronunciation:

disappoint

/dɪsəˈpɔɪnt/