Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3dink4

dink1

noun

  • another term for dinky
    • ‘I'm a dink, you know, Double Income No Kids.’
    • ‘Sometimes referred to as DINK's (Double Income - No Kids), couples who choose to be childless contend with tremendous pressures from family and friends.’
    • ‘DINKs will never know the joy and pride of bringing up sons and daughters, seeing them develop into productive citizens, educated and trained in the fields that make America special, and faithful to the old folks when the time comes.’

Origin

1980s: acronym from double income, no kids.

Pronunciation

dink

/dɪŋk/

Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3dink4

dink2

noun

  • (in sport) a softly struck hit or kick of the ball that drops abruptly to the ground.

    ‘a brilliantly controlled backhand dink over the net’
    • ‘Cowie sent the ball in and a neat dink by Ferguson left Gethins with ample time to strike the net.’
    • ‘Pentham charged forward like a runaway Rhino and, roared on by the vocal Thwaites fans, finished with a sublime dink over the keeper which defied a man of his size.’
    • ‘Crawford's lovely little dink over Speroni in the 78th minute, after co-star Brewster set him up, had East End Park shaking to its foundations.’
    • ‘And then there was Munster's inability to cope with the dinks and kicks through by Duncan McRae and Henry Paul which eventually proved their undoing.’
    • ‘An enterprising dink by Ronan O'Gara set up the attack but even then they depended on an All Black fumble to keep the attack alive.’
    • ‘He often uses as many slices, dinks and touch shots as he does conventional topspin drives, and sometimes this heady brew turns out to be too clever for its own good.’
    • ‘Henman saves the best to last and follows a hard first serve in with a deft/deft dink/dink volley at the net.’
    • ‘The Ireland striker had already underlined his confidence with a cheeky dink past Mikael Silvestre, but the shot he dragged past the post from 20 yards had threatened to inflict more serious damage.’
    • ‘Henman saves the best to last and follows a hard first serve in with a deft dink volley at the net.’
    • ‘The first set was won when a retrieving dink and a cutely angled forehand pass, both by Huss, achieved mini-breaks in the tie-break.’
    • ‘I never like it when I see Djokovic playing his little dinks and sliced drop shots.’
    • ‘Through the second and third sets, the Olympic gold medallist tormented the Czech with chips and dinks.’
    • ‘The big-hitting Ukrainian reacts to the lightest of dinks from the Frenchman with a full-blooded backhand smash.’
    • ‘It was a game where both defences spent their time in a perpetual state of confusion best exemplified by Gary Caldwell's indecision in dealing with a Hartley dink over the top close to the half-hour mark.’

verb

[with object]
  • Hit or kick (the ball) softly so that it drops abruptly to the ground.

    ‘he dinked a shot over the net to take the second set 7–5’
    • ‘The Scot doesn't do enough with his response, allowing Djokovic to dink the ball over to win the point.’
    • ‘The drama is unbearable as a lob from Murray goes long to hand Federer set point and he dinks a shot over the net which the Scot can't reach to take the second set 7-5.’
    • ‘The net was asking to be rattled but Amond choose to dink the ball over the bar and provide the point that ensured his side's survival.’
    • ‘Some of her flat-racket ground-strokes were irresistible and she was not afraid to chip, dink or gamble in tight situations.’
    • ‘He stormed from halfway, skipped past John Terry way too easily and, with Cech off his line, dinked a chip just wide from the edge of the area.’
    • ‘Milevskiy strolls up, waits for the keeper to dive, then dinks it down the middle of the goal.’
    • ‘Almost lying on the court, the Serb manages to send the ball back Murray's way before dinking it over the net to go 30-15 up in the seventh game.’
    • ‘Federer shows exquisite touch to dink the ball past Philippoussis and go 30-15 up on the Aussie's serve but Philippoussis manages to serve his way out trouble and stay alive in the set.’
    • ‘After a slightly wayward tee shot which lands on the edge of the trees, Woods takes no chances, dinking the ball out on to the fairway for a chip over the water to the green.’
    • ‘Brilliant footwork by Kanu enables him to dink a clever ball from halfway in the general direction of Wiltord and Ljungberg.’
    • ‘The ever-smiling genius bamboozled the defender before dinking a lovely ball through to Roberto Carlos, who blasted straight at the keeper from 10 yards.’
    • ‘Robinson picked out the unmarked midfielder Robert Power inside the penalty area but Power dinked a left-footed effort the wrong side of the post.’
    • ‘Rather than hoick the ball up field he stood stil and let Nedved dink the ball through his legs.’

Origin

1930s (originally a North American usage): symbolic of the light action.

Pronunciation

dink

/dɪŋk/

Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3dink4

dink3

noun

Australian
  • A lift on a bicycle.

    ‘you will have to give him a dink on the handlebars’

verb

Australian
  • Carry a passenger on a bicycle.

    with object ‘I dinked him down the path to the main gate’
    no object ‘when nobody was watching they would double-dink’

Origin

1930s: origin unknown.

Pronunciation

dink

/dɪŋk/

Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3dink4

dink4

noun

North American
vulgar slang
  • 1A man's penis.

    1. 1.1 A stupid or contemptible person (used especially of a man).

Origin

Late 19th century: perhaps from dinkus (variant of dingus), influenced by dick.

Pronunciation

dink

/dɪŋk/