Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3

dink1

noun

Pronunciation:

dink

/dɪŋk/

Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3

dink2

noun

  • (in sport) a softly struck hit or kick of the ball that drops abruptly to the ground.

    ‘a brilliantly controlled backhand dink over the net’
    • ‘The Ireland striker had already underlined his confidence with a cheeky dink past Mikael Silvestre, but the shot he dragged past the post from 20 yards had threatened to inflict more serious damage.’
    • ‘The big-hitting Ukrainian reacts to the lightest of dinks from the Frenchman with a full-blooded backhand smash.’
    • ‘Henman saves the best to last and follows a hard first serve in with a deft/deft dink/dink volley at the net.’
    • ‘Crawford's lovely little dink over Speroni in the 78th minute, after co-star Brewster set him up, had East End Park shaking to its foundations.’
    • ‘An enterprising dink by Ronan O'Gara set up the attack but even then they depended on an All Black fumble to keep the attack alive.’
    • ‘I never like it when I see Djokovic playing his little dinks and sliced drop shots.’
    • ‘Cowie sent the ball in and a neat dink by Ferguson left Gethins with ample time to strike the net.’
    • ‘It was a game where both defences spent their time in a perpetual state of confusion best exemplified by Gary Caldwell's indecision in dealing with a Hartley dink over the top close to the half-hour mark.’
    • ‘And then there was Munster's inability to cope with the dinks and kicks through by Duncan McRae and Henry Paul which eventually proved their undoing.’
    • ‘He often uses as many slices, dinks and touch shots as he does conventional topspin drives, and sometimes this heady brew turns out to be too clever for its own good.’
    • ‘Through the second and third sets, the Olympic gold medallist tormented the Czech with chips and dinks.’
    • ‘Pentham charged forward like a runaway Rhino and, roared on by the vocal Thwaites fans, finished with a sublime dink over the keeper which defied a man of his size.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Hit or kick (the ball) softly so that it drops abruptly to the ground.

    ‘he dinked a shot over the net to take the second set 7–5’
    • ‘He stormed from halfway, skipped past John Terry way too easily and, with Cech off his line, dinked a chip just wide from the edge of the area.’
    • ‘Some of her flat-racket ground-strokes were irresistible and she was not afraid to chip, dink or gamble in tight situations.’
    • ‘After a slightly wayward tee shot which lands on the edge of the trees, Woods takes no chances, dinking the ball out on to the fairway for a chip over the water to the green.’
    • ‘Brilliant footwork by Kanu enables him to dink a clever ball from halfway in the general direction of Wiltord and Ljungberg.’
    • ‘The drama is unbearable as a lob from Murray goes long to hand Federer set point and he dinks a shot over the net which the Scot can't reach to take the second set 7-5.’
    • ‘The Scot doesn't do enough with his response, allowing Djokovic to dink the ball over to win the point.’
    • ‘Almost lying on the court, the Serb manages to send the ball back Murray's way before dinking it over the net to go 30-15 up in the seventh game.’
    • ‘The ever-smiling genius bamboozled the defender before dinking a lovely ball through to Roberto Carlos, who blasted straight at the keeper from 10 yards.’
    • ‘The net was asking to be rattled but Amond choose to dink the ball over the bar and provide the point that ensured his side's survival.’
    • ‘Milevskiy strolls up, waits for the keeper to dive, then dinks it down the middle of the goal.’
    • ‘Federer shows exquisite touch to dink the ball past Philippoussis and go 30-15 up on the Aussie's serve but Philippoussis manages to serve his way out trouble and stay alive in the set.’
    • ‘Rather than hoick the ball up field he stood stil and let Nedved dink the ball through his legs.’
    • ‘Robinson picked out the unmarked midfielder Robert Power inside the penalty area but Power dinked a left-footed effort the wrong side of the post.’

Origin

1930s (originally a North American usage): symbolic of the light action.

Pronunciation:

dink

/dɪŋk/

Main definitions of dink in English

: dink1dink2dink3

dink3

noun

Australian
  • A lift on a bicycle.

    ‘you will have to give him a dink on the handlebars’

verb

Australian
  • Carry a passenger on a bicycle.

    [with object] ‘I dinked him down the path to the main gate’
    [no object] ‘when nobody was watching they would double-dink’

Origin

1930s: origin unknown.

Pronunciation:

dink

/dɪŋk/