Definition of diplomatist in English:



  • old-fashioned term for diplomat
    • ‘A life's work such as that of Professor Charlotte Angas Scott is worth more to the world than many anxious efforts of diplomatists.’
    • ‘A disciple of Plato from 388 / 7, he married Dionysius' daughter Arete and became his most trusted minister and diplomatist.’
    • ‘There certainly have been a great number of successful diplomatists, as they would be called in the old days.’
    • ‘The traces of Yax Pasaj's activities as a peripatetic diplomatist are also preserved in several inscribed alabaster vases from western Honduras.’
    • ‘He had a supreme reverence for the truth, his word was his bond - a trait which Englishmen love and which will always make them poor diplomatists.’
    • ‘The New York Times obituary quotes Yale historian John Lewis Gaddis, Kennan's authorized biographer: ‘He'll be remembered as a diplomatist and a grand strategist of the cold war.’’
    • ‘British diplomatist Sir Harold Nicolson (like him, an eighteenth century man living a seventeenth century life in the midst of the twentieth century) sought him out on his valedictory trip to the United States in 1963.’
    • ‘Modem communications has made the diplomatist's task more not less difficult simply because of the problem of keeping track of this complicated network of inter-communication.’
    • ‘There are people for whom professional diplomatists are out of touch, upper - class ex-Oxbridge twits, paid over-large salaries for living on the cocktail circuit.’
    • ‘‘The diplomatist has to recognize,’ writes Martin Wight, ‘his own objectives and limitations; there are certain things he wants, certain consequences he fears, and certain things he cannot do because his power reaches its limits.’’
    • ‘The point of the book is to emphasize the role of President Lincoln as a diplomatist and of slavery as a world issue in re-evaluating the European decision not to intervene in the American conflict.’
    • ‘Solemn supermen and imperial diplomatists are proud of restraining their anger.’
    • ‘The son of Lady Elizabeth Savile, for whom Halifax had written his ‘Advice to a Daughter’ He was a distinguished statesman and diplomatist, ambassador at The Hague 1728-32 and lord lieutenant of Ireland 1745-6.’